What happens to royal warrants issued by the Queen?

·2-min read
Did the Queen enjoy tomato ketchup? Heinz was one of the brands given the royal warrant  (PA) (PA Media)
Did the Queen enjoy tomato ketchup? Heinz was one of the brands given the royal warrant (PA) (PA Media)

Royal warrants bestowed by the Queen have long been a mark of noble service – one that has come to a close.

In the new chapter of the British monarchy, following Queen Elizabeth II’s death, the companies awarded warrants are likely to change.

Since the 15th century, when they were first issued, royal warrants have been awarded to those who supply goods to the Queen and royal households.

There are currently more than 800 grantees from a range of commercial industries, British and otherwise, which have received the stamp of approval.

From fishmongers to software providers, the late Queen awarded 620 royal warrants during her platinum reign. Chosen grantors, who were the Duke of Edinburgh, the Prince of Wales and the Queen Mother, could also issue warrants.

Companies chosen may display the royal coat of arms on their packaging for a minimum of five years or until their warrant is cancelled.

What happens to royal warrants issued by the Queen?

Another condition faces warranted companies, following the Queen’s death. All warrants given by Queen Elizabeth II have become null and void after her passing, according to the Royal Warrant Holders Association.

This was the case with her husband, Prince Philip, whose 38 granted warrants became void upon his death in April 2021.

Royal insignia may be used on packaging, websites and official documents for the next two years. But it is not clear if warrants granted by the Prince of Wales may continue with the King’s emblem or will require renewal.

Who was granted warrants under Queen Elizabeth II?

The Queen granted hundreds of warrants under her name, some lasting less than a year.

Although they may organise new appointments with the King, many companies will now lose out on their royal insignia and may have to alter their packaging.

Some major food companies have held the honour, including Heinz, Coca-Cola, Cadbury, Unilever and Fortnum & Mason.

Booze was not left out, with plenty of drinks companies awarded warrants such as Dubonnet, Martini, Gordon’s, Pimm’s and nine champagne brands.

You can find the full directory of companies with royal warrants on the Royal Warrant Holders Association website.