Nottingham hospital urged to protect 'extraordinary' Victorian building among UK's most endangered

The Victorian Society, which campaigns to preserve and promote buildings built between 1837 and 1914, has listed St Lukes’ Chapel on Nottingham City Hospital as one of the most endangered notable structures from the period.
-Credit: (Image: Ian Wells)


A Nottingham hospital has been urged to protect an "extraordinary" chapel after a charity placed it on a list of at-risk historic buildings. The Victorian Society, which campaigns to preserve and promote buildings built between 1837 and 1914, has listed St Lukes’ Chapel on Nottingham City Hospital as one of the most endangered notable structures from the period.

The Grade II-listed chapel was built in the Arts and Crafts style by Arthur Marshall in 1902 as part of the Bagthorpe Workhouse, with it being used by inmates and staff. It later became part of the City Hospital, providing a private space for patients, staff and visitors until 1988, when it was replaced by a new chapel inside the hospital's main building.

The structure, which is now used for storage and has deteriorated visually over recent decades, should be saved and repurposed before it goes into ruin, according to James Hughes of the Victorian Society. "This must be one of the most extraordinary hospital chapels anywhere," Mr Hughes said.

Get the latest news straight to your phone by joining us on WhatsApp

"The longer the building goes without a sustainable purpose, the higher the cost of securing its fabric, and the greater the eventual burden will be on the NHS. Doing nothing is not an option. A building this remarkable deserves a proper use.’

The chapel's interior has been largely stripped of its fixtures and fittings since 2009, the society said. The conservationists said the chapel had featured a Baroque-style pulpit and baluster-stemmed lectern before it was cleared out.

The white altar rails had turned balusters, and there was a font towards the rear. In addition, there used to be a painting on the west wall by L. Pompignali of Florence, who copied a 16th-century triptych of the crucifixion by Pietro Perugino.

Fittingly the chapel is dedicated to St Luke the Evangelist, an apostle who was a physician. Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, which runs City Hospital and Queen's Medical Centre, has been approached for comment but did not respond in time for publication.