Novak Djokovic's grand slam dreams ended by mighty Daniil Medvedev in US Open final

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·3-min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.

Novak Djokovic lost his chance of becoming the first male tennis star to win a 21st grand slam title and the first player in over 50 years to win all four major tournaments in the same year, after he was defeated by Daniil Medvedev in the US Open final.

Medvedev put in a stunning performance at Flushing Meadows to clinch his first major title, beating the world number one in straight sets, 6-4 6-4 6-4.

Speaking at a news conference after the match, Djokovic, 34, said: "Of course, part of me is very sad. It's a tough one to swallow, this loss, considering everything that was on the line.

"But, on the other hand, I felt something I never felt in my life here in New York. The crowd made me (feel) very special. I did not expect anything, but the amount of support and energy and love I got from the crowd was something that I'll remember forever.

"That's the reason on the changeover I just teared up. The emotion, the energy was so strong. It's as strong as winning 21 grand slams. They touched my heart, honestly."

By winning the Australian Open, French Open and Wimbledon titles, Djokovic gave himself the chance to do what only Don Budge and Rod Laver have ever managed in the men's game by claiming all four titles in the same year.

But the last hurdle with Medvedev, who is nine years his junior, proved simply beyond him.

Djokovic said: "I was just below par with my game. My legs were not there. I was trying. I did my best. I made a lot of unforced errors. I had no serve really.

"If you're playing someone like Medvedev, who hits his spots so well, just aces, gets a lot of free points on his first serve, you're constantly feeling pressure on your service games. It was just one of these days where unfortunately it wasn't meant to be.

"It was a very demanding period for me in the last five, six months. Everything was coming together for me here and kind of accumulating all the emotions that I've been through.

"Unfortunately I didn't make it in the final step. But, when you draw a line, you have to be very satisfied with the year. Three slams and a final.

"And in tennis we learn very quickly how to turn the next page. Very soon there are some more challenges, more things that are coming up. I have learned to overcome these kind of tough losses in the finals of slams, the ones that hurt the most.

"I still love this sport and I still feel good on the court. As long as there is motivation and that flair, I'll keep riding."

Medvedev, 25, is just the second man born in the 1990s to win a slam singles title after last year's champion Dominic Thiem and only the third along with Andy Murray and Stan Wawrinka to beat one of the big three in a slam final since Juan Martin Del Potro defeated Federer in New York 12 years ago.

"I do feel sorry for Novak because I cannot imagine what he feels," said Medvedev after his victory.

"For the confidence and for my future career, knowing that I beat somebody who was 27-0 in a year in grand slams, I lost to him in Australia, he was going for huge history, and knowing that I managed to stop him definitely makes it sweeter and brings me confidence for what is to come."

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting