King Charles III Has Formally Been Proclaimed The UK's New Monarch

·3-min read
King Charles III addresses Privy Council members after being proclaimed the UK's monarch. (Photo: Sky News)
King Charles III addresses Privy Council members after being proclaimed the UK's monarch. (Photo: Sky News)

King Charles III addresses Privy Council members after being proclaimed the UK's monarch. (Photo: Sky News)

King Charles III has been formally proclaimed the UK’s new monarch following a special ceremony at St. James’s Palace.

Although he automatically became King following his mother’s death on Thursday, the Accession Council - attended by around 200 Privy Councillors - had to meet to confirm his role.

Prime minister Liz Truss, Prince William and the Queen Consort were among the senior figures in attendance.

Former PMs John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, David Cameron, Theresa May and Boris Johnson were also there, as was former Scottish first minister Alex Salmond and his successor, Nicola Sturgeon.

Labour leader Keir Starmer was also in attendance, as were his predecessors Ed Miliband and Neil Kinnock.

Other dignitaries in attendance included former deputy prime minister Nick Clegg, Commons speaker Lindsay Hoyle, the Archbishop of Canterbury and senior members of the cabinet.

King Charles did not attend the ceremony, only joining after he has been proclaimed monarch, at 10am, to hold his first Privy Council meeting.

King Charles III addresses Privy Council members in the Throne Room during the Accession Council at St James's Palace (Photo: Jonathan Brady via PA Wire/PA Images)
King Charles III addresses Privy Council members in the Throne Room during the Accession Council at St James's Palace (Photo: Jonathan Brady via PA Wire/PA Images)

King Charles III addresses Privy Council members in the Throne Room during the Accession Council at St James's Palace (Photo: Jonathan Brady via PA Wire/PA Images)

As his eldest son and wife looked on, he said: “I know how deeply you, the entire nation and I think I may say the whole world, sympathise with me in the irreparable loss we have all suffered.

“It is the greatest consolation to me to know the sympathy expressed by so many to my sister and brothers and that such overwhelming affection and support should be extended to our whole family in our loss.

“To all of us as a family, as to this kingdom, and the wider family of nations of which it is a part, my mother gave an example of lifelong love and of selfless service. My mother’s reign was unequalled in its duration, its dedication and its devotion.

“Even as we grieve, we give thanks for this most faithful life. I am deeply aware of this great inheritance and of the duties and heavy responsibilities of sovereignty which have now passed to me.

“In taking up these responsibilities, I shall strive to follow the inspiring example I have been set in upholding constitutional government and to seek the peace, harmony and prosperity of the peoples of these islands, and of the Commonwealth realms and territories throughout the world.

“In this purpose, I know that I shall be upheld by the affection and loyalty of the peoples whose sovereign I have been called upon to be, and that in the discharge of these duties I will be guided by the council of their elected parliaments.

“In all this, I am profoundly encouraged by the constant support of my beloved wife.”

Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and Boris Johnson were among the former prime ministers in attendance. (Photo: Kirsty O'Connor via PA Wire/PA Images)
Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and Boris Johnson were among the former prime ministers in attendance. (Photo: Kirsty O'Connor via PA Wire/PA Images)

Tony Blair, Gordon Brown and Boris Johnson were among the former prime ministers in attendance. (Photo: Kirsty O'Connor via PA Wire/PA Images)

At 11am a principal proclamation was read in public for the first time by the Garter King of Arms from the balcony overlooking Friary Court at St James’s.

It was followed by a flurry of proclamations around the country, with the second one at City of London at the Royal Exchange at midday, and further proclamations in Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales at midday on Sunday.

Union flags will be flown at full-mast from the time of the principal proclamation at St James’s Palace until one hour after the proclamations in Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales, after which flags will return to half-mast in mourning for the death of the late Queen.

The historic ceremony took place the morning after the new king’s first address to the nation.

In it, he paid a moving tribute to his “darling Mama” the Queen as he promised to continue her “lifelong service” to the country.

This article originally appeared on HuffPost UK and has been updated.

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