Lizzo hits out at cancel culture: ‘Trendy, misused and misdirected’

Lizzo said she thought cancel culture was overshadowing more serious issues and “real outrage” (PA Archive)
Lizzo said she thought cancel culture was overshadowing more serious issues and “real outrage” (PA Archive)

Lizzo has taken to social media to share her opinions on cancel culture, saying that the action is being “misused and misdirected”.

Taking to Twitter on Sunday (January 8), the singer explained that she believes the practice of cancelling others has “become trendy, misused and misdirected”, overshadowing more serious issues and “real outrage" in the process.

She wrote: “This may be a random time to say this but it’s on my heart.

“Cancel culture is appropriation. There was real outrage from truly marginalised people and now it’s become trendy, misused and misdirected.

“I hope we can phase out of this and focus our outrage on the real problems.”

Cancel culture is the practice of withdrawing support for public figures and companies after they have done or said something considered objectionable, insensitive or offensive.

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In the case of celebrities, the form of social or professional ostracisation has come in the form of boycotts by the public or employers against them.

Last June, the Grammy winning singer received backlash over the use of an ableist slur within her track, Grrrls.

The pop superstar said she “never want(s) to promote derogatory language” and said she was “dedicated to being part of the change I’ve been waiting to see in the world”.

At the time, disability charity Scope urged her not to leave disabled people out of her message of “self-acceptance” and to change the lyrics used in the opening verse.

Writing on social media, she acknowledged her role “as an influential artist” and said the decision was a result of her “listening and taking action”.

“It’s been brought to my attention that there is a harmful word in my new song Grrrls. Let me make one thing clear: I never want to promote derogatory language.

The singer came under fire last June over lyric in her song Grrrls (Getty Images for The Recording A)
The singer came under fire last June over lyric in her song Grrrls (Getty Images for The Recording A)

“As a fat black woman in America, I’ve had many hurtful words used against me so I overstand the power words can have (whether intentionally or in my case, unintentionally).

“I’m proud to say there’s a new version of Grrrls with a lyric change. This is the result of me listening and taking action.

“As an influential artist I’m dedicated to being part of the change I’ve been waiting to see in the world. Xoxo, Lizzo.”

During an interview in October, she reflected on the controversy, saying that she had “never heard [the term] used as a slur against disabled people” when the song was released.

She shared: “It’s a word I’ve heard a lot, especially in rap songs, and with my Black friends and in my Black circles: It means to go off, turn up.

“I used [it as a] verb, not as a noun or adjective. I used it in the way that it’s used in the Black community.”

Lizzo isn’t the only celebrity sharing her thoughts on cancel culture with both Kevin Hart and Dakota Johnson both weighing in on the topic of late.