Live: Liz Truss to become PM after winning Tory leadership contest

·39-min read

Liz Truss has beaten former chancellor Rishi Sunak to become the new leader of the Conservative Party.

Ms Truss won with 81,326 votes from the Tory membership, to Mr Sunak’s 60,399.

The incoming prime minister promised a “bold plan” to cut taxes and grow the economy and “deliver on the energy crisis, dealing with people’s energy bills but also dealing with the long-term issues we have on energy supply”.

Outgoing Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Ms Truss will go to Balmoral, rather than Buckingham Palace, for the appointment of the new prime minister on Tuesday.

4.52pm: And that’s the end of today’s coverage marking the outcome of the Conservative Party leadership contest as Liz Truss prepares to become prime minister on Tuesday.

4.50pm:

Here is a look at what comes next for new Conservative Party leader Liz Truss.

– Monday September 5

Ms Truss is expected to spend the rest of the day finalising her choices for Cabinet and wider ministerial roles and writing her first prime ministerial speech.

– Tuesday September 6

In a break with tradition, Boris Johnson and his successor will go to Balmoral in Scotland for the appointment of the new prime minister on Tuesday, rather than Buckingham Palace.

Under normal circumstances, the pomp and drama of the appointment is mostly confined to London over the course of an afternoon, with the outgoing premier making a statement outside No 10 before a short car ride to Buckingham Palace.

Boris Johnson and  Liz Truss in March
Boris Johnson and Liz Truss in March (Henry Nicholls/PA)

But this time, the departing and incoming prime ministers will both have to make the 500-mile journey to the Queen’s Aberdeenshire retreat.

Mr Johnson is expected to make a farewell address outside No 10 at around 8.30am on Tuesday before departing Downing Street for the last time.

He could formally tender his resignation at around 11am, in what has been described by allies as likely to be a “very sad” occasion for Mr Johnson.

Once he has left, the new Tory leader will be invited in for her private audience with the Queen. Ms Truss will be appointed the next prime minister and asked to form an administration – possibly by around midday.

Ms Truss is then expected to fly back to London and arrive at Downing Street to address the nation for the first time as PM at around 4pm.

 Liz Truss leaving 10 Downing Street after a  Cabinet meeting in January
Liz Truss leaving 10 Downing Street after a Cabinet meeting in January (Stefan Rousseau/PA)

She will be greeted by the Cabinet Secretary at the door of No 10 and will be clapped in by staff before heading into the Cabinet Room to receive security and intelligence briefings from civil servants.

Ms Truss will be handed the nuclear codes and write “letters of last resort” to commanders of submarines carrying Trident nuclear missiles with orders on what to do if the Government has been wiped out in a nuclear attack.

She is expected to make senior Cabinet appointments.

Ms Truss will also receive calls from Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, US President Joe Biden and other world leaders wishing her well in the new job.

– Wednesday September 7

Liz Truss departs Conservative Campaign Headquarters (CCHQ) in London following the announcement that she is the new Conservative Party leader and will become the next prime minister
Liz Truss will face her first PMQs on Wednesday (Kirsty O’Connor/PA)

The new Cabinet is due to meet on Wednesday morning before Ms Truss faces Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer during her first Prime Minister’s Questions at noon.

She will continue to receive briefings and calls from international leaders as she starts working through her in-tray, which is more daunting than that of many of her recent predecessors, with challenges ranging from the cost-of-living crisis to Ukraine and industrial unrest.

4.32pm:

An artist who created a sculpture of Liz Truss which went viral on the day it was announced she would become prime minister has said he intended his work to showcase her character.

Wilfrid Wood, 53, who lives in Hackney in London and was involved with the satirical TV show Spitting Image from the 1980s and 1990s, made a plasticine sculpture of Ms Truss, which took around a day to complete.

A sculpture of Liz Truss by Wilfrid Wood
The sculpture of Liz Truss by Wilfrid Wood (Wilfrid Wood/PA)

According to Mr Wood some of the most striking features on the bust of the outgoing Foreign Secretary, who won 54.7% of the vote in Monday’s Tory leadership race, include a forehead which “stands out” and a “thick neck”.

The sculpture had Twitter users in hysterics, with more than 11,000 likes and comments likening the art to infamous horror character Chucky.

Mr Wood told the PA news agency that the “political shenanigans” surrounding the Conservative leadership led to him creating the artwork, but that he actually made Ms Truss’s competitor Rishi Sunak first.

Sculptures by Wilfrid Wood of Rishi Sunak and Liz Truss
Wilfrid Wood’s sculptures of Rishi Sunak and Liz Truss (Wilfrid Wood/PA)

“I’d already done one on Rishi Sunak. I thought it was about time I gave Liz a go,” he said.

“I tried to draw her and it didn’t feel like it would come out very successfully, so a sculpture seemed like another avenue to take.”

Describing himself as being very “neutral about politics”, Mr Wood said he intended the sculpture to showcase Ms Truss’s character.

4.24pm:

Hugh O’Leary, the husband of victorious Tory leadership candidate Liz Truss, has largely stayed out of the spotlight.

The accountant and soon-to-be new first man was born in 1974 and was reportedly brought up in Allerton, Liverpool, and went on to study at the London School of Economics.

Liz Truss with her husband Hugh O’Leary at the Queen Elizabeth II Centre in London as it was announced she is the new Conservative Party leader and will become the next prime minister
Liz Truss and her husband Hugh O’Leary at the Queen Elizabeth II Centre in London before the announcement of the Conservative Party leadership contest (Stefan Rousseau/PA)

He met his future wife at the 1997 Conservative Party conference.

Ms Truss has previously hinted at something of an awkward first date for the pair, as she told You Magazine: “I invited him ice skating and he sprained his ankle.”

Making his own venture into politics, Mr O’Leary stood as a Tory candidate in the local elections in Greenwich in 2002, but with 447 votes he fell far short of the support required to beat his Labour rivals, records show.

He has continued to play a role in the party, according to The Times, canvassing in Greenwich as recently as this year.

The newspaper cited a local former politician as saying he is “very intelligent, very interested” and “very supportive to Liz”.

Liz Truss and her husband Hugh O’Leary at the Queen Elizabeth II Centre in London ahead of the Conservative party leadership contest announcement
Liz Truss and her husband Hugh O’Leary at the Queen Elizabeth II Centre (Stefan Rousseau/PA)

However, things have not always been plain sailing for the couple.

Ms Truss’s public image hit the rocks in 2006 after it emerged she had an affair with married Conservative MP Mark Field.

Her candidacy for her Norfolk seat three years later narrowly survived an attempt by traditionalist members of her local Tory association to deselect her following the ordeal.

According to the BBC, she said at the time of the row: “It’s been public for some years now. I am really sorry about that (affair). It’s a mistake I made and as far as me and my husband are concerned it’s water under the bridge.”

Mr O’Leary has stood by his wife.

Margaret Thatcher arriving for the first time as prime minister at 10 Downing Street, London, with her husband Denis Thatcher
Margaret Thatcher arriving for the first time as prime minister at 10 Downing Street, London, with her husband Denis Thatcher (PA)

Margaret Thatcher’s husband, Denis, played a key role supporting her behind the scenes, while Theresa May described her husband Philip as her “rock”.

4.17pm:

Downing Street said it is not known if Boris Johnson has had any private conversations with Liz Truss since the Tory leadership result.

The outgoing Prime Minister’s official spokesman said: “I don’t know if he has had any private conversations with her since the result.”

Asked if the PM is planning a farewell party on Monday night, the spokesman said: “No plans for anything like that. He has spoken to a number of staff already. I don’t know if he is planning any further conversations.”

4.12pm:

Rishi Sunak’s North Yorkshire constituents said they were disappointed but not surprised at his defeat by Liz Truss and hoped he would stay on as the local MP.

Shoppers in the market town of Northallerton were digesting the news that Mr Sunak would not be the next prime minister, saying they believed he would stick to his stated plan to continue to represent them.

Matthew James, 57, said: “Obviously I would have liked him to have won but it’s no surprise and it will, hopefully, mean we will continue to see more of him up here. I think you’ll find most people really like him here and hope he stays as the local MP.”

Amanda Jenkins, 61, said: “I know there’s speculation that he’ll go abroad but I think he’ll stay on and keep helping people out. He’s done a lot in this area and I think people will remember what he did for the country with Covid and furlough and all that.”

Rishi Sunak leaves his house in London before the result of the Conservative Party leadership election was announced
Rishi Sunak leaving his house before the result of the Conservative Party leadership election was announced (Victoria Jones/PA)

Karen Scott said: “I think he would have been a really good prime minister. He’s done more for this country and this area than anybody else I can really think of. I’d rather he stay than go away and go abroad because he’s a good man.”

Ms Scott said she was unemployed and believed Mr Sunak had done a lot for people in her position.

Tony Cartwright said: “I’m not surprised. I never thought the Tories would go for Rishi for the top job. I’m not sure whether he will stay on in Parliament. I hope he does, though.”

Mr Sunak was first elected as MP for Richmond – which covers a huge swathe of rural North Yorkshire – in 2015, taking over from the former Tory leader William Hague, and in the 2019 general election he secured a huge 27,210 majority.

The former chancellor has a constituency home in a large manor house in a village just outside Northallerton.

4.04pm:

Video: Political leaders react to Liz Truss becoming next UK prime minister

3.56pm:

Shadow health secretary Wes Streeting compared incoming prime minister Liz Truss and her supporters to a “gang of arsonists” asking the country to trust them to “put out the fire” in terms of the cost-of-living crisis and other issues.

Reacting to the news of Ms Truss’s victory, Mr Streeting told the PA news agency: “No surprises that Liz Truss has won the Conservative leadership contest, I think the bigger surprise is that she’s won with a lower proportion of Conservative MPs than any incoming Conservative prime minister and a lower proportion of Conservative Party members.

Shadow health secretray Wes Streeting speaking to the media on College Green, outside the Houses of Parliament
Shadow health secretray Wes Streeting speaking to the media on College Green, outside the Houses of Parliament (James Manning/PA)

“Our concern is that after a summer of talking exclusively to Conservative Party members, she’s now about to start talking exclusively to Conservative Party MPs, rather than doing what she should be doing, which is speaking directly to the country, tackling the big issues that face us – the cost-of-living crisis, rising energy bills, the biggest crisis in the NHS’s history, and the breakdown in law and order.

“I think the challenge that Liz Truss has got is that she’s part of a gang of arsonists saying to the country, ‘trust me to put out the fire’, and I’m not sure that they will buy it.”

3.47pm:

Liz Truss is to become the third female prime minister in UK history, following in the footsteps of her political idol and the first woman to occupy No 10, Margaret Thatcher.

Theresa May became the UK’s second female prime minister in July 2016 in the wake of the Brexit vote, more than a quarter of a century after Mrs Thatcher stood down.

Her premiership ended in 2019 after she endured a torrid time dogged by the issue of Brexit.

Former prime ministers Margaret Thatcher and Theresa May, and Liz Truss, who has secured her place as the UK’s third female prime minister after beating Rishi Sunak in the election for the leadership of the Conservative Party
Margaret Thatcher, Theresa May and Liz Truss, who has secured her place as the UK’s third female prime minister after beating Rishi Sunak in the election for the leadership of the Conservative Party (PA)

Mrs May was succeeded by Boris Johnson, whose departure will see the Queen welcome Ms Truss as her 15th prime minister, and the third woman in the role.

All female premiers have so far been Conservative.

Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer defended his party’s record on equality, saying: “Over half of our MPs are women. Over half of my shadow cabinet are women. I’ve got a woman who’s my shadow chancellor and a woman who’s my shadow home secretary.”

3.40pm:

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky praised Boris Johnson as a “great friend” and thanked him for his “personal bravery”, following the announcement that Liz Truss will be the Prime Minister’s successor.

Mr Zelensky tweeted: “Had a summing up conversation with Boris Johnson (@BorisJohnson) in his current capacity.

“On behalf of all (Ukrainian) people, I thanked him for his personal bravery, principles & a major contribution to countering RF’s aggression.

“I look forward to cooperation with a great friend of (Ukraine) in a new status.”

3.38pm:

World leaders have congratulated Liz Truss on her Tory leadership victory.

Estonian Prime Minister Kaja Kallas offered her “heartfelt congratulations”, adding that she is “looking forward” to meeting the new Conservative leader again soon after meeting with her as Foreign Secretary.

Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida sent his “best wishes” to Ms Truss and added he has “high expectations” for how she will lead the United Kingdom.

Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese also congratulated Ms Truss, tweeting: “I look forward to a continued constructive relationship and friendship between our nations and people.”

Netherlands Prime Minister Mark Rutte said he hopes to further strengthen ties with the UK under Ms Truss’s leadership.

“The Netherlands has long enjoyed close ties with the UK, and I look forward to working with Ms Truss to strengthen them even further,” Mr Rutte tweeted.

“I wish (Ms Truss) every success in her new job.”

3.30pm:

Left to right, Rishi Sunak, Liz Truss, and her husband Hugh O’Leary, at the Queen Elizabeth II Centre in London ahead of the announcement that Ms Truss is the new Conservative Party leader and will become the next prime minister
Rishi Sunak, Liz Truss and her husband Hugh O’Leary at the Queen Elizabeth II Centre in London ahead of the announcement that Ms Truss is the new Conservative Party leader and will become the next prime minister (Stefan Rousseau/PA)

3.25pm:

People in Liz Truss’s South West Norfolk constituency gave a mixed reaction to news that she will become the country’s next prime minister.

Retired probation officer Jackie Westrop, of Downham Market, said Ms Truss has “a hell of a lot of work to do” in her new role.

“I extend my congratulations,” said the 66-year-old, speaking outside a supermarket in the town.

“This is something that she’s driven for for quite some time. I only hope her constituency doesn’t suffer.

Retired probation officer Jackie Westrop, 66, of Downham Market in Liz Truss’s constituency of South West Norfolk
Retired probation officer Jackie Westrop, 66, of Downham Market in Liz Truss’s constituency of South West Norfolk (Sam Russell/PA)

“This constituency, like a lot of other places in the country, has some significant problems, and I hope she and her team don’t forget the people who originally elected her as an MP years ago.”

Ms Truss entered Parliament in 2010 with a comfortable majority of more than 13,000.

Artist Rob Shaw, who lives in the village of Stoke Ferry, said that, between Ms Truss and her leadership rival Rishi Sunak, he does not “think it really matters in this situation who took over”.

Civil servant Rebecca Thomson, 42 of Downham Market, said she hopes Ms Truss will address “what we’re all going to be facing in regard to our finances”.

Semi-retired handyman Michael Beaton, of the village of Southery, said: “The Tories, so far, have devastated most of the NHS and things like that, haven’t they? Whether she does anything about that and puts it back instead of trying to privatise it all, they’ve got to make up their minds which way they want to go.”

3.13pm:

Ben Elliot, an ally of Boris Johnson, has resigned as Conservative Party co-chairman following Liz Truss’s election as leader.

Conservative Party chief executive Darren Mott said: “The whole Conservative Party wants to thank Ben Elliot for his tireless service over the past three years.

“Without his incredible efforts, the 2019 landslide would not have been possible. We wish him all the best in his future endeavours.”

3.09pm:

A mural by artist Ciaran Gallagher depicting Liz Truss being declared a winner by Jacob Rees Mogg after beating Rishi Sunak, who is counted out by Boris Johnson, in a boxing match, which has been unveiled in Belfast after Ms Truss won the Conservative Party leadership election
A mural in Belfast by artist Ciaran Gallagher depicting Liz Truss being declared a winner in a boxing match by Jacob Rees-Mogg after beating Rishi Sunak, who is counted out by Boris Johnson (Peter Morrison/PA)

3.07pm:

Business groups called for “decisive action” from the next prime minister to avoid company failures as they tackle rocketing energy bills.

Stephen Phipson, chief executive of manufacturers’ body Make UK, congratulated Liz Truss on her appointment but added “industry at this time needs decisive action from the new government to help it through a prolonged period of unprecedented hikes in energy bills, rising cost of raw materials and critical labour shortages in order to keep Britain’s place as a leader of innovation on the world stage”.

Kate Nicholls, chief executive of UKHospitality, said the trade group is keen to work closely with Ms Truss and her Cabinet “as we strive to save the hospitality industry”.

The British Retail Consortium called for the new prime minister to take action on business rates, the property tax facing high street businesses.

2.57pm:

Wales’s First Minister urged the UK’s next prime minister to work with him to “save millions from hardship this winter”.

Mark Drakeford congratulated Liz Truss, winner of the Tory leadership contest, but said she must act now to tackle the cost-of-living crisis, tweeting: “There is no more time to waste – action is needed now.”

2.52pm:

Liz Truss said she would deliver on a plan to boost the economy and deal with the cost-of-living crisis after winning the Tory leadership.

2.46pm:

When asked whether he was hopeful to keep a job in Cabinet, James Cleverly said he will support Liz Truss in “whatever way I’m able to”, and he believes the public will “warm” to her over time.

The Education Secretary told the PA news agency: “I’m not going to guess or speculate or try to predict who might form part of the government.

“I’m going to support her in whatever way I’m able to because I think she’s going to be a fantastic prime minister.”

Secretary of State for Education James Cleverly speaking to the media on College Green, outside the Houses of Parliament, Westminster
Secretary of State for Education James Cleverly speaking to the media on College Green, outside the Houses of Parliament, Westminster (James Manning/PA)

When asked whether he was concerned about Ms Truss being less popular with the public than her predecessor, he said: “Boris was a very, very popular prime minister and he’s still very, very popular with huge swathes of the country and people know him very well.

“But I have absolutely no doubt that the more they see of Liz, the more they get to know her, the more they will warm to her, which is exactly what we saw during this leadership competition.

“She’s got a tough job to do but I know she’ll hit the ground running and use the campaign experience that she has got to deliver good government for the country.”

2.42pm:

Conservative leadership bid
Artist Ciaran Gallagher beside his new mural in Belfast after Liz Truss won the Conservative Party leadership election (Peter Morrison/PA)

2.37pm:

Work and Pensions Secretary Therese Coffey said Liz Truss will confirm positions in her Cabinet on Tuesday.

Speaking to the PA news agency about Ms Truss’s victory as she left the Conservatives Campaign Headquarters in Westminster, central London, supporter Ms Coffey said: “It’s amazing.

“I’m really excited and looking forward to taking office tomorrow and get on delivering (our) manifesto and getting growth and I’m really thrilled.”

Asked if she’s expecting to keep her post in the Cabinet, Ms Coffey said: “That is up to the leader of the party, and soon-to-be prime minister.

“All the posts will be confirmed tomorrow.”

She added: “I will be open with you. We’ve got great candidates who put themselves forward to be leader of the party.

“I’m just thrilled that Liz won and will get on with the job.”

Conservative leadership bid
Liz Truss departs Conservative Campaign Headquarters in London (Victoria Jones/PA)

2.32pm:

Michael Fabricant, Tory MP for Lichfield, said Liz Truss’s election by the party membership was “very good news for the UK and the Midlands”.

He said: “I personally backed Liz so I am really pleased with the result, although I was disappointed Boris was forced to leave in the first place in what was a very British coup.”

He added: “With a new prime minister comes a new Government and Liz is very aware that she will have to deliver on all her promises.

“In particular, and at the top of her red box (of briefing papers), will be solving the cost-of-living crisis caused by the astronomic rise in heating bills.

“I am expecting announcements regarding this by the end of the week.

“She needs to hit the ground running.”

2.24pm

The Conservative West Midlands mayor Andy Street, who had backed Ms Truss for the premiership, congratulated the victorious leadership candidate, adding it was time to “get to work” for “families and businesses”.

He said: “Now let’s get to work on tackling the cost-of-living emergency for families and businesses, and press ahead with levelling up the West Midlands.”

2.15pm:

DUP leader Sir Jeffrey Donaldson said he wanted to see Liz Truss deal with the Northern Ireland Protocol as a priority.

Sir Jeffrey said he had already written to the incoming prime minister setting out what his party believed her priorities should be.

He said: “Chief among those is taking forward the Bill which will provide a basis for a solution to deal with the protocol, to remove the barriers to trade between Northern Ireland and Great Britain, to fully restore Northern Ireland’s place within the UK internal market.”

2.12pm:

European Commission vice-president Maros Sefcovic, who has been leading the Brussels side in talks on implementing the Brexit arrangements, said a “positive relationship” between the UK and EU “is of great strategic importance”.

“I stand ready to work intensively and constructively with my new UK interlocutor to foster such a partnership, in full respect of our agreements,” he said.

2.08pm:

Liz Truss told Tory members in her victory speech that she will deliver “a great victory for the Conservative Party in 2024″, suggesting she intends to call a general election in two years’ time.

This would be sooner than is required by law, which gives the last possible date for the next election as January 23 2025.

A contest in the winter of 2024/25 would probably not appeal to most politicians, given it would mean campaigning during the Christmas period, and so an election at a slightly earlier date has always seemed the more likely outcome.

One option would be to hold the contest on the same day as the local elections on May 2 2024, which would mean Ms Truss had only 20 months between taking office as prime minister and facing the voters.

Another option could be an election in early autumn 2024, shortly after Ms Truss has notched up two years in the job but before the clocks go back at the end of October.

2.06pm:

Liz Truss arriving at the Conservative Campaign Headquarters in London after her victory in the leadership contest
Liz Truss arriving at the Conservative Campaign Headquarters in London after her victory in the leadership contest (Kirsty O’Connor/PA)

2.01pm:

Union leaders were scathing about how long it has taken to elect a new prime minister and made clear that Liz Truss’s top priority must be tackling the cost-of-living crisis.

Unison general secretary Christina McAnea said: “Leaving the country rudderless all summer at a time of great emergency has been nothing short of a national disgrace.

“The Government has got to get back to governing immediately. Liz Truss must do what should’ve happened months ago and deliver help to the millions unable to cope with their crushing bills.”

Transport Salaried Staffs’ Association general secretary Manuel Cortes said the new Conservative Party leader had “offered nothing” to deal with the economic crisis during a leadership contest which had been “a charade about which candidate is the best Thatcherite”.

2pm:

Liz Truss has arrived at the Conservative Campaign Headquarters in Westminster after she won the Tory leadership contest.

She arrived in a car with Work and Pensions Secretary Therese Coffey.

Liz Truss and Conservative Party chairman Andy Stephenson at  Conservative Campaign Headquarters (CCHQ) in London, following the announcement that she is the new Conservative Party leader and will become the next prime minister
Liz Truss and Conservative Party co-chairman Andrew Stephenson at Conservative Campaign Headquarters (CCHQ) in London (Kirsty O’Connor/PA)

She was met by crowds of reporters and stood at the top of the steps posing for a photo with Conservative Party co-chairman Andrew Stephenson.

Anti-Brexit campaigner Steve Bray and his supporters shouted at Ms Truss from outside the gate while playing loud music.

1.51pm:

European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen said she wanted a “constructive relationship” with Liz Truss “in full respect of our agreements”.

The new Tory leader has said she intends to press ahead with the Northern Ireland Protocol Bill, which will allow the Government to override parts of the agreement struck with the European Union on post-Brexit arrangements.

“The EU and the UK are partners,” Ms von der Leyen said.

“We face many challenges together, from climate change to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. I look forward to a constructive relationship, in full respect of our agreements.”

1.47pm:

Liz Truss has had one of the quickest journeys in modern political history from starting as an MP to becoming prime minister.

She first entered Parliament at the 2010 general election, when she won the seat of South West Norfolk with 48% of the vote, and she held the seat at the 2015, 2017 and 2019 elections, increasing her share of the vote on each occasion.

It has taken Ms Truss just 12 years to go from being a new MP to becoming the new prime minister.

Only three other politicians in modern times have made the same journey in a shorter period, all of them Conservatives: Boris Johnson and John Major, both of whom took 11 years, and David Cameron, who needed just nine years.

Years spent as MP before becoming prime minister
(PA Graphics)

Tony Blair took 14 years from becoming an MP in 1983 to entering Downing Street in 1997.

Other prime ministers have typically needed around two decades or more to climb to the top, including Theresa May and Harold Wilson, who both took 19 years, and Edward Heath and Margaret Thatcher, who took 20.

Gordon Brown had to wait much longer than many of his contemporaries, with a total of 24 years between his debut as an MP in 1983 and the start of his premiership in 2007.

But even this was not quite as long a wait as that experienced by Jim Callaghan, who took 31 years from starting as an MP in 1945 to becoming Labour prime minister in 1976.

1.40pm:

A van from the company Harrow Green moving professionals at the rear entrance to Downing Street, London, after it was announced Liz Truss is the new Conservative Party leader and will become the next prime minister
A van from the company Harrow Green moving professionals at the rear entrance to Downing Street, London, after it was announced Liz Truss is the new Conservative Party leader and will become the next prime minister (Yui Mok/PA)

1.38pm:

Sinn Fein vice president Michelle O’Neill said Liz Truss needs to prioritise the restoration of powersharing in Northern Ireland.

Ms O’Neill said the UK Government needed to stop “pandering to the DUP” as she called for an urgent meeting with the incoming prime minister.

“Liz Truss has an opportunity to come in now and stop pandering to the DUP, stop pandering to the approach which is damaging to our ability to help people through the cost-of-living crisis,” she said.

She urged the new prime minister not to suspend the Northern Ireland Protocol, by triggering Article 16 of the post-Brexit arrangements, and instead to engage with the EU and the Irish government to find a resolution to the issues with Irish Sea trade.

“What we need to see now is a change of tack, a change of policy, a change of approach,” she said.

1.32pm:

In his tweet congratulating Liz Truss, defeated Tory leadership contender Rishi Sunak said: “Thank you to everyone who voted for me in this campaign.

“I’ve said throughout that the Conservatives are one family.

“It’s right we now unite behind the new PM, Liz Truss, as she steers the country through difficult times.”

1.30pm:

Liz Truss won a smaller share of the Tory membership vote than any of her predecessors as Conservative Party leader.

Ms Truss picked up 57% of the valid votes cast, compared with 43% for Rishi Sunak.

In 2019, Boris Johnson won 66% of votes in the membership ballot, with Jeremy Hunt winning 34%.

Conservative leadership election: how result of membership ballot compares
(PA Graphics)

David Cameron managed an even bigger share in 2005, winning 68% of votes to David Davis’s 32%.

Ms Truss also fell short of the total secured by Iain Duncan Smith in 2001, who picked up 61% of votes versus Ken Clarke’s 39%.

In the two other leadership contests that have occurred under the current rules, in 2003 and 2016, the outcome was decided before a ballot of the membership could take place.

1.24pm:

Defeated Tory leadership contender Rishi Sunak said: “It’s right we now unite behind the new PM, Liz Truss, as she steers the country through difficult times.”

1.23pm:

Liz Truss speaks at the Queen Elizabeth II Centre, London, after being announced as the new Conservative Party leader and next prime minister
Liz Truss speaks at the Queen Elizabeth II Centre, London, after being announced as the new Conservative Party leader and next prime minister (Stefan Rousseau/PA)

1.22pm:

Justice Secretary and Deputy Prime Minister Dominic Raab, who was a key supporter of Rishi Sunak during the Tory leadership contest, congratulated Liz Truss and called for the Conservative Party to “come together”.

“Congratulations (Liz Truss) on being elected leader of the Conservatives, and to (Rishi Sunak) for a well-fought campaign,” he tweeted.

“Now, we must all come together to support the new Prime Minister in delivering for the British people.”

1.16pm:

Outgoing Prime Minister Boris Johnson said his successor Liz Truss “has the right plan to tackle the cost-of-living crisis, unite our party and continue the great work of uniting and levelling up our country” after she won the Tory leadership race.

1.15pm:

Brexit minister Jacob Rees-Mogg said he is “delighted” that Liz Truss has been chosen to become the next prime minister.

Emerging from the Queen Elizabeth II Centre in Westminster where the result of the Tory leadership contest was announced, Mr Rees-Mogg said: “Delighted Liz Truss has won. It’s very good news for the Conservative Party and for the country.”

He added: “I think she will be an excellent prime minister.”

Jacob Rees-Mogg at the rear of Downing Street after it was announced Liz Truss is the new Conservative Party leader and will become the next prime minister
Jacob Rees-Mogg at the rear of Downing Street after it was announced Liz Truss is the new Conservative Party leader and will become the next prime minister (Yui Mok/PA)

1.12pm:

The Archbishop of Canterbury said he is praying for Liz Truss as she becomes prime minister “at a time of such significant challenges”.

“I am praying for Liz Truss as she takes on the great responsibilities of leadership at a time of such significant challenges,” Justin Welby tweeted.

“May God guide her, and all who serve in our political life, towards His hope for our nation, and particular care for those who are vulnerable.”

1.10pm:

Sir Keir Starmer said Liz Truss is “not on the side of working people” after she was unveiled as the new leader of the Conservative party.

Giving his reaction to the result of the leadership election at Friern Barnet School in north London, he told journalists: “We’ve heard far more from the latest prime minister about cuts to corporation tax over the summer than we have about the cost-of-living crisis, the single most important thing that’s bearing down on so many millions of households.

“That shows not only that she’s out of touch, but she’s not on the side of working people. So she needs to deal with the cost-of-living crisis, she needs to deal with the fact the NHS is on its knees, and she needs to deal with the collapse of law and order.”

1.07pm:

The pound rallied slightly after Liz Truss was announced as the winner of the Conservative Party’s leadership election.

Sterling was trading at 1.1508 against the dollar, down a little over 0.7% on the day.

It had been trading slightly lower ahead of the announcement, but had already regained most of its ground after falling to a 37-year low earlier on Monday.

Against the euro the pound was up 0.3% to 1.1600.

1.05pm:

Former Conservative prime minister David Cameron tweeted: “Many congratulations to new PM (Liz Truss).

“At this time of challenge & global uncertainty, I wish the new government well.

“I never forget the support I had from all former Conservative leaders when I won the ballot in 2005 & I hope all Conservatives will unite behind the new PM.”

1.03pm:

Left to right, Oliver Dowden, Rishi Sunak, Liz Truss, and her husband Hugh O’Leary, at the Queen Elizabeth II Centre in London as it was announced that Ms Truss is the new Conservative Party leader and will become the next prime minister
Left to right, Oliver Dowden, Rishi Sunak, Liz Truss, and her husband Hugh O’Leary, at the Queen Elizabeth II Centre in London as it was announced that Ms Truss is the new Conservative Party leader and will become the next prime minister (Stefan Rousseau/PA)

12.58pm:

Scotland’s First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said she “will seek to build a good working relationship” with Liz Truss after her election as Conservative leader.

She tweeted: “Congratulations to Liz Truss. Our political differences are deep, but I will seek to build a good working relationship with her as I did with last 3 PMs.

“She must now freeze energy bills for people & businesses, deliver more cash support, and increase funding for public services.”

12.57pm:

Congratulating Liz Truss, former prime minister and Conservative leader Theresa May said her party must now “work together”, adding that she looked forward to supporting Ms Truss’s government in tackling the cost-of-living crisis.

“Congratulations (Liz Truss),” she tweeted.

“We Conservatives must now work together to address the challenges facing our country.

“Tackling the cost of living, delivering for those in need & managing the public finances responsibly. I look forward to supporting the Government in that task.”

12.55pm:

In her victory speech, Liz Truss said: “Thank you for putting your faith in me to lead our great Conservative Party, the greatest political party on earth.

“I know that our beliefs resonate with the British people: our beliefs in freedom, in the ability to control your own life, in low taxes, in personal responsibility.

“I know that’s why people voted for us in such numbers in 2019 and as your party leader I intend to deliver what we promised those voters right across our great country.”

12.53pm:

Liberal Democrat leader Sir Ed Davey called for a general election in the wake of Liz Truss’s victory in the Conservative leadership contest.

“Under Liz Truss, we’re set to see more of the same crisis and chaos as under Boris Johnson. From the cost of living emergency to the NHS crisis, the Conservatives have shown they don’t care, and have no plan,” Sir Ed tweeted.

“It’s time to scrap the energy price hike then call a general election.”

12.50pm:

Ms Truss received a standing ovation after her victory speech in central London.

12.48pm:

Incoming prime minister Liz Truss promised a “bold plan” to cut taxes and grow the economy and “deliver on the energy crisis, dealing with people’s energy bills but also dealing with the long-term issues we have on energy supply”.

12.47pm:

Video: Liz Truss: New Conservative Party leader in profile

12.46pm:

Liz Truss praised “my friend” Boris Johnson as she accepted her victory in the Tory leadership contest.

She said: “I also want to thank our outgoing leader, my friend, Boris Johnson.”

Ms Truss continued: “Boris, you got Brexit done, you crushed Jeremy Corbyn, you rolled out the vaccine and you stood up to Vladimir Putin. You were admired from Kyiv to Carlisle.”

There was a delay before applause from the audience.

12.44pm:

Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer tweeted: “I’d like to congratulate our next prime minister Liz Truss as she prepares for office.

“But after 12 years of the Tories all we have to show for it is low wages, high prices, and a Tory cost-of-living crisis.

“Only Labour can deliver the fresh start our country needs.”

12.42pm:

Liz Truss said it was an honour to be announced as the winner of the Tory leadership contest after a “hard-fought campaign” against Rishi Sunak.

12.41pm:

Ms Truss won with 81,326 votes from the Tory membership, to Rishi Sunak’s 60,399.

12.38pm:

BREAKING: Liz Truss has won the Tory leadership contest and will become the country’s next prime minister.

12.29pm:

The formal announcement of the result will be made shortly by Sir Graham Brady, chairman of the 1922 Committee of Conservative backbench MPs.

Sir Graham Brady arrives at the Queen Elizabeth II Centre in London for the announcement of the new Conservative Party leader
Sir Graham Brady arrives at the Queen Elizabeth II Centre (Victoria Jones/PA)

12.23pm:

James Cleverly suggested he would accept the foreign secretary job in a Cabinet run by Liz Truss if it was offered to him.

Speaking to the PA news agency at the site of the announcement in central London, he said: “Rishi’s (Sunak) a smart guy, really good campaigner. It would be ridiculous ever to take a result for granted.

James Cleverly arrives at the Queen Elizabeth II Centre in London for the announcement of the new Conservative party leader
James Cleverly arrives at the Queen Elizabeth II Centre in London for the announcement of the new Conservative Party leader (Kirsty O’Connor/PA)

“But I think Liz has put in a fantastic campaign, and I think she’s done enough to win.”

Put to him that he is tipped for foreign secretary if Ms Truss is successful, he said: “Let’s get one thing (done) at a time.”

Asked if he would accept the job if offered it, he said: “Who wouldn’t accept it?”

12.15pm:

Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer has said he will not miss outgoing Prime Minister Boris Johnson when he leaves office on Tuesday.

Asked if he would miss Mr Johnson, he told journalists at Friern Barnet School in north London: “No, I think it’s good that Boris Johnson has gone. It’s good for the country and he should stay gone.”

Prime Minister Boris Johnson, his wife Carrie Johnson and Labour Party leader Sir Keir Starmer during the Platinum Jubilee Pageant in front of Buckingham Palace, London, in June
Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Labour Party leader Sir Keir Starmer during the Platinum Jubilee Pageant in front of Buckingham Palace in June (Hannah McKay/PA)

12.10pm:

A man was detained by police outside the Queen Elizabeth II Centre in Westminster, central London, where the announcement is due to take place.

The man, who is a protester with the campaign group Animal Rebellion, was handcuffed, carried off the road and frisked by officers.

Four others were sitting in the road opposite Westminster Abbey, holding a sign reading: “Planet-based future” and chanting: “Protect our planet, respect our future” while officers tried to speak to them.

A fifth protester, Joel Scott-Halkes, 30, from Cornwall, told the PA news agency: “We are going to continue disrupting the dairy industry for as long as it takes until there are supermarket shortages.

“We are going to do this until the Government and the new prime minister meet our demands,” he added, saying these include ensuring the transition to plant-based farming and rewilding the land that this frees up.

12.05pm:

Protesters outside the Methodist Central Hall in Westminster, London, ahead of the announcement of the new Conservative party leader and next prime minister
Protesters outside the Methodist Central Hall in Westminster, London, ahead of the announcement of the new Tory party leader and next prime minister (Victoria Jones/PA)

12pm:

In a message to the incoming prime minister, the European Commission said they would be expected to honour the Northern Ireland Protocol in full.

Commission spokesman Eric Mamer wished Liz Truss and Rishi Sunak good luck ahead of the announcement of the Tory leadership contest winner but said Brussels’ position on the protocol had not changed “one iota”.

Speaking in Brussels, he said: “We are always looking for new beginnings. Obviously anything that can help move forward in our relationship with the United Kingdom will be very welcome.

“As to what we expect it is very clear, it has not changed one iota: We expect the full implementation of the Withdrawal Agreement, the Trade and Co-operation Agreement we have signed and, of course, the Irish and Northern Irish Protocol.”

11.57am:

Penny Mordaunt, a former candidate in the Tory leadership contest, was among those arriving at the Queen Elizabeth II Centre in London for the announcement of the party’s new leader.

Penny Mordaunt arrives at the Queen Elizabeth II Centre in London for the announcement of the new Conservative party leader
(Kirsty O’Connor/PA)

11.52am:

The appointment of the new leader comes at a difficult time amid the cost-of-living crisis.

Liz Truss is reportedly strongly considering freezing energy bills in a bid to ease the burden on households this winter if she wins the Conservative leadership contest.

Having made tax cuts a key priority during her leadership campaign, Ms Truss had remained tight-lipped about what kind of support package she might introduce as the UK faces the prospect of soaring energy bills and a worsening cost-of-living crisis.

But reports in The Daily Telegraph and The Times on Monday suggest she is likely to introduce an energy bills freeze in some form.

11.45am:

Former chancellor Rishi Sunak left his home in London earlier this morning ahead of the announcement.

Rishi Sunak leaves his house in London on the day that the result of the Conservative Party leadership election is set to be announced
(Victoria Jones/PA)