Hundreds attend funeral of Solihull D-Day war hero Albert Price after appeal for people to attend

-Credit: (Image: Claire Hayhurst/PA Wire)
-Credit: (Image: Claire Hayhurst/PA Wire)


Hundreds of people turned out for the funeral of a D-Day veteran from Solihull after an appeal was launched urging people to attend. Standard bearers escorted the hearse carrying Albert Price into his funeral service at Robin Hood Crematorium yesterday, May 31.

It comes after an appeal was made by Military Lions, an official Aston Villa supporters group for the armed forces, urging people to attend the 98-year-old's service and give him a "proper send off". The war veteran leaves behind a wife and a daughter.

Mr Price was a gunner with the Royal Dragon Guards when he landed on Gold Beach aged 18 on June 6, 1944. He was part of a D-Day test run in April 1944 on Studland Beach in Dorset.

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Military Lions described Mr Price as a “brave and unassuming man”. The group added: "He was one of the first to step onto Gold Beach in Normandy.

"Two days later, Albert’s tank came under attack, with seven of the nine tanks in his squadron being destroyed including his own, by Germen Panzers. His colleagues were injured and killed - and Albert was shot.

D-Day veteran Albert Price, with his wife Betty Price, returning to the seafront on Gold Beach in Arromanches-les-Bains, France -Credit:Claire Hayhurst/PA Wire
D-Day veteran Albert Price, with his wife Betty Price, returning to the seafront on Gold Beach in Arromanches-les-Bains, France -Credit:Claire Hayhurst/PA Wire

"He lost many friends. Despite his many experiences on D-Day and afterwards across Europe, Albert’s prominent memory was of ‘feeling proud to have been there'."

Speaking about his involvement in D-Day, Mr Price said last year: "I can still remember driving the tank on to the beach in Normandy and having to zig-zag to avoid mines and shells flying straight at us. I will never forget that day; scrambling for safety after our tank got hit.

"I had to push my commander up out of the hatch and suffered shrapnel wounds in the process. I will always remember those young chaps I served with.

"They lost their lives so we could live. With the 80th anniversary of the landings coming up next year, it’s so important to remember those that never came home and sacrificed themselves for the greater good.

“Going back to Normandy with the Royal British Legion in 2019 was an experience I will never forget and I want to go back again. I hope as many D-Day veterans as possible sign up to attend the commemorations next year. I want the legacy of those I served with to be remembered.”