Jackdaw died after being shot twice by air rifle with distinctive pellets in County Durham

The RSPCA is appealing for information after a jackdaw died after being shot by an air rifle.
-Credit: (Image: RSPCA)


A jackdaw was killed after being shot twice by an air rifle in County Durham.

The bird was discovered in the front garden of a property in the Arundel Drive area of Darlington, suffering from severe wounds after being shot on Sunday, May 26 at around 1.45pm. Vets were unable to treat the bird’s injuries with one of the pellets having shattered the pelvis bone and the other becoming lodged in the humerus.

Sadly, it was decided the jackdaw would be put to sleep to end the animal’s suffering. As it is the breeding and nesting season for jackdaws, the deceased bird may have had offspring which may now struggle to survive.

The RSPCA hopes that the distinctive air rifle pellets used in the shooting may provide a clue to track down the perpetrators. The ammunition removed from the bird has a 'Mitsubishi' type symbol engraved.

The RSPCA is appealing for information after a jackdaw died after being shot by an air rifle.
The RSPCA is appealing for information after a jackdaw died after being shot by an air rifle. -Credit:RSPCA

RSPCA Animal Rescue Officer (ARO) Krissy Raine, who is appealing for information, said: “This poor jackdaw was found in a horrendous state after being shot. The bird was rushed to Stanhope Park Veterinary Hospital by the member of the public who found the bird, but sadly the jackdaw was too badly wounded to make a recovery.

“The consequences of weapons being used on wildlife is devastating, with severe injuries often leading to death, as in this case. Over the past year residents in this area of Darlington have reported numerous birds and cats have been shot with air rifles. Some have been killed and others have been seriously injured.

“People are understandably concerned and fear that their pets or even children could be hurt. We are appealing for anyone with any information to get in touch by calling the RSPCA appeals line number on 0800 123 8018.”