GMB doctor issues warning about popular heatwave hack people are using to keep cool in bed

Caroline Allen
·Contributor
·3-min read

Sleeping in a heatwave is no easy feat.

As the UK braces itself for another few days of scorching temperatures, we’re all looking for ways to have a half-decent (we’ll even take mildly acceptable at this point) sleep.

Along with the rest of us, Good Morning Britain’s host, Kate Garraway, confessed she has been sleeping terribly since the start of the heatwave.

The 53-year-old even admitted to dipping her sheets in cold water before bed.

But Dr Sarah Jarvis offered a warning to people looking for ways to cool down, advising hot Britons to avoid putting ice directly onto their skin.

Does anybody sleep well in a heatwave? (Getty Images)
Does anybody sleep well in a heatwave? (Photo posed by model - Getty Images)

Read more: Here’s how to totally remove sand from your feet in a few seconds

Speaking on the ITV show on Tuesday 11 August, Dr Jarvis also suggested it was better to have a “cool shower” than a “cold shower” before bed, explaining that you’ll still feel the benefits.

“We don't want to have a really cold shower. If you have a cool shower and then allow the water to evaporate off your skin, it will definitely help cool you down,” Dr Jarvis explained.

A popular idea amongst the Good Morning Britain team was to fill a hot water bottle with cold water and put it in the freezer.

“It does work, it does help definitely,” said Garraway, who has tried every trick in the book for a cool night sleep.

Dr Sarah Jarvis warned people to avoid putting ice directly onto their skin. (Photo posed by model - Getty Images)
Dr Sarah Jarvis warned people to avoid putting ice directly onto their skin. (Photo posed by model - Getty Images)

Read more: What are the signs and symptoms of heatstroke?

But Dr Jarvis warned: “Please don't forget; never put ice directly onto your skin because that can cause ice burns.”

If people do choose to put hot water bottles in the fridge, they need to make sure they wrap them with a tea-towel or put some sort of fabric on top before placing them on their skin.

The same rule applies for sheets.

“A cool flannel around your neck, and possibly putting sheets in the freezer, but not risking any ice burns, can help,” Dr Jarvis adds.

Read more: Why sleeping with a fan might be bad for your health

Speaking about some of the ways she has tried to keep cool in this bout of warm weather, Garraway admitted she has dipped her sheets in cold water before bed.

“I tried the whole dipping your bed sheet in water, it does work a bit but then you get too chilly,” she explained.

With the hot weather set to continue before making way to thunderstorms later in the week, the top suggestions seem to centre around the freezer.

Usually used for leftovers and must-have heatwave ice lollies, the freezer can double up as a nice space to keep sheets and hot water bottles as temperatures soar.

No space? You’ll just have to finish off the ice lollies.

Subscribe Now
Subscribe Now

Watch the latest videos from Yahoo UK Lifestyle