Julia Bradbury to have a mastectomy after being diagnosed with breast cancer

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Julia Bradbury's diagnosis followed a mammogram she booked on an annual recall, having last year found a lump which proved to be a cluster of benign micro-cysts. - ITV
Julia Bradbury's diagnosis followed a mammogram she booked on an annual recall, having last year found a lump which proved to be a cluster of benign micro-cysts. - ITV

The Countryfile presenter Julia Bradbury will have a mastectomy after being diagnosed with breast cancer.

The 51-year-old said she felt like she was losing a part of the “experience of motherhood” as she prepared to lose the breast that fed her three children as newborns. She has a son, now 10, and twin daughters, aged six.

Bradbury has already undergone a series of biopsies and will have surgery in early October after a regular check-up found a six-centimetre tumour.

While operating, doctors will check tissue from her lymph nodes to see if the disease has spread.

She told the Mail on Sunday: "Ultimately, if a mastectomy helps you repair then it is a good thing. But it does feel like losing a part of you, part of your sexual identity and part of your experience of motherhood.”

She continued: “I still need to be a mum to my kids, a partner and a working woman. I'm still Julia.”

She detailed how doctors believe the cancer cells are only in her milk ducts and have not yet spread to the tissue of her breast, meaning it may have been caught early enough to avoid chemotherapy.

She added: "It is quite good on the scale on cancers. But as with all tumours, until you are in there you never know.

"As it is I am going to lose my breast. I trust that one day I will look down on it and think that was the fight of my life and I have the ultimate battle scar to prove it."

Bradbury's diagnosis followed a mammogram she booked in July on an annual recall, having last year found a lump which proved to be a cluster of benign micro-cysts.

She has urged other women to regularly check themselves for breast cancer and not to be afraid to seek help.

"We must, must, must check ourselves and seek help," she said.

"Being scared of a diagnosis could be the thing which kills you. So learn what to look for and check, check, check.

"Doctors are experts but only you can press a lump, know how it feels and think you should do something about it."

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