First baby born under the NHS receives both doses of Covid-19 vaccine

Claire Hayhurst, PA
·2-min read

The first baby born under the NHS more than 70 years ago has praised staff after receiving both of her Covid-19 vaccinations.

Aneira Thomas, 72, was born at Glanamman hospital in West Wales at one minute past midnight on July 5 in 1948, and named after Aneurin Bevan – the founder of the National Health Service.

Grandmother Mrs Thomas, who went on to become a nurse, paid tribute to the work of the NHS after receiving the second dose of her Covid-19 jab at the mass vaccination centre at the Canolfan Gorseinon Centre.

The centre is run by Swansea Bay University Health Board.

Aneira Thomas receiving the second dose of her Covid-19 jab at the mass vaccination centre at the Canolfan Gorseinon Centre
Aneira Thomas receiving the second dose of her Covid-19 jab at the mass vaccination centre at the Canolfan Gorseinon Centre (Swansea Bay University Health Board/PA)

“I’ve just had my second jab and want to say thank you to everyone,” she said.

“The staff at the vaccination centre were wonderful. They were very informative and kind. They know everyone is on pins initially, waiting to have the vaccine, so they are very reassuring.

“It went very well although I lost sleep over having the vaccine initially because I suffer from a severe allergic reaction to various drugs. I thought deeply about it but decided I had to give it a try.

“I also spoke to my GP and he assured me that I shouldn’t be allergic to this vaccine. He put my mind to rest and was proved to be right.”

She urged people who were hesitant about the vaccine to take it and praised researchers and scientists who she said had “been amazing”.

Mrs Thomas also thanked health professionals and key workers across the UK for their service throughout the pandemic.

The grandmother has written a book, entitled Hold On Edna!, after her mother who waited to ensure she was born on the right side of midnight to become the first NHS baby.