Noel Edmonds opens up about suicide attempt

Louise McCreesh
Photo credit: Mark Thompson/Getty Images

From Digital Spy

Warning: The following article contains discussion of suicide that some readers may find triggering.

Noel Edmonds has revealed that he once tried to take his own life after he was targeted by fraudsters.

The former Deal or No Deal presenter is seeking £73 million in compensation after he was conned by a HBOS scam back in 2005.

As well as bringing an end to his audio programming company Unique Group, Noel added that the ordeal almost had far more serious consequences.

The TV personality recalled how he fell into a "bottomless dark space" following the incident, which eventually led to a suicide attempt.

Photo credit: Channel 4 / Endemol

"Until these criminals took me to the brink of emotional annihilation, I'd always felt those who opt out by taking their own lives were selfish and cowardly," Noel told PA.

"But, having been cast into that bottomless dark space devoid of logic and reason, I have a much deeper understanding of life without hope."

He added: "I seek no sympathy and feel no shame in admitting that on the evening of January 18, 2005, I attempted to end the overwhelming mental pain which had consumed my whole being.

"The fact I did not become another suicide statistic is solely due to the swift response of a Devon ambulance crew and compassionate support of the Priory in Bristol."

Photo credit: Endemol

Lloyds Banking Group, which rescued HBOS during the financial crisis in 2008, has promised to make compensation offers to fraud victims from a £100m pot.

A bank spokesperson said in a statement: "Our customers' safety is of paramount importance to us.

"We have a clear policy that if a customer says that they are considering taking their own life that we must take the statement seriously and take action to protect them.

"In such instances, police are notified and, where possible, provided with the customer's location in order that they can go to the customer and ensure their safety."

Suicide is preventable. Readers who are affected by the issues raised in this story are encouraged to contact Samaritans on 116 123 (www.samaritans.org), or Mind on 0300 123 3393 (www.mind.org.uk). Readers in the US are encouraged to contact the National Suicide Prevention Line on 1-800-273-8255.

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