Gen Z demands honest bosses — but they’re still going to quit on them

New data from tech company Jabra shows that the Gen Z workforce, which is beginning to outnumber older generations, doesn't put much stock in working for a seasoned leader — or sticking around a job for very long.
New data from tech company Jabra shows that the Gen Z workforce, which is beginning to outnumber older generations, doesn't put much stock in working for a seasoned leader -- or sticking around a job for very long.

They’ve made an executive decision.

New data from tech company Jabra shows that the Gen Z workforce, which is beginning to outnumber older generations, doesn’t put much stock in working for a seasoned leader — or sticking around a job for very long.

The latest report from 14 countries, including the US, found that less than 1 in 10 Gen Zers value experience and knowledge as a critical quality in their manager.

Even fewer consider longevity with a company to be important.

Instead, these 20-somethings are desperately searching for a manager of good integrity. They value honesty five times as much as years of career expertise, according to the research.

Gen Zers demand honesty from their bosses, even though many don’t plan on staying in their roles for very long. Getty Images
Gen Zers demand honesty from their bosses, even though many don’t plan on staying in their roles for very long. Getty Images

Additionally, Gen Z is pushing for routine check-ins with their bosses as a way to boost morale.

“One meaningful conversation a week with someone’s manager can make all the difference between their sense of connection and belonging, or disengagement with work,” the researchers wrote.

“It’s more important now than ever that leaders make time for honest, empathetic and transparent conversations,” they added. “Employees in our survey said that even chat messages or online catch-ups can help nurture this sense of belonging.”

Despite these efforts, about half the younger crowd will be at different companies by the year’s end. Jabra’s data found that 48% of Gen Zers intend to leave their jobs this year, despite 7 in 10 reporting feelings of satisfaction. Another 52% feel burned out by work.

Unrelated research on burnout found that many employees of all ages no longer feel like they are able to unplug from their jobs during time off.

And a study by automaker Ford saw that half of the global workforce would accept a 20% reduction in pay to improve their quality of life.

Gen Z employees take little value in working for an experienced leader, new data shows. Getty Images
Gen Z employees take little value in working for an experienced leader, new data shows. Getty Images

However, this is not the case with Gen Z.

Jabra found that only 1 in 3 young people think of work-life balance as “an important measure.”

Despite TikTok and social media trends that promote coasting by in your position, 82% of Gen Z “say that career achievements are important to their sense of identity and success.”