Six in ten Labour members want to abolish the monarchy, poll reveals

Queen Elizabeth leaves the Highland Games earlier this month. (Reuters)

Around 60 per cent of Labour members want to abolish the monarchy, a new poll has revealed.

The survey carried out by YouGov of 1,100 party members showed a massive 62 per cent wanted Britain to become a republic.

Only 29 per cent of those polled believed in retaining the monarchy, The Times reported.

One in five Labour members said they are “happy” or “proud” to sing the national anthem, while half said they are “bored”, “embarrassed” or “angry”.

The poll was commissioned by a campaign set to be taken over by Ian Austin (right), who quit the party in February. (Getty)

The poll was commissioned by Mainstream, a new campaign against political extremism, which is to be run by Ian Austin, who quit the party in February.

It also shows Labour Party members want to abolish Britain’s borders and the nuclear deterrent, and support a general strike to bring down the government.

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“The party of today is not the one I grew up in. It has been consumed by a culture of extremism and intolerance,” said Austin.

“Under Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership, Labour has become a safe haven for antisemites.

The Queen recently gave royal assent for Boris Johnson to prorogue Parliament. (Reuters)

“Those who have taken a stand against this corrosive evil within have been intimidated and even driven from the party but we will not be silenced.”

The Queen has been dragged into the Brexit debate in recent weeks after giving Boris Johnson royal assent to prorogue Parliament.

Mr Johnson has said it is “absolutely not true” that he misled the Queen over his reasons for suspending parliament.

The prime minister previously insisted he sought the suspension so that the government could set out a new legislative programme in a Queen’s speech on 14 October.

But a Scottish court said the prorogation was obtained for the “improper purpose of stymieing parliament”.