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MTA worker smashed in head with glass bottle — an hour after Hochul vowed National Guardsmen for NYC subways

photo of National Guardsmen
Gov. Kathy Hochul vowed to flood the subway stations with National Guardsmen after a spate of violent crime in the city's underground.

An MTA conductor was randomly whacked in the head with a glass bottle by a stranger in the Bronx Wednesday — an hour after Gov. Kathy Hochul announced she will flood the subway system with National Guardsmen to thwart a crime surge in the city’s underground.

The 38-year-old conductor was in her cabin on a southbound No. 4 train at the 170 Street and Jerome Avenue station in Mt. Eden when the unhinged man suddenly smashed a bottle over her head just before noon, according to cops.

She reported the attack at the next station and was taken to NYC Health + Hospitals/Lincoln in stable condition, the NYPD said.

Gov. Kathy Hochul vowed send about 750 National Guardsmen to NYC subways after a spate of violent crime in the city’s underground. Stephen Yang
Gov. Kathy Hochul vowed send about 750 National Guardsmen to NYC subways after a spate of violent crime in the city’s underground. Stephen Yang

Her attacker fled the station after the incident, according to the NYPD. He was still on the loose later Wednesday.

The assault came days after 59-year-old MTA worker Alton Scott was slashed in the neck at a Brooklyn subway station while also working inside his cabin.

Scott, a 24-year transit veteran, received 34 stitches and required nine sutures to close the stomach-churning wound, transit officials said.

Scott vowed to never go back on the train after the random slashing.

“I don’t see myself going back on that train, that’s not for me anymore,” the spooked conductor told The Post. 

“If I go back to work, I would not go on the train,” Scott said. “I’m too traumatized to do that. If I go back, they’ll have to find something else for me to do.”

Wednesday’s assault unfolded after the governor promised to deploy 1,000 New York National Guardsmen, state police, and MTA cops to carry out bag checks in Big Apple subway stations.

“These brazen heinous attacks on our subway system will not be tolerated,” Hochul said while announcing her plan.

“No one heading to their job or to visit family or go to a doctor appointment should worry that the person sitting next to them possesses a deadly weapon,” Hochul continued.

“They shouldn’t worry about whether someone’s going to brandish a knife or gun,” she said. “That’s what we’re going to do with these checkpoints.”