Partner of US journalist Alison Parker shot dead live on air runs for political office

Jasmine Andersson
Alison Parker WDBJ7

The partner of WDBJ-TV journalist Alison Parker who was shot dead live on air in August 2015, aged 24, will be running for political office to fend off a pro-gun political candidate.

Chris Hurst, who was left devastated after former WDBJ-TV journalist Vester Flanagan shot his partner and cameraman Adam Ward live on air, decided that he wanted to give back to his community as a Democratic candidate in honour of his late partner.

Trending: Donald Trump appoints anti-abortion crusader Charmaine Yoest to health agency

Hurst, also previously a journalist, decided to reshape his career to run for the Virginia House of Delegates so that he could fight for a cause he believes in.

"As a member of the Virginia House of Delegates, Chris will take that same passionate work ethic to Richmond and help create solutions to our problems, not just report them," reads the candidate's website.

Don't miss: EU's Jean-Claude Juncker believes Theresa May is 'deluded' over Brexit talks

"I knew that I could get myself up and pull myself together and do it, but I think it was at the price of my humanity," Hurst said.

"When we understand that life is fragile, does that mean we give up and say life ain't worth it? No," Hurst said at a local Democratic committee meeting in March.

Most popular: Concerned with Brexit negotiations, Tony Blair decides to return to UK politics

"That's when we say it is worth it, and we do what we can when we're here to try to help another person."

Now, the 29-year-old's grief is said to be lessening because he feels like what he is doing has a purpose.

"It has given him determination," said Alison's father, Andy Parker, to ABC news. "We both had to seek a way to make sense out of all of this."

Hurst is one of several young Democrats new to politics running for a Virginia House seat this year. President Donald Trump's election has fuelled a new interest in state and local politics, party leaders say.

With the surge in youth interest and engagement, the Democrats have the potential to put a dent in Republicans' sizable House majority.

You may be interested in:

By using Yahoo you agree that Yahoo and partners may use Cookies for personalisation and other purposes