Gov. Hochul confronted by mourner at NYPD Officer Jonathan Diller’s wake, crowd applauds as she leaves

Gov. Kathy Hochul was filmed being confronted by an emotional mourner on her way out of a short visit to the wake for slain NYPD hero Jonathan Diller Friday afternoon – with bystanders applauding as she made her exit.

The unidentified man dressed in a black suit gestured firmly and was visibly agitated as he spoke to the Democratic lawmaker, according to footage of the incident.

The tense clash received support from a group of onlookers gathered outside the venue, who clapped as the mourner as the blank-faced governor shuffled back to her car.

A man is seen confronting Kathy Hochul on her way out of the wake. Dennis Clark for the NYPost
A man is seen confronting Kathy Hochul on her way out of the wake. Dennis Clark for the NYPost
The unidentified man dressed in a black suit gestured firmly and was visibly agitated. Dennis A. Clark
The unidentified man dressed in a black suit gestured firmly and was visibly agitated. Dennis A. Clark

Hochul — who had asked the NYPD, the NYPD Police Benevolent Association, and the Nassau County Police Benevolent Association ahead of time about attending — arrived at the Massapequa Funeral Home on Long Island for the second day of viewing around 1:45 p.m..

While at the emotional event, Hochul had an “animated” conversation with Diller’s  29-year-old widow, Stephanie, one witness told The Post.

“[It looked] like she was telling [Hochul] off,” they said of the tense exchange. “It didn’t look like the widow had a kind word to say.”

Hochul left immediately after that, the individual claimed.

Another source, however, said they saw the governor having a “short, respectful conversation” with the devastated family.

“She greeted the family members, then walked out,” they told The Post, noting that she was inside for “10 to 15 minutes.”

“It was a brief respectful visit. She was not asked to leave,” the source added of the incident outside.

It was initially believed that the governor was asked to leave, in a telling reflection of the leader’s frosty reception.

Several cops waiting outside the funeral home then clapped as he walked away. Dennis A. Clark for NY Post
Several cops waiting outside the funeral home then clapped as he walked away. Dennis A. Clark for NY Post

Sources said Hochul discussed “policy” with the grieving family. Progressive policies, such as bail reform, have been blamed for Diller’s tragic death.

Hochul’s brief stop came one day after former President Donald Trump paid his respects at the first day of viewings – where he stayed for around 40 minutes.

The real estate mogul – who told The Post he was invited to the wake by the family – spent time talking to Stephanie and even met the couple’s young son, Ryan.

Ahead of Friday’s proceedings, Diller’s brother-in-law shared

.

“No words needed,” Jonathan McAuley, who is also an NYPD officer, captioned the post.

Trump referred to the murdered cop as a “great officer, top of his class.”

Mourners lining up outside the Massapequa Funeral Home in remembrance of slain NYPD officer Jonathan Diller. Dennis A. Clark for NY Post
Mourners lining up outside the Massapequa Funeral Home in remembrance of slain NYPD officer Jonathan Diller. Dennis A. Clark for NY Post
Diller was fatally shot during a routine traffic stop in Queens on March 25.
Diller was fatally shot during a routine traffic stop in Queens on March 25.

“I said something has to come out of it, and the only thing that you could really think that could come out of it is we get stronger and tougher so this doesn’t keep happening,” he told The Post of his conversation with Stephanie.

In the days since Diller’s killing, Hochul has come under fire as the face of controversial bail reform, which law enforcement blames for the rise in recidivism.

Despite her own efforts to roll back the reforms, Hochul has failed to cut down the changes that many argue allow violent criminals onto the street and put cops and everyday New Yorkers at risk.

The prime suspect in Diller’s murder – 34-year-old Guy Rivera – has at least 21 prior arrests and did a five-year prison stint.

At the time of the shooting, Rivera was seated in a Kia driven by 41-year-old Lindy Jones, who was previously convicted of attempted murder but was let loose on $75,000 bail for an illegal gun charge last spring.

Mayor Eric Adams – a former NYPD captain – lashed out at Albany for its lackadaisical approach to bail reform and recidivism at a somber press conference on Tuesday.

A group of mourners hug as they attend the wake on Friday. Dennis A. Clark for NY Post
A group of mourners hug as they attend the wake on Friday. Dennis A. Clark for NY Post

“What’s interesting is that our practices, laws and policies are not going after these issues,” Hizzoner said.

“We’ve always had a problem with recidivism, it’s always been a problem but we’ve really never zeroed in on it with case after case,” he told reporters.

Ahead of the weekend services, Sergeants Benevolent Association President Vincent J. Vallelong also wrote a scathing letter warning members of City Council not to show their faces.

The wake took place at the Massapequa Funeral Home in Massapequa, NY. Dennis A. Clark for NY Post
The wake took place at the Massapequa Funeral Home in Massapequa, NY. Dennis A. Clark for NY Post

“Adrienne Adams, Jumaane Williams and their cohorts should stay home,”  he told The Post, namechecking the two local lawmakers who pushed the council to reject Mayor Eric Adams’ veto on the “How Many Stops” Act in January.

“They detest cops and have no appreciation for what they do. They should stay home and not pretend they are grieving. They have caused enough heartbreak and destruction,” Vallelong insisted, adding that their presence “is a stain on the legacy of a true hero who made the ultimate sacrifice.”