Fishmongers' Hall: Prison worker describes chasing London Bridge attacker with narwhal tusk during victims' inquest

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A prison service worker has described the moment he attacked a would-be suicide bomber with a narwhal tusk on London Bridge and then leapt on him to try and stop him setting off his device.

Darryn Frost, a communications manager for the Prison and Probation Service, charged at Usman Khan and then jumped on top of him, believing he was waiting for police to arrive before setting off his bomb.

Khan, 28, had already fatally stabbed Jack Merritt, 25, and Saskia Jones, 23, graduates on a Cambridge University prison rehabilitation project, as well as wounding three others during a conference at Fishmongers' Hall on 29 November 2019.

Mr Frost told the inquest into their deaths that he had taken a narwhal tusk from the wall of the hall and rushed down the stairs to confront Khan, who was chased out on to the street.

"I just ran at full sprint towards him," he said. "He realised he could not catch up with the public who were running away. He then raised the knives up and started running towards me.

"He raised the knives so much, there was a tiny piece of skin. Time slowed down so much I could see his every movement and I was able to aim at that flesh on the right side and as he ran towards me I thrust [the tusk] into him.

"He didn't seem to react the first moment it penetrated him but the force of it made him buckle over. He dropped the knives slightly.

"The pain didn't strike him when I stabbed him.

"It struck him when I pulled it out - he looked up at me as if he was shocked to be in pain."

At that point John Crilly, a former prisoner who had pursued Khan from the hall, let off a fire extinguisher in Khan's face, and Steve Gallant, a prisoner on day release, grabbed him and pulled him to the ground.

Other members of the public arrived and stamped on Khan's hands to force him to release the two kitchen knives he had used in the attack, as armed police arrived on the scene.

"I knew he had an explosive device he had threatened us with and I didn't want him setting it off," Mr Frost added.

"I shouted something to say, 'I've got his hands, he can't kill anyone else, I won't let him kill anyone else'.

"I didn't want him to be shot because his statement that he was waiting for the police made me believe that he wanted to die.

"I didn't want to give him the satisfaction of his choice when he had taken that choice away from others."

Mr Frost was later dragged off Khan by a police officer, whose colleagues released a Taser and then shot Khan twice.

The inquests continue.