Human remains at Greenwich recycling centre turn out to be skeleton from dentist's Surgery

Jacob Jarvis
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Human remains at Greenwich recycling centre turn out to be skeleton from dentist's Surgery

Human remains at Greenwich recycling centre turn out to be skeleton from dentist's Surgery

Human remains found at a recycling centre in London turned out to be parts of a skeleton that was thrown out from a dentist's surgery.

Staff were “sifting through waste and came across a bin bag with the remains inside," it was reported yesterday.

"Apparently there was a jawbone with some teeth and a leg bone," a source told the Sun.

But it turns out the skeleton belonged to a dentist who had used it for medical training before he came to the UK in the 1960s, police said today.

Scotland Yard forensics teams had been investigating after the remains were found in Greenwich.

The remains were found to be human, and police reached out to a rubbish contractor who dumped the waste.

They told police the skeleton came from a clear-out of the dentist's surgery, which had been abandoned for around a decade.

Officers contacted the dentist, who is now retired, who confirmed the bones had been used in his medical training in India and he had brought them with him to the UK in the 1960s.

​The find has now deemed "non-suspicious".

Police had been called to the facility, in Nathan Way, Thameshead, shortly after 11am on Tuesday.