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Swedish ferry operator Stena Line says it has converted one of its ships to enable it to run on methanol, testing the potenti…

  • London Zoo opens new Lemur enclosure Adam Justice - IB Times - 7 hours ago
    London Zoo opens new Lemur enclosure

    London Zoo's new In with the Lemurs enclosure allowed visitors to get up-close and personal with the furry animals from Madagascar. Malcolm Fitzatrick, the curator of mammals at London Zoo, said that it was a chance for visitors to "actually walk through the Lemurs' environment". "I mean I'm sure if you've watched the …

  • Pilot Bertrand Piccard waves from Solar Impulse 2, the world's only solar powered aircraft, before taking off from Mandalay International Airport in Myanmar on March 30, 2015

    Solar Impulse 2 took off from Myanmar's second biggest city of Mandalay early Monday and headed for China's Chongqing, the fifth flight of a landmark journey to circumnavigate the globe powered solely by the sun.

  • A WWF activist dressed as a panda bear stands next to an illuminated globe in front of the Brandenburger Gate in Berlin during the the global climate change awareness campaign Earth Hour on March 28, 2015

    The Empire State Building dimmed its lights and the Eiffel Tower went dark as iconic landmarks across the world observed Earth Hour, the global climate change awareness campaign.

  • Nguyen Hien Thien works on his rice field in the southern Mekong delta province of Can Tho

    Rice farmer Nguyen Hien Thien is so busy growing his crops that he has never even visited Can Tho, a town only a few miles from his farm in the southern Mekong Delta.

  • Experts: Sex bias case will embolden women despite verdict SUDHIN THANAWALA - Associated Press - Sat, Mar 28, 2015
    Ellen Pao, center, walks to Civic Center Courthouse in San Francisco, Friday, March 27, 2015. The jury are due back in court on Friday in Pao's lawsuit against Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. Pao says the firm discriminated against her because she was a woman and then retaliated by denying her a promotion and firing her when she complained about gender bias. Kleiner Perkins denies the allegations. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A long legal battle over accusations that a prominent Silicon Valley venture capital firm demeaned women and held them to a different standard than their male colleagues became a flashpoint in the ongoing discussion about gender inequity at elite technology and venture capital firms.

  • In NYC, an unusual task force fights home-as-hotel rentals JENNIFER PELTZ - Associated Press - Sat, Mar 28, 2015
    Fashion icon Audrey Smaltz listens during a interview in her rooftop penthouse at the Branson building, Tuesday, March 24, 2015, in New York. Smaltz, who is being pressured to move, is a permanent tenant in the building where the city is suing the landlord, saying a swath of the apartments were being used as hotel rooms. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

    NEW YORK (AP) — From an office by the Brooklyn Bridge, a specialized team of investigators tackles a fast-growing concern in the nation's biggest city: apartments being rented like hotel rooms.

  • Jury says Silicon Valley firm did not discriminate SUDHIN THANAWALA - Associated Press - Sat, Mar 28, 2015
    Ellen Pao, center, walks to Civic Center Courthouse in San Francisco, Friday, March 27, 2015. The jury are due back in court on Friday in Pao's lawsuit against Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. Pao says the firm discriminated against her because she was a woman and then retaliated by denying her a promotion and firing her when she complained about gender bias. Kleiner Perkins denies the allegations. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A jury decided Friday that a prestigious venture capital firm did not discriminate or retaliate against a female employee in a case that debated gender imbalance and working conditions for women in Silicon Valley.

  • Altera stock soars on report of sales talks with Intel Associated Press - Fri, Mar 27, 2015

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Altera's stock soared to its highest price in nearly four years Friday on a report the chipmaker is in talks to be sold to industry leader Intel.

  • Internet outages reveal gaps in US broadband infrastructure FELICIA FONSECA and DAVID A. LIEB - Associated Press - Fri, Mar 27, 2015
    Mike Loucks poses in his home space exploration engineering office, with a tangle of dedicated cables behind, Thursday, March 26, 2015, in Friday Harbor, Wash., in the San Juan Islands. Loucks lost Internet and phone service during a 10-day outage on the island in 2013. Other regions around the country also have fallen dark in recent years, sometimes for days at a time, because of failures or accidents affecting the nation’s broadband infrastructure. The failures have revealed vulnerabilities in the backbone of the nation’s high-speed Internet highway, which often lacks the detour routes necessary to quickly restore service when outages occur outside of major cities. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

    FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — When vandals sliced a fiber-optic cable in the Arizona desert last month, they did more than time-warp thousands of people back to an era before computers, credit cards or even phones. They exposed a glaring vulnerability in the nation's Internet infrastructure: no backup systems in many pla …

  • Jury: Silicon Valley firm didn't discriminate Sudhin Thanawala, Associated Press - Associated Press - Fri, Mar 27, 2015
    Jury says Silicon Valley firm did not discriminate

    A jury says a prestigious venture capital firm did not discriminate or retaliate against a female employee in a case that drew attention to gender imbalance and working conditions for women in Silicon ...

  • This undated picture released by World Wildlife Fund shows a finless porpoise in captivity at the Research Centre for Aquatic Biodiversity and Resource Conservation of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Wuhan

    Chinese authorities on Friday began relocating the country's rare finless porpoise population in a bid to revive a species threatened by pollution, overfishing and heavy traffic in their Yangtze River habitat, state media reported.

  • Technology to look inside Fukushima reactors faces challenge YURI KAGEYAMA - Associated Press - Fri, Mar 27, 2015
    Muon drift tubes are seen on an equipment shown to journalists by Toshiba officials at its research center in Yokohama near Tokyo Friday, March 27, 2015. Toshiba says the drift tubes detect muons and send data to electronic boards to map an image of the melted fuel at the Fukushima reactors, using subatomic particles called muons. The cutting-edge technology was billed as a way to decipher where exactly the morass of nuclear fuel might sit at the bottom of the Japanese power plant that went into multiple meltdowns four years ago. But what went wrong, even in a simple demonstration for reporters Friday for the 500 million yen ($5 million) project, was a sobering reminder of the enormous challenges that lie for the decommissioning of Fukushima Dai-ichi. (AP Photo/Emily Wang)

    YOKOHAMA, Japan (AP) — The cutting-edge technology was billed as a way to decipher where exactly the morass of nuclear fuel might sit at the bottom of reactors in the Japanese power plant that went into multiple meltdowns four years ago.

  • Valeo's self-driving car systems learn from Safran drones By Laurence Frost and Gilles Guillaume - Reuters - Fri, Mar 27, 2015
    The new self-driving car unveiled by Valeo and Safran drives during a presentation in front of the Invalides in Paris

    By Laurence Frost and Gilles Guillaume PARIS (Reuters) - French auto parts maker Valeo plans to draw on drone software and other military technologies from partner Safran to offer self-driving vehicle platforms to carmakers by the end of the decade. While demonstrating an autonomous car and other prototype systems jointly …

  • Things to know about Internet vulnerabilities in the US The Associated Press - Associated Press - Fri, Mar 27, 2015

    Internet outages can disrupt emergency services, business transactions and basic communication. Here are few things to know about the nation's Internet infrastructure and its vulnerabilities.

  • Backup options for Internet lines can be costly, complicated DAVID A. LIEB - Associated Press - Fri, Mar 27, 2015
    Cables connecting phone, cable and Internet service come out of a wall connector in the home space exploration engineering office of Mike Loucks Thursday, March 26, 2015, in Friday Harbor, Wash., in the San Juan Islands. Loucks lost Internet and phone service during a 10-day outage on the island in 2013. Other regions around the country also have fallen dark in recent years, sometimes for days at a time, because of failures or accidents affecting the nation’s broadband infrastructure. The failures have revealed vulnerabilities in the backbone of the nation’s high-speed Internet highway, which often lacks the detour routes necessary to quickly restore service when outages occur outside of major cities. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

    Hunter Newby describes himself as a real estate entrepreneur, even if he's not marketing houses or land. Instead, he's selling space on a new fiber-optic transmission line to Internet providers, telecommunications companies and anyone wanting high-speed data.