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Queen Thanks Nation For Jubilee Celebrations

The Queen has thanked the nation for the celebrations staged for her Diamond Jubilee after the last day of festivities reached its climax.

In a televised address to the country and Commonwealth, she described the four-day extravaganza as a "humbling experience" and said she was "deeply touched" to see so many people coming together to mark the occasion.

"The events that I have attended to mark my Diamond Jubilee have been a humbling experience," she said.

"It has touched me deeply to see so many thousands of families, neighbours and friends celebrating together in such a happy atmosphere.

"But Prince Philip and I want to take this opportunity to offer our special thanks and appreciation to all those who have had a hand in organising these Jubilee celebrations.

"It has been a massive challenge, and I am sure that everyone who has enjoyed these festive occasions realises how much work has been involved.

"I hope that memories of all this year's happy events will brighten our lives for many years to come.

"I will continue to treasure and draw inspiration from the countless kindnesses shown to me in this country and throughout the Commonwealth.

"Thank you all," she added.

Recorded at the palace before the Jubilee Concert, the message of thanks was broadcast as the four days of festivities drew to a close.

Earlier, a huge roar from the crowds gathered outside along the mall - some 1.5 million people between Admiralty Arch and the palace alone - greeted the monarch's appearance.

She then watched a flypast featuring Second World War aircraft including a Dakota bomber - followed by the Red Arrows flying in diamond formation with red, white and blue-coloured smoke trails.

The Queen and her family arrived at the palace following a glittering carriage procession.

It comes as Prince Philip continues to be treated in hospital for a bladder infection.

He was unable to be part of the last of a series of events marking the monarch's 60-year milestone.

Prime Minister David Cameron said the Jubilee celebrations across the UK showed the nation pulling together and will give the country the bounce it needs in the face of a faltering economy.

He said: "What's happened this weekend is that (we have been) celebrating this great institution, Her Majesty's service of 60 years on the throne, but also seeing some of the best of British creativity, culture, music and the rest of it all at the same time.

"I think really it is the best of Britain. We have seen the country come together with a sense of celebration and unity but also tremendous resilience - resilience from people who want to celebrate despite the weather and resilience of course from Her Majesty - nothing stops her doing the job she does.

"This is something that has brought the country together and you definitely notice that in my constituency, in the smallest villages that I went to. In the whole country, everyone's talking to each other, everyone is chatting with their neighbours. It brings communities of people together, whatever your politics."

During a thanksgiving service in St Paul's Cathedral the Archbishop of Canterbury Dr Rowan Williams gave a sermon where he paid tribute to the Queen.

"In all her public engagements, our Queen has shown a quality of joy in the happiness of others. She has responded with just the generosity St Paul speaks of in showing honour to countless local communities and individuals of every background of class and race," he said.

"She has made her public happy and all the signs are that she is herself happy, fulfilled and at home in these encounters. The same of course can manifestly be said of Prince Philip and our prayers and thoughts are very much with him this morning."

Leading national figures and members of the Royal Family were among those at the service, including Prince Charles, the Duchess of Cornwall, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry.

Mr Cameron, who led a large representation from the coalition Government and other figures that included governor generals and foreign leaders, opened the service with a reading.

The Queen also attended a reception at Mansion House while other senior royals including Charles and Camilla were at a similar event at the Guildhall, with members of the thanksgiving congregation present at both.

The monarch and her family were then guests at a City of London Livery companies lunch at Westminster Hall.

The Prince of Wales paid a heartfelt tribute to his mother on Monday night, following the Diamond Jubilee concert staged near Buckingham Palace.

Standing on stage with the Queen, Charles told hundreds of thousands of concert-goers that they were "celebrating the life and service of a very special person".

But he added there was a disappointing element to the night.

"The only sad thing about this evening is that my father cannot be here with us because unfortunately he's taken unwell," he said.

After Prince Charles' speech there was a huge fireworks display fired from the roof of the palace .