Frightened Rabbit album honoured for its enduring influence

·2-min read

Scotland’s top musicians have honoured Frightened Rabbit’s second studio album with a new award for its enduring influence.

The Selkirk indie-rock band’s 2008 release, The Midnight Organ Fight, was awarded the inaugural Modern Scottish Classic Award after voting by the 10 artists shortlisted for the Scottish Album of the Year (SAY).

The record, which includes songs the Modern Leper and Keep Yourself Warm, was chosen as an album from Scotland’s past which still inspires music being made today.

Frightened Rabbit’s lead singer Scott Hutchison died by suicide aged 36 in 2018 after suffering with mental health issues, and bandmates have since said the band “doesn’t exist” without him.

It comes as the final 10 albums for the coveted award and £20,000 cash prize were announced on Thursday after being whittled down from 327 submissions.

The winner of the national prize, now in its 10th year, will be announced in a ceremony at Edinburgh’s Usher Hall on Saturday October 23.

The shortlist is:

AiiTee – Love Don’t Fall

Arab Strap – As Days Get Dark

Biffy Clyro – A Celebration of Endings

Joesef – Does It Make You Feel Good?

Lizzie Reid – Cubicle

Mogwai – As The Love Continues

Rachel Newton – To The Awe

Stanley Odd – STAY ODD

The Ninth Wave – Happy Days!

The Snuts – W.L.

The winner of the public vote was Stanley Odd’s STAY ODD, with the remaining nine albums chosen by a judging panel which includes the author Ian Rankin, poet Jackie Kay, actor Daniel Portman, comedian Ashley Storrie, as well as The Charlatans singer Tim Burgess.

Robert Kilpatrick, creative projects and communications director at the Scottish Music Industry Association, said: “The SAY Award Shortlist comprises 10 of the best Scottish records of the last year; all released throughout the pandemic.

“With some of the biggest names in Scottish music featured alongside some of our nation’s most exciting rising talents, 2021’s Shortlist showcases the exciting, diverse and resilient nature of our music community despite 18 months of significant challenges.

“It firmly recognises music’s cultural impact and life-changing value, and brings to the forefront a recorded output that all of us in Scotland can – and should – feel proud of.”

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