Former Aberdeen city centre offices to be turned into new flats despite noise concerns

The floors above the ASPC shop are set to be converted from former offices into flats
-Credit: (Image: Google)


Plans to turn former city centre offices into new apartments have been approved by Aberdeen City Council despite concerns over noise levels.

The building, situated on the corner of Holburn Street and Alford Place, previously saw property group ASPC move into the shop space on the ground floor.

Above however, three floors of former office space remained empty, but developers have now been given the go-ahead to convert the rooms into new city centre flats.

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The latest approval comes following similar plans being put forward to turn derelict office space above the new Tag Heuer shop on the corner of Belmont Street were put to councillors.

As well, space above the Union Street Co-op near the Music Hall is also undergoing works to make use of upper Union Street floors as part of a wider project to revive the Granite Mile.

Now, three flats will be formed on each floor above the property shop on Holburn Street, with the space currently left vacant.

Plans will see three flats contain two bedrooms and six with just one bedroom above what was previously as TSB bank branch before ASPC took over the ground floor.

It has been a two-year process for the applicant, who has finally been able to see plans begin to move closer to fruition.

The delay was prompted by concerns over noise levels, with the building next to the busy junction at the top of Union Street and the popular College Bar and Babylon night-time venues.

Experts warned of the potential for 'unforeseeable occasions' when excessive noise can be heard by residents who would move into the flats.

It was however agreed that the introduction of double glazing and a "closed window strategy" could allow future residents to live "in a suitable acoustic environment."

You can view more on the plans here.