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'He made everyone in a room smile' - tutors remember teenager killed in York

George Sawyer was a student at Askham Bryan College <i>(Image: Newsquest)</i>
George Sawyer was a student at Askham Bryan College (Image: Newsquest)

"HE had the ability to make everyone in a room smile" - those were the words of tutors describing a teenager killed in a crash on the A64 in York.

As The Press reported on Tuesday (March 28) George Sawyer, 18, from Farnley Tyas near Huddersfield in West Yorkshire was killed as he tried to cross the road in the early hours of Monday (March 27).

George studied arable agriculture at nearby Askham Bryan College and played rugby at Huddersfield Rugby Union Football Club from a young age.

Friends have been leaving floral tributes at the crash site.

And tutors at his college have today paid their tributes.


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Tim Whitaker, Principal and Chief Executive Officer, Askham Bryan College, said: “On behalf of the college, I want to express our deepest sympathies and heartfelt condolences to George’s family and friends at this terribly sad time.

“We have opened a book of condolence for students and staff, and our flag is flying at half-mast in George’s honour and will be a focal point for staff and students to pay their respects. George will be greatly missed by students and staff, who are trying to come to terms with this shocking and sudden loss. We are supporting them at this very difficult time.”

Staff from the Agriculture Department said: “George was studying Level 3 Agriculture, on the arable pathway in his second year with us, and he had a very promising future. He was an outstanding, dedicated, knowledgeable and skilled student with a great passion for the course and agriculture in general.

“George will also be remembered for his brilliant sense of humour, the ability to make everyone in a room smile and to always lift the mood and get everyone working. He was a pleasure to teach, perfectly balancing a cheeky character and great sense of humour with a willingness to work and succeed that made him so popular among staff and fellow students alike.”