One in 5 dog owners who bought a ‘pandemic puppy’ consider rehoming their pet

·2-min read
An estimated 3.2 million UK households acquired a new pet during lockdown (Getty Images)
An estimated 3.2 million UK households acquired a new pet during lockdown (Getty Images)

Almost one in five people who bought a puppy during the pandemic are now considering rehoming their new dog, research has found. 

An estimated 3.2 million UK households welcomed a new pet into their family during lockdown, with dogs and cats the most popular animals, according to Pet Food Manufacturers’ Association.

But now pandemic restrictions are easing, and people are returning to work, some owners have said they worried they will no longer be able to care for them, according to the Kennel Club

Almost a quarter of owners fear they will not be able to provide a suitable home for their dog post-lockdown and 17 percent have considered rehoming, the survey found.

Some dog owners have said they worried they will no longer be able to care for their new pets (Getty Images)
Some dog owners have said they worried they will no longer be able to care for their new pets (Getty Images)

The Kennel Club warned the UK was facing a looming “welfare crisis for pandemic pups” unless more workplaces become dog friendly. 

Bill Lambert from the The Kennel Club said: “This new research worryingly shows that if dogs can’t go to places with their owners, and fit their lifestyle post-pandemic, some will be left home alone for too long, or even sadly rehomed or abandoned. 

 “These consequences could be quite devastating for the nation’s dogs, who frankly don’t deserve to be left behind after being a lifeline for so many during lockdown.”

As many as 21 percent of owners admit leaving their dog at home alone for long periods of time, according to the research.

Watch: 3 must-have products for dog owners

And 14 percent said they have left their pet in the car while shopping, the study found.

The Dog’s Trust charity warned between August 2020 and January 2021 there was a 41 percent increase in traffic to its Giving Up Your Dog webpage. 

While Battersea Dogs & Cats Home has predicted it will see almost 27 percent more dogs abandoned in the next five years.

Mr Lambert urged the hospitality, business and workplace circles to make places more dog friendly for people across the UK.

He added: “Hospitality, businesses and workplaces can play a role in combatting the looming welfare crisis faced by this pandemic pup generation by being open for dogs; helping owners to introduce or re-introduce their pet to ‘normal’, without leaving them behind.”

Read More

Pet owners can pass on Covid to their cats and dogs, warns scientist

New top dog in Downing Street: Rishi Sunak welcomes puppy into No.11

Russell Brand ‘devastated’ after his dog mauls wallaby to death near his Oxfordshire home

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting