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I’m a career expert — land your dream job in 2024 by following these 4 clear steps

If you’ve been manifesting a better 2024, there are four things you can do to level up — professionally, at least.

LinkedIn career expert Charlotte Davies dished her tricks for getting ahead in your career, from networking to public speaking.

“As we’re settling into the new year, people are looking to take back ownership of their careers,” she told the Daily Mail.

“However, not all career change means looking for a new job. Whilst a new role is the answer for some, others prefer to stay in a role and progress.”

After having a “career-planning conversation with your boss” to express your interest in more opportunity and develop a roadmap to success, Davies recommends four crucial steps to further your career.

“As we’re settling into the new year, people are looking to take back ownership of their careers,” Davies told the Daily Mail. Getty Images/iStockphoto
“As we’re settling into the new year, people are looking to take back ownership of their careers,” Davies told the Daily Mail. Getty Images/iStockphoto

Practice public speaking

According to Davies, speaking in public in front of large groups is one of the most difficult undertakings, as it’s one of the most intimidating parts of being a professional.

“In particular, employees list interviews as the hardest part of the job search, and being able to confidently present yourself will help set you up for success,” she said.

Public speaking, however, is an integral part of being a leader, and it can be mastered with preparation and practice (after all, it makes perfect).

“Volunteer for as many opportunities as possible and invest time in going over your notes, videotape yourself or ask a friend or colleague to critique your performance,” she advised.

Davies’ offered a series of tips for career success. LinkedIn
Davies’ offered a series of tips for career success. LinkedIn

Avoid career complacency

Don’t be passive in your own career, Davies warned.

“Plan ahead, think about your long-term goals, why you want to achieve them and how you’re going to get there,” she said, adding that it’s vital to write them down, along with any opportunities for improvement.

She added: “Without a longer term view, you may find yourself so focused on daily tasks that you lose sight of what it is you’re working towards.”

She recommended taking on new projects and responsibilities at work, which could “showcase leadership or management skills.”

“You can control the direction of your career by capitalizing on learning opportunities and challenging yourself,” she said.

Honing your skillset, networking, taking on more responsibility and setting goals with your boss are all ways to advance in the workplace. fizkes – stock.adobe.com
Honing your skillset, networking, taking on more responsibility and setting goals with your boss are all ways to advance in the workplace. fizkes – stock.adobe.com

Schmooze your way to what you want

Mixers, events, happy hours — oh my. Davies’ advice is to attend anything and everything and be sure to engage with your network’s posts online.

Better yet, if you’re interested in a specific job, reach out to someone in your network at the company who may be able to introduce you.

“Every connection you make has the potential to impact your professional life positively, whether that’s a job recommendation, an introduction or career advice so it’s important to build and foster your professional relationships,” Davies said.

Keep learning new skills

According to Davies, employers are more interested in a versatile skillset than a college degree. Her advice is to invest in and hone your skills while learning new ones, such as utilizing artificial intelligence.

However, the one thing to avoid at all costs is “hustle culture,” she noted.

While employees emphasize the importance of work-life balance, people find it hard to achieve, she said.

“This is, in part, down to ‘hustle culture,'” she dished. “Often, it glorifies long hours and relentless dedication to work, with little regard for your personal life.”

She added: “Even if you’re a career oriented person, it’s worth knowing when to prioritize work, and when to step back and relax for a bit.”