Iraqi man with uncontrollable twitch in head is cured after 10-hour-long operation

A 28-year-old Iraqi man, who suffered from a rare neurological disorder, which made his upper body and head twitch uncontrollably, has found a cure in an Indian hospital.

Saad Harbi Haid Al-Karawi was diagnosed with dystonia, a genetic disorder, which makes muscles contract involuntarily, causing repetitive or twisting movement.

He started experiencing the symptoms 14-years-ago, which aggravated steadily. He had been bedridden for three-years and had continuous abnormal movement when he was brought to Fortis Memorial Research Institute (FMRI) in Gurugram in northern India.

A team of doctors led by neurosurgeon Dr Sandeep Vaishya examined him and suggested a procedure Bilateral Globus Pellidus Internus (GPI) Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) to cure him of his condition.

DBS is a surgical procedure where electrodes are placed deep inside the brain. This complex surgery has a margin of error of less than 0.5 mm. Once placed, they are then connected to an implant placed in the chest.

Dr Sandeep Vaishya said: “It took 8 to 10 hours to implant the device. The device now delivers carefully controlled electrical stimulation to targeted areas in the brain. He has shown visible signs of recovery within a week after the surgery.”

Al-Karawi has been cured of his tremors and is now able to walk independently with crutches.

Al-Karawi said: “I am extremely happy that my condition has recovered to this extent. I can now walk and do all the normal activities like anyone else.”