• Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.

Jemima Kirke says having intimacy coordinators on set ‘sanitises’ creativity

·1-min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.

Jemima Kirke has suggested that the use of intimacy coordinators on film and TV sets “sanitises” creativity for actors.

The former Girls star is in the upcoming series Conversations with Friends, adapted from the Sally Rooney novel of the same name.

In the programme, Kirke plays a writer named Melissa, who is stuck in a loveless marriage with husband Nick (played by Joe Alwyn).

In a recent interview, the actor spoke out about the use of intimacy coordinators on set – a practice that ensures the well-being of actors during sex scenes or other intimate on camera moments.

“Things are much more sanitised and everyone is protecting their a***s,” she told The Telegraph.

“My view is that you don’t always have to be comfortable on a movie set as an actor. I don’t know where to draw the line but it’s definitely a blurry one.”

She went on to explain her view that the discomfort of actors during intimate moments isn’t necessarily something to avoid, as it is part of being “present” in the scene.

Bobbi, Nick, Frances, Melissa in ‘Conversations with Friends’ (BBC)
Bobbi, Nick, Frances, Melissa in ‘Conversations with Friends’ (BBC)

Kirke continued: “[As an actor] you’re supposed to be present in your emotions in that moment… I think maybe we are making discomfort into a negative thing.”

In the years since the #MeToo movement, the use of intimacy coordinators has been publicised in several productions, including in Normal People, the popular 2020 series based on Rooney’s second novel.

Conversations with Friends will premiere 15 May on BBC in the UK and Hulu in the US.

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting