Jewish lawyer touted by Roy Moore's wife turns out to be 'passionate supporter' of his opponent Doug Jones

Andrew Buncombe
Kayla Moore was her husband's strongest supporter: Getty

A Jewish lawyer who once worked for Roy Moore and was touted by his campaign as proof he could therefore not be antisemitic, has revealed that he is a long-time friend of the former judge’s victorious opponent and voted for him.

In the days before last month’s special election for a vacant senate seat for Alabama, Mr Moore, a conservative evangelical Christian, was accused of making antisemitic comments.

To try and counter the claims, Mr Moore’s wife, Kayla, who had been an outspoken defender of her husband after he was accused of sexually abusing young girls and women - claims he stridently denied - said one of their legal acquaintances was Jewish.

“Fake news will tell you that we don’t care for Jews. I tell you all this because I’ve seen it also I just want to set the record straight while they’re here,” she told supporters at a rally on the eve of voting. “One of our attorneys is a Jew.”

But that lawyer, Richard Jaffe, who once apparently did some work for Republican Mr Moore’s son, has now reportedly revealed he is a long time friend of Mr Moore’s opponent, Doug Jones, and voted for him in the election that the Democrat won - the first to win a senate seat in Alabama for 25 years.

Mr Jaffe told the Washington Examiner he has been friends with Mr Jones for over 30 years and both raised and donated money to his campaign.

“There could not be a more passionate supporter of Doug than me,” he said.

The newspaper reported that he represented Mr Moore’s son Caleb in 2016. Mr Jaffe could not be immediately reached for comment.

Claims that Mr Moore, who was supported by Donald Trump’s former top strategist, Steve Bannon, was antisemitic increased after he suggested billionaire and Democratic donor George Soros, who is Jewish, was going to hell.

“He’s still going to the same place that people who don’t recognise God and morality and accept his salvation are going,” Mr Moore told supporters. “And that’s not a good place.”

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