The Ferrari Daytona SP3 is a V12-engined homage to the past

·2-min read

Ferrari has revealed a new limited-edition supercar that pays homage to the past while sporting the latest technological advancements.

Called Daytona SP3, it has been inspired by the models that achieved a one-two-three finish for the Italian firm at the 1967 24 Hours of Daytona race in America.

Built as part of the Icona series, which nod to the firm’s past successes, the Daytona SP3’s styling is inspired by the 330 P4, 350 Can-Am and 512 S, which were some of the first race cars to really take advantage of aerodynamics.

Ferrari Daytona SP3
(Ferrari)

The targa design is a further reference to sports car racing, with butterfly doors that have an integrated air intake that channels air to the side-mounted radiators. The side mirrors have been moved from the door to the tops of the wings, while the rest of the car has various wings and intakes to create downforce or cool the engine.

That engine is Ferrari’s iconic V12 unit, borrowed from the 812 Competizione. It’s a 6.5-litre unit making 828bhp with a 9,500rpm redline. It has been worked on to reduce its weight, with the titanium con rods being 40 per cent lighter than the regular steel ones, while new piston pins have a coating that reduces friction to improve performance and consumption.

Ferrari Daytona SP3
(Ferrari)

The cabin of the Daytona SP3 will be very familiar to anyone who’s driven a modern Ferrari. There’s that flat-bottomed steering wheel, manettino switch and the large yellow rev counter front and centre.

Seats integrated into the chassis creates a more race car-like feel, positioning the driver lower in the vehicle and creating a wraparound feeling.

This is the third Icona model to be released by Ferrari, with the first being the Monza SP 1 and SP2. Those cars were inspired by the competition barchettas of the 1950s that launched the firm’s status as a top motorsport competitor.

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting