The bowl for those with an APP-etite: Japanese noodle bowl has built-in iPhone dock

Yahoo! News UK

Musical mealtimes: The MisoSoupDesign is the latest in noodle bowl/iPhone technology (Caters)

Japanese foodies with a big APP-etite can now enjoy mealtimes even more - by using this noodle bowl with an inbuilt iPhone dock.

The MisoSoupDesign 'Anti Loneliness Ramen Bowl' is a soup dish-cum-docking station for those who are glued to their smartphone even while eating.

The bowl is made with a specially shaped hole for a mobile device, allowing you to read or watch emails as you eat alone.

Designed by Daisuke Nagatomo and Jan Minnie, it's pitched at people who regularly eat on their own and need entertaining. It also doubles as an amplifying speaker.

Daisuke Nagatomo said: "Using smart phones have become a social phenomenon, especially when people never want to put it down, even while eating.

"The inspiration came from the image of a lonely guy eating noodles at a restaurant, with chopsticks in one hand, and a phone in the other.

"For some people, that is absolutely the most normal thing to do - stay connected to the world.

"A phone gives a purpose to the user, and brings the lonely guy to an undisturbed, secured bubble.

"MisoSoupDesign sees the problem of needing a third hand while eating. The design is to restore the proper table manner while eating ramen.

"Now, you have both hands free to use chopsticks and a spoon."

















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