By using Yahoo you agree that Yahoo and partners may use Cookies for personalisation and other purposes

Kentucky ICED Chicken? Japanese restaurant creates meat lollies to battle heatwave

12 August 2014
A Japanese restauran decided to tackle the ice-cream market - by creating iced chicken lollies (CEN)
View photos
A Japanese restauran decided to tackle the ice-cream market - by creating iced chicken lollies (CEN)


A Japanese restaurant tried to tackle the ice lolly market head on by creating a unique treat for a hot day - iced chicken pops.

The grilled skewers of meat come in frozen blocks of gelatine so they can be licked or crunched just like an ice lolly.

Owners of the Zenyaren restaurant in Tokyo, who invented the dish, say they have became massively popular during Japan's summer heatwave.

The traditional skewers of chicken - known as yakitori – are prepared as normal but are slowly frozen in collagen blocks so they keep their popular barbecue taste.

Koma Izuma, 47, a fan of the snacks, said: ‘It is delicious especially when you are trying to keep cool on a hot day. Refreshing and nutritious at the same time - and great for your complexion.’

A standard 'two lolly' serving costs £2.50, and Japanese beauticians believe that eating collagen-rich foods helps keep skin young and wrinkle-free.

Tokyo skin expert Tatsuto Tamura explained: ‘This has been popular in Japan for generations although only now is it becoming mainstream and known in the West too.

‘People here seek out collagen enriched foods like chicken, pigs' feet or shark fin because they believe it will help their skin,’ he added.

An advertisement of the new Japanese delicacy - iced chicken lollies (CEN)
View photos
An advertisement of the new Japanese delicacy - iced chicken lollies (CEN)
The grilled skewers of meat come in frozen blocks of collagen gelatin (CEN)
View photos
The grilled skewers of meat come in frozen blocks of collagen gelatin (CEN)

 
[Woman finds swastika buttered inside her McDonald’s chicken burger]

In the US, many restaurants now serve special 'wrinkle free' menus of dishes loaded with high collagen content.

But the craze has not, however, impressed UK skin specialists, and the British Skin Foundation claims that eating collagen does not benefit the skin in any way.

Unusual Recipes playlist
Unusual Recipes playlist