Kenya Mall Massacre: New Footage Of Survivors

Sky News has obtained footage which shows the lengths some of the survivors of the Nairobi mall massacre went to in order to live.

The pictures were filmed by one of the former military personnel who helped in the rescue.

It shows how some staff in the Nakumatt supermarket climbed into the meat fridge in the butcher section and hid inside for hours to evade the shooting.

When the attackers entered the supermarket spraying bullets everywhere, the shoppers and more than 200 staff inside scattered.

They dived behind counters, hid down aisles and tried to barricade themselves into store cupboards.

One group cowered behind the meat counter. There were about eight of them.

But the footage shows a pile of mangled bodies with huge, thick pools of blood around them.

One young woman lying on her side is virtually covered in blood and there is a gaping wound in her head where a bullet has exited.

Another, this time a man, appeared to have died with his hands in front of him attempting to shield his face.

The bullets were so violent, they have broken apart his elbow and upper arm.

They appear to have all been gunned down as they tried to hide from the terrorists.

One of the security consultants there, who asked to remain anonymous because of the sensitivity of his work, told Sky News he found no bullet cartridges behind the counter where the dead lay.

But he found several in front of the counter, indicating the attackers had probably leaned over the meat display and sprayed the frightened group at virtual point-blank range.

The pictures are far too gruesome to show in any detail and are extremely hard to view but while the camera is focused on one man's legs, they appear to move.

"We were convinced everyone was dead but we were going around checking if any of the bodies were warm when these legs started twitching," said 'Max' (not his real name).

On the footage you can see two feet suddenly move, very slightly.

The man turns out to be one of the meat counter staff, Fred Bosire, who was lying on his stomach with a wound in the back of his leg, pretending he was dead so the attackers would leave him.

We met him days later in the MP Shah hospital in Nairobi.

He was sitting up in bed, smiling broadly although occasionally clutching his leg.

He told us he was too traumatised to talk about his ordeal.

He spent up to five hours lying next to shoppers and fellow workers who did not survive - and witnessed the incredible cold-hearted brutality which killed them.

'Max' told us he joined up with other off-duty security guards, former military-trained personnel and civilians who simply felt they had to help rescue those trapped inside the mall by the shooting.

Most did not know each other. Some had a vague association due to being in the same line of work but they quickly became a unit, working together for the next 12 hours alongside the Kenyan Defence Force and special forces.

Together they managed to rescue and help to safety more than 60 people.

There are so many incredible tales of bravery, of selfless courage, of indomitable spirit and the bonding of complete strangers who worked together, side by side, to save people they did not know and may never meet again.