King Charles’ handwritten note to the Queen on her coffin

·2-min read
The coffin of the Queen, draped in the Royal Standard with the Imperial State Crown and the Sovereign’s orb and sceptre as well as a handwritten note (PA) (PA Wire)
The coffin of the Queen, draped in the Royal Standard with the Imperial State Crown and the Sovereign’s orb and sceptre as well as a handwritten note (PA) (PA Wire)

King Charles paid tribute to his late mother Queen Elizabeth with a handwritten note laid on top of her coffin.

The noted which read ‘In loving and devoted memory, Charles R’ was placed amid a colourful wreath for the late monarch that Buckingham Palace said contained rosemary, English Oak and myrtle, which had been cut from a plant grown from myrtle used in Elizabeth’s wedding bouquet.

There were also gold, pink, burgundy and white flowers cut from the gardens of royal residences.Royals and heads of state from around the world gathered at London’s Westminster Abbey on Monday morning for the state funeral Queen Elizabeth’s coffin on its way to final resting place for Elizabeth, Britain’s longest serving monarch, who died aged 96.

Charles III was left close to tears during a state funeral service at Westminster Abbey, where the Archbishop of Canterbury described the Queen as having touched “a multitude of lives” and been a “joyful” figure for many.

The world’s kings, queens, presidents and prime ministers flocked to Westminster Abbey, travelling thousands of miles to bear witness to the seismic change taking place in the UK.

In his sermon, the Archbishop of Canterbury took the congregation back to a time when the Queen at the age of 21 pledged to devote her whole life to service. “Rarely has a promise been so well kept,” he remarked.

And as he pointed just behind to his left, he spoke of when the Queen was crowned in the hallowed surroundings in 1953, telling how she “began her Commonwealth silent prayer, just there at the High Altar”.

He told how she joyously touched a multitude of lives and how the royals were “grieving as every family at a funeral” but in the “brightest spotlight”.