Labour’s shadow transport secretary admits being caught speeding in ‘girl racer’ days

Sir Keir Starmer and Louise Haigh have set out Labour's plans to bring costs down for drivers while on the campaign trail
Sir Keir Starmer and Louise Haigh have set out Labour's plans to bring costs down for drivers while on the campaign trail - STEFAN ROUSSEAU/PA

Labour’s shadow transport secretary has described her first car as a “proper girl racer” and admitted she was once caught speeding in her early 20s.

Louise Haigh revealed she drove a bright yellow Citroen Saxo Scandal when she first started driving and it took her four times to pass her driving test.

In an interview with the Mirror, Ms Haigh said the car had her name on the back windscreen.

Asked if she had ever been caught speeding, she admitted she had, but added: “But not since my very early 20s.”

Ms Haigh also described the bus as her favourite form of transport.

She said: “I do spend most of the time in my car, but my favourite would be the bus.”

As part of its plan to help drivers, Labour has pledged to fix one million potholes every year if elected on July 4 and turn the tide on the “neglect” of the UK’s roads.

The pledges will be funded by deferring the A27 bypass and instead spending the £320 million on repairs across the country.

The shadow transport secretary promises to 'get Britain moving' by ensuring reliable, affordable and accessible transport
The shadow transport secretary promised to 'get Britain moving' by ensuring reliable, affordable and accessible transport - ANNA GORDON/REUTERS

Labour has also committed to tackling soaring car insurance costs by calling in regulators.

However, the party also has a history of anti-car measures.

Labour’s war on motorists has been fronted by Sadiq Khan, whose imposition of the Ulez across London last summer was deeply unpopular in the capital.

The Ulez expansion is believed to have cost Labour its chance of seizing Boris Johnson’s Uxbridge and South Ruislip seat when the former prime minister resigned from Parliament, triggering a by-election.

Mr Khan has also spent £150 million on “secret” technology for bringing in pay-per-mile charges for drivers inside the M25, although he has consistently denied planning to introduce such a scheme.

Labour-controlled Wales has seen the imposition of a blanket 20mph speed limit on minor roads, triggering forceful public opposition that even saw speed limit signs being cut down by irate locals.

The most popular petition in the Welsh assembly’s 20-year history, with half a million signatures, urged the devolved government to revoke the lowered limit.