Mourner leaves ‘one last story’ amongst tributes to the late Queen in Scotland

·2-min read
Scots are continuing to pay tribute to the Queen following her death on Thursday (Owen Humphreys/PA)
Scots are continuing to pay tribute to the Queen following her death on Thursday (Owen Humphreys/PA)

Scots mourning the late Elizabeth II have continued to pay tribute to her, two days after her death.

People are still leaving flowers and other tributes at both Balmoral Castle in Aberdeenshire, and at the Palace of Holyroodhouse in Edinburgh – where one visitor left a copy of Michael Bond’s book Paddington At The Rainbow’s End.

A note written on it said simply: “One last story Ma’am. X”

A film issued as part of the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee celebrations earlier this year had featured the late monarch taking tea with the famous bear.

Bouquets of flowers have been laid outside Balmoral Castle, where he Queen died. (Tom Wilkinson/PA)
Bouquets of flowers have been laid outside Balmoral Castle, where he Queen died. (Tom Wilkinson/PA)

With many heading for Balmoral in Aberdeenshire, where the Queen died on Thursday, the authorities there urged people not to drive to the castle.

Aberdeenshire Council issued a reminder that there is “no vehicle access to Balmoral for leaving floral tributes”, saying people should instead use park and ride services from the nearby villages of Ballater and Braemar.

“Please note services are expected to be very busy, so please allow plenty of time for your journey,” the statement added.

(PA Graphics) (PA Graphics)
(PA Graphics) (PA Graphics)

Meanwhile in Edinburgh, outside the  Palace of Holyroodhouse, a table was set up where two security guards were cutting the plastic off bunches of flowers so that people can lay them on the ground.

Stewards and police officers told the PA news agency the plastic is being removed for environmental reasons and to make it easier to replant the flowers later on.

As people across the UK remembered the Queen, her son was officially declared King at a service in London.

Charles III was proclaimed at a meeting of the Accession Council, with senior politicians who are amongst the members of the Privy Council, including the former prime minister Gordon Brown, present.

Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon and Holyrood Presiding Officer Alison Johnstone were also there.

Later, the new King dedicated himself to the task now before him and the “heavy responsibilities of Sovereignty”.