MSP denies Tories are now ‘two parties’ following PM resignation call

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  • Jacob Rees-Mogg
    British politician (born 1969)

A Conservative MSP has denied the Tories are now “two parties”, following Douglas Ross’ call for the Prime Minister to resign.

Craig Hoy also reacted to the latest allegations of Downing Street parties, saying that it was “very hard to understand” how anyone thought the behaviour was acceptable.

Mr Ross called for the Prime Minister to go on Wednesday, which led to leader of the House of Commons Jacob Rees-Mogg calling the Scottish Conservative leader “quite a lightweight figure”.

The Tory MSP group has supported Mr Ross, with one saying Mr Rees-Mogg should “have a long lie down”.

Cabinet Meeting
One MSP said Jacob Rees-Mogg should ‘have a long lie down’ (Aaron Chown/PA)

Speaking on the BBC’s Good Morning Scotland radio programme, it was suggested to My Hoy that the Conservatives sounded like “two different parties”.

Mr Hoy said: “We’re not two parties at all.”

He continued: “There’s absolute unanimity that we believe in Scotland remaining in the UK.

“We want to take the fight to the SNP, we want to hold Nicola Sturgeon to account for her failures in office.”

Asked about Mr Rees-Mogg’s view of the Scottish Conservative leader, Mr Hoy said: “Jacob Rees-Mogg is entitled to his view and it is no surprise to you that I disagree with him.

“I think if you look across the cabinet there was no support for what Jacob Rees-Mogg said.

“Many MPs and also members of the cabinet, including (Scottish Secretary) Alister Jack, disagreed with him.”

Coronavirus – Wed Jan 12, 2022
There have been reports of a Downing Street leaving party in April 2021 (Stefan Rousseau/PA)

Mr Hoy was also asked about reports of a leaving party being held in Downing Street on April 16 2021.

James Slack, who last year left No 10 to become deputy editor-in-chief at The Sun, said the party in April “should not have happened at the time that it did”.

Mr Hoy said: “These are people who are meant to understand political communications.

“I worked in political communications for a long time, that’s why I find it very hard to understand how they ever thought this would be an OK way to behave.”

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