Latest Phone Hacking News

  • Miliband urged to publish tax deed
    Miliband urged to publish tax deed Fri, Feb 13, 2015

    Conservatives have sought to step up pressure on Ed Miliband over the issue of tax avoidance by demanding that he publish a legal document which altered his father's will to grant him part-ownership of the family home. More »

  • Mirror prints phone-hacking apology
    Mirror prints phone-hacking apology Fri, Feb 13, 2015

    Trinity Mirror has publicly apologised for phone hacking and said civil claims will cost the company millions more than first thought. More »

  • Hugh Grant finds surprise salvation as an academic in 'The Rewrite'
    Hugh Grant finds surprise salvation as an academic in 'The Rewrite' Thu, Feb 12, 2015

    By Patricia Reaney NEW YORK (Reuters) - British actor Hugh Grant may be one of the most successful actors of his generation, but the star of the new film "The Rewrite" says he has always been attracted to the comedy of failure. Grant, 54, plays Keith Michaels, a divorced Hollywood screenwriter facing hard times who finds romance and new meaning in life when he takes a college teaching job to avoid bankruptcy. "It is a story of one man's surprise salvation," Grant told Reuters. More »

  • Cameron rebuffs 'dodgy PM' jibe
    Cameron rebuffs 'dodgy PM' jibe Wed, Feb 11, 2015

    David Cameron has dismissed claims that he is a "dodgy Prime Minister" who is "up to his neck" in the HSBC tax avoidance scandal, accusing Ed Miliband of repeating "fiction after fiction" about the Conservatives. More »

  • Syriza and the new economic narrative
    Syriza and the new economic narrative Sat, Feb 7, 2015

    Greece's Syriza party challenges the media narrative on austerity. And, the close ties between journalists and NGOs. More »

  • Exclusive - Top Fox investors seek to convert voting shares, Murdoch may benefit: …
    Exclusive - Top Fox investors seek to convert voting shares, Murdoch may benefit: … Fri, Feb 6, 2015

    By Nadia Damouni and Liana B. Baker NEW YORK (Reuters) - Several top investors in Twenty-First Century Fox Inc are pressing for the right to swap their voting shares for ordinary shares, which are trading at an unusual premium, even though the move could hand even more control of the company to Rupert Murdoch, according to people familiar with the matter. Fox's dual-class share structure already gives the 83-year-old media mogul control over 39.7 percent of voting rights, even though he and his family hold only a 12 percent equity stake. Several Fox investors, which collectively own 8 percent of voting rights, have been unhappy about the relative performance of their shares since the company delisted from the Australian stock exchange last May, the people said. Historically, the voting shares had traded at a premium. More »

  • Archers settle phone-hacking claims
    Archers settle phone-hacking claims Wed, Feb 4, 2015

    Jeffrey and Mary Archer and their son James have settled their phone-hacking claims against News Group Newspapers (NGN). More »

  • News Corp.: No US charges in UK phone-hacking scandal Tue, Feb 3, 2015

    NEW YORK (AP) — Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. and Twenty-First Century Fox say the U.S. Justice Department has closed a lengthy investigation into a phone-hacking scandal in Britain without filing any charges. More »

  • Murdoch's firms won't face US phone hacking charges
    Murdoch's firms won't face US phone hacking charges Tue, Feb 3, 2015

    News Corp. Executive Chairman Rupert Murdoch, seen here on October 31, 2013, split his empire into two entities following a phone-hacking scandal More »

  • U.S. Justice Dept drops News Corp probe related to phone hacking
    U.S. Justice Dept drops News Corp probe related to phone hacking Mon, Feb 2, 2015

    (Reuters) - The United States Department of Justice has decided not to prosecute News Corp or its sister company Twenty-First Century Fox after completing an investigation of scandals in Great Britain involving phone hacking and alleged bribery of public officials. The end of the probe, disclosed by News Corp in a regulatory filing on Monday, comes after the U.S. government spent years combing through thousands of e-mails from News Corp's servers. A U.S. law enforcement official confirmed to Reuters that the case, which included an investigation of possible violations of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, had been closed by the Justice Department. News Corp was notified about the decision on Jan. 28. More »

  • Colombia's ex-spy chief surrenders in Panama
    Colombia's ex-spy chief surrenders in Panama Sun, Feb 1, 2015

    Maria del Pilar Hurtado was wanted for role in illegal wiretapping ring that targeted journalists and politicians. More »

  • Opinion: Drones may be fun, but they also pose complex legal and safety cha …
    Opinion: Drones may be fun, but they also pose complex legal and safety cha … Fri, Jan 30, 2015

    Novelty may give way to concerns over annoyance, nuisance, privacy, trespass and safety. More »

  • Courts 'expensive and inefficient'
    Courts 'expensive and inefficient' Fri, Jan 23, 2015

    The criminal justice system is inefficient, time-consuming and too expensive, a new report claims, as a series of recommendations are set out to make it more streamlined. More »

  • Jury fails to reach verdicts in UK tabloid bribery trial Thu, Jan 22, 2015

    LONDON (AP) — A British jury has failed to reach a verdict at the trial of four journalists from the tabloid Sun accused of bribing police and public officials for scoops. More »

  • Cilla and others settle hacking cases
    Cilla and others settle hacking cases Thu, Jan 22, 2015

    Cilla Black, Jessie Wallace and Peter Andre are among the latest celebrities to settle their hacking claims. More »

  • Cilla and others settle hack cases
    Cilla and others settle hack cases Thu, Jan 22, 2015

    Cilla Black is among the latest group of celebrities to settle phone hacking claims for "substantial" damages, the High Court has heard. More »

  • Sun staff face retrial ordeal
    Sun staff face retrial ordeal Thu, Jan 22, 2015

    Four Sun journalists accused of corrupting public officials face a retrial after a jury failed to reach verdicts following a three-month hearing. More »

  • Topless page three returns to Britain's The Sun
    Topless page three returns to Britain's The Sun Thu, Jan 22, 2015

    British tabloid The Sun published a photo of a winking topless model on Thursday, shooting down reports it had ended the controversial tradition that has featured in the newspaper since 1970. More »

  • Sun payments trial juror discharged
    Sun payments trial juror discharged Wed, Jan 21, 2015

    A juror in the trial of four senior Sun journalists accused of plotting to pay public officials for stories has been discharged after "feeling under a great deal of pressure", a court has heard. More »

  • Page 3's Insidious Sexism
    Page 3's Insidious Sexism Tue, Jan 20, 2015

    Until Sunday, Page 3 was the kind of thing that was so archaic, so absurdly anachronistic, and yet so reliable a feature of daily life in Britain that it was occasionally necessary to stop and fully comprehend the fact that in 2015, the third page of the nation’s most-read newspaper featured pictures of topless women. Page 3 has been a feature of The Sun, the Rupert Murdoch-owned British daily, since November 1970, and in many ways, it’s remained a portal to that bygone era of low-lit, gauzy soft porn and carefree sexism ever since. “Mellisa, 21, from Kent,” for example, once advocated for better transportation infrastructure by citing “American feminist and lawyer Carol Moseley Braun;” on another occasion, “Courtnie, 21, from Plymouth” quoted Ralph Waldo Emerson while bemoaning spending cuts. Politicians from all three major British parties, aware of the paper’s outsize ability to sway elections, have long declined to criticize Page 3, with Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg warning against the specter of “a moral policeman or woman in Whitehall telling people what they can and cannot see,” and Prime Minster David Cameron refusing to back legislation restricting sexual images in newspapers even while drafting sweeping initiatives to limit access to online pornography. More »

  • The Sun covers them up, ending Page 3 topless tradition
    The Sun covers them up, ending Page 3 topless tradition Tue, Jan 20, 2015

    The Sun newspaper has quietly ended a decades-old tradition of putting topless women on page 3 in a setback for schoolboy fantasies that was welcomed by women around the country. More »

  • Two cleared over 'cash-for-stories'
    Two cleared over 'cash-for-stories' Fri, Jan 16, 2015

    Two members of staff at the Sun newspaper have been acquitted of corrupting public officials. More »

  • Evidence prompts rethink in Pakistan cricketers' case: report
    Evidence prompts rethink in Pakistan cricketers' case: report Fri, Jan 16, 2015

    Prosecutors are re-examining the criminal convictions of three Pakistan players jailed in 2011 over spot-fixing allegations, according to a report in Britain's Guardian newspaper. More »

  • 'Fake Sheikh' evidence sees fixing trial collapse
    'Fake Sheikh' evidence sees fixing trial collapse Thu, Jan 15, 2015

    Prosecutors have dropped a case of alleged match-fixing involving 13 footballers in England because of doubts about the reliability of evidence from journalist Mazher Mahmood -- the so-called 'Fake Sheikh' -- it was announced Wednesday. More »

  • Hacking journalist avoids jail term
    Hacking journalist avoids jail term Thu, Dec 18, 2014

    A former Sunday Mirror journalist has avoided jail after he handed himself in to police to confess to hacking the phone of a soap actress. More »

  • Here is what we have learned from the Sony hacks so far
    Here is what we have learned from the Sony hacks so far Mon, Dec 15, 2014

    The studio has found itself at the centre of a massive hacking scandal over the past week. More »

  • Long-serving editor of Guardian newspaper to step down
    Long-serving editor of Guardian newspaper to step down Wed, Dec 10, 2014

    LONDON (Reuters) - Alan Rusbridger, editor of Britain's Guardian newspaper, who helped break news of widespread surveillance by the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) based on the leaks of analyst Edward Snowden, will step down next Summer, its parent company said on Wednesday. Rusbridger, 60, who has been editing the left-leaning newspaper for nearly 20 years, will become chairman of the company's Scott Trust, which safeguards the paper's editorial independence, in 2016. ... More »

  • Britain to review 25 'Fake Sheikh' convictions
    Britain to review 25 'Fake Sheikh' convictions Thu, Dec 4, 2014

    Twenty-five convictions secured through evidence given by British tabloid reporter Mazher Mahmood -- nicknamed the Fake Sheikh -- will be reviewed because of doubts over his reliability as a witness, prosecutors said Thursday. More »

  • Top woman officer leaves police
    Top woman officer leaves police Mon, Dec 1, 2014

    Britain's most senior female police officer - Scotland Yard's assistant commissioner Cressida Dick - is leaving the service after 31 years. More »

  • Judge: British minister did call policemen 'plebs'
    Judge: British minister did call policemen 'plebs' Thu, Nov 27, 2014

    LONDON (AP) — Britain's High Court has weighed in on a big scandal over one small word, saying a government minister did call a policeman by the "politically toxic" insult "pleb." More »

  • UK tabloid journalist cleared of bribery charge
    UK tabloid journalist cleared of bribery charge Wed, Nov 26, 2014

    A former journalist with media tycoon Rupert Murdoch's British tabloid The Sun was on Wednesday cleared of paying a government official for stories, following a trial triggered by the phone-hacking scandal. More »

  • British tabloid reporter cleared of bribery charge Wed, Nov 26, 2014

    LONDON (AP) — A journalist with Rupert Murdoch-owned tabloid The Sun has been cleared of bribing a press officer for stories about government spending plans. More »

  • Journalist phone records given to UK police in data breach
    Journalist phone records given to UK police in data breach Wed, Nov 26, 2014

    Telecoms giant Vodafone gave British police the mobile phone records of 1,700 people working for News UK, the company that publishes several top British newspapers, The Times reported. More »

  • UK police spied on reporters for years, docs show
    UK police spied on reporters for years, docs show Mon, Nov 24, 2014

    LONDON (AP) — Freelance video journalist Jason Parkinson returned home from vacation this year to find a brown paper envelope in his mailbox. He opened it to find nine years of his life laid out in shocking detail. More »

  • Coulson Faces Tagging After Early Jail Release
    Coulson Faces Tagging After Early Jail Release Fri, Nov 21, 2014

    Former News Of The World editor Andy Coulson has been released from prison having served less than five months of an 18-month sentence for phone hacking. More »