La Palma Eruption: Photos Of The Volcano As It Continues Its 'Unimaginable' Path Of Destruction

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The lava flow produced by the Cumbre Vieja volcano falls into the Atlantic Ocean at Los Girres beach in Tazacorte on the Canary island of La Palma early (Photo: SUNSETS SWEDEN via AFP via Getty Images)
The lava flow produced by the Cumbre Vieja volcano falls into the Atlantic Ocean at Los Girres beach in Tazacorte on the Canary island of La Palma early (Photo: SUNSETS SWEDEN via AFP via Getty Images)

The volcanic eruption on La Palma, one of Spain’s Canary Islands, has wreaked havoc for the local population and tourists since it first began 10 days ago.

Cumbre Vieja volcano has caused the evacuation of 6,000 people from their homes on the island which they are yet to return to.

The volcano has also destroyed more than 800 buildings since erupting on September 19, along with significant infrastructure, banana plantations and roads.

A composite image shows a satellite image of the lava flow from the Cumbre Vieja volcano on the Canary Island of La Palma, Spain, after it reached the Atlantic Ocean (Photo: Reuters)
A composite image shows a satellite image of the lava flow from the Cumbre Vieja volcano on the Canary Island of La Palma, Spain, after it reached the Atlantic Ocean (Photo: Reuters)

A third opening to the volcano – which last erupted in 1971 – also burst open on Friday around 400 metres from the original eruption site, triggering a fresh wave of lava which may yet join the primary stream of lava.

Eight new earthquakes with a magnitude reaching up to 3.5 were recorded on Friday as well.

Local resident Carmen Rodriguez told Reuters: “We never thought that the volcano was going to reach our house, ever.

“There were so many people and difficulties, there was a queue.

“Thankfully we were able to take the washing machine, the fridge and a cooker that I recently bought.

“I only ask that they give us a place to live, that they give us a habitable house, nothing more.”

People watch lava flowing after the eruption of a volcano on the Canary Island of La Palma, as seen from Tijarafe, Spain (Photo: REUTERS/Borja Suarez)
People watch lava flowing after the eruption of a volcano on the Canary Island of La Palma, as seen from Tijarafe, Spain (Photo: REUTERS/Borja Suarez)

Dutch national Emilie Sweerts who lived on the island said: “It’s unimaginable that this would happen, and now we are living worse days than during Covid, which was already a bit unreal.”

The lava has rolled towards the ocean over the last 10 days, and cooled rapidly when it met the coast on Tuesday.

The eruption changed the island’s shape by creating a rocky outcrop which is more than 500 metres in width.

There are added dangers when the lava’s toxic gases meet with the ocean, although the local authorities maintain that the air remains safe to breathe on the island.

Lava flows into the sea, as seen from Tijarafe, following the eruption of a volcano on the Canary Island of La Palma, Spain (Photo: REUTERS/Borja Suarez)
Lava flows into the sea, as seen from Tijarafe, following the eruption of a volcano on the Canary Island of La Palma, Spain (Photo: REUTERS/Borja Suarez)

However, ash from the volcano is blocking sunlight for the locals and several villages remain on lockdown for their safety, as breathing difficulties and eye irritation is likely.

People have taken to wearing face masks, eye protection and umbrellas to protect against the volcanic ash.

Temporary shelters have been set up around the island for those who have been evacuated.

Smoke continues to pour out of the volcano and sulphur dioxide levels have risen in the area but do not pose a threat at the moment.

There have been no reports of deaths or injuries among the 80,000 population.

Previous eruptions have rumbled on for months.

Lava is seen through the window of a kitchen from El Paso following a volcanic eruption on the Canary Island of La Palma, Spain,  on Tuesday (Photo: Reuters)
Lava is seen through the window of a kitchen from El Paso following a volcanic eruption on the Canary Island of La Palma, Spain, on Tuesday (Photo: Reuters)
General view of the toxic cloud formed by the contact of the Cumbre Vieja volcano lava with the sea, from the viewpoint of El Time de La Palma (Photo: Europa Press News via Europa Press via Getty Images)
General view of the toxic cloud formed by the contact of the Cumbre Vieja volcano lava with the sea, from the viewpoint of El Time de La Palma (Photo: Europa Press News via Europa Press via Getty Images)
Lava flowing from a volcano that devastated the Spanish island of La Palma continue to flow to the Atlantic Ocean on Thursday (Photo: Anadolu Agency via Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)
Lava flowing from a volcano that devastated the Spanish island of La Palma continue to flow to the Atlantic Ocean on Thursday (Photo: Anadolu Agency via Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)
The lava flow of the Cumbre Vieja volcano heads towards the sea (Photo: Europa Press News via Europa Press via Getty Images)
The lava flow of the Cumbre Vieja volcano heads towards the sea (Photo: Europa Press News via Europa Press via Getty Images)
Lava flows from the Cumbre Vieja volcano towards the Atlantic Ocean on Wednesday (Photo: Europa Press News via Europa Press via Getty Images)
Lava flows from the Cumbre Vieja volcano towards the Atlantic Ocean on Wednesday (Photo: Europa Press News via Europa Press via Getty Images)

This article originally appeared on HuffPost UK and has been updated.

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