Advertisement

Mayor Adams heading to Texas this weekend as economic toll of migrant surge weighs on NYC

Mayor Eric Adams
Mayor Eric Adams

Mayor Eric Adams is heading to the southern border this weekend — just two days after dozens of migrants rushed a border wall in El Paso, Texas.

The jaunt south, his second such trip to the Lone Star State since the start of the migrant crisis, marks City Hall’s latest attempt to draw national attention to the financial burden the migrant influx has put on the Big Apple and pressure the Biden administration to step up.

“We’ve spent over $4 billion thus far, the federal government has only allocated a little over $100 million… that is no way nowhere near what they should be providing,” Hizzoner railed on Reset Talk Show Friday morning, before dropping news of his weekend plans.

Mayor Eric Adams is set to head to Texas this weekend. Robert Miller
Mayor Eric Adams is set to head to Texas this weekend. Robert Miller
Adams last headed south in October to Central and South America. Jose Jacome/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock
Adams last headed south in October to Central and South America. Jose Jacome/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

A City Hall rep told The Post Friday that the mayor was invited by Sister Norma Pimentel, who serves as executive director of the Catholic Charities of the Rio Grande Valley in San Juan but did not immediately have any other details about the trip.

Calls to the group were not immediately returned.

“Finding solutions to national issues requires national collaboration, and I am eager to meet with Sister Norma Pimentel, her team, and other leaders to discuss our work in New York City and explore new ways to collaborate with leaders in cities across the country,” Adams said in a statement.

Last October, Adams headed to Central and South America to speak with local and national leaders about the crisis.

Since spring 2022, the Big Apple has seen nearly 185,000 asylum seekers arrive at its door, costing taxpayers billions to house, clothe and feed them.

More than 64,500 migrants remain in the city’s care.

For its part, the federal government has only provided around $150 million to help offset the cost, which is expected to come in at just over $10 billion through the next fiscal year.

Those funds took months for the Adams administration to make available. It wasn’t until FEMA staffers came to the Big Apple to help the admin with the paperwork that the more than $106 million in aid was accessible for reimbursement.