Pictures from space! Our image of the day

Space.com Staff
·58-min read
 Today, NASA astronauts Victor Glover and Mike Hopkins are stepping outside the International Space Station for Glover's first spacewalk, or extravehicular activity (EVA). In this photo, you can see Glover preparing for the spacewalk, which will be his first. During the EVA, the pair will install a new antenna on the Columbus module on the outside of the space station.
Today, NASA astronauts Victor Glover and Mike Hopkins are stepping outside the International Space Station for Glover's first spacewalk, or extravehicular activity (EVA). In this photo, you can see Glover preparing for the spacewalk, which will be his first. During the EVA, the pair will install a new antenna on the Columbus module on the outside of the space station.

Space can be a wondrous place, and we've got the pictures to prove it! Take a look at our favorite pictures from space here, and if you're wondering what happened today in space history don't miss our On This Day in Space video show here!
 

Victor Glover leaves the station

Today, NASA astronauts Victor Glover and Mike Hopkins are stepping outside the International Space Station for Glover's first spacewalk, or extravehicular activity (EVA). In this photo, you can see Glover preparing for the spacewalk, which will be his first. During the EVA, the pair will install a new antenna on the Columbus module on the outside of the space station.
Today, NASA astronauts Victor Glover and Mike Hopkins are stepping outside the International Space Station for Glover's first spacewalk, or extravehicular activity (EVA). In this photo, you can see Glover preparing for the spacewalk, which will be his first. During the EVA, the pair will install a new antenna on the Columbus module on the outside of the space station.

Jan. 27, 2021: Today, NASA astronauts Victor Glover and Mike Hopkins are stepping outside the International Space Station for Glover's first spacewalk, or extravehicular activity (EVA). In this photo, you can see Glover preparing for the spacewalk, which will be his first. During the EVA, the pair will install a new antenna on the Columbus module on the outside of the space station. -- Chelsea Gohd 

Preparing for ColKa

NASA astronauts Michael Hopkins and Victor Glover will be stepping outside the confines of the International Space Station for a spacewalk tomorrow (Jan. 27, 2021) during which the pair will install European payloads outside the station. In this image, you can see European Space Agency astronaut Andreas Mogensen installing the Columbus Ka-band (ColKa) terminal, one of the things to be installed during the upcoming spacewalk, during a test at the Neutral Buoyancy Lab.
NASA astronauts Michael Hopkins and Victor Glover will be stepping outside the confines of the International Space Station for a spacewalk tomorrow (Jan. 27, 2021) during which the pair will install European payloads outside the station. In this image, you can see European Space Agency astronaut Andreas Mogensen installing the Columbus Ka-band (ColKa) terminal, one of the things to be installed during the upcoming spacewalk, during a test at the Neutral Buoyancy Lab.

Jan. 26, 2021: NASA astronauts Michael Hopkins and Victor Glover will be stepping outside the confines of the International Space Station for a spacewalk tomorrow (Jan. 27, 2021) during which the pair will install European payloads outside the station. In this image, you can see European Space Agency astronaut Andreas Mogensen installing the Columbus Ka-band (ColKa) terminal, one of the things to be installed during the upcoming spacewalk, during a test at the Neutral Buoyancy Lab. -- Chelsea Gohd

An aurora from space

These images, taken from the International Space Station, show Earth's glowing, colorful aurora alongside lights coming from the cities on our planet's surface down below. Aurora is a natural phenomenon in which colorful lights in the sky, which often appear as green, red, yellow or white, are displayed when electrically-charged particles from the sun interact with gases like oxygen or nitrogen in our planet's atmosphere.
These images, taken from the International Space Station, show Earth's glowing, colorful aurora alongside lights coming from the cities on our planet's surface down below. Aurora is a natural phenomenon in which colorful lights in the sky, which often appear as green, red, yellow or white, are displayed when electrically-charged particles from the sun interact with gases like oxygen or nitrogen in our planet's atmosphere.

Jan. 25, 2021: These images, taken from the International Space Station, show Earth's glowing, colorful aurora alongside lights coming from the cities on our planet's surface down below. Aurora is a natural phenomenon in which colorful lights in the sky, which often appear as green, red, yellow or white, are displayed when electrically-charged particles from the sun interact with gases like oxygen or nitrogen in our planet's atmosphere. -- Chelsea Gohd. 

Science and spacewalk training

NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins flashes a big smile in a photo posted by the International Space Station on Jan. 21, 2021. The photo shows Hopkins with some other crew members and a pair of spacesuits in the background, surrounded by equipment, working on science experiments and training for an upcoming pair of spacewalks.
NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins flashes a big smile in a photo posted by the International Space Station on Jan. 21, 2021. The photo shows Hopkins with some other crew members and a pair of spacesuits in the background, surrounded by equipment, working on science experiments and training for an upcoming pair of spacewalks.

Jan. 22, 2021: NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins flashes a big smile in a photo posted by the International Space Station on Jan. 21, 2021. The photo shows Hopkins with some other crew members and a pair of spacesuits in the background, surrounded by equipment, working on science experiments and training for an upcoming pair of spacewalks. -- Chelsea Gohd

A barred spiral galaxy

NGC 613, a barred spiral galaxy 67 million light-years away in the southern constellation of Sculptor, shows its stunning stellar markings in this image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. The galaxy, which was first discovered in 1798,  is most recognizable by its long "arms," that spiral around its nucleus clearly.
NGC 613, a barred spiral galaxy 67 million light-years away in the southern constellation of Sculptor, shows its stunning stellar markings in this image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. The galaxy, which was first discovered in 1798, is most recognizable by its long "arms," that spiral around its nucleus clearly.

Jan. 21, 2021: NGC 613, a barred spiral galaxy 67 million light-years away in the southern constellation of Sculptor, shows its stunning stellar markings in this image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. The galaxy, which was first discovered in 1798,  is most recognizable by its long "arms," that spiral around its nucleus clearly. -- Chelsea Gohd

'Do not touch' on the space station

A sign reading "do not touch" labels this Matiss experiment on board the International Space Station. The experiment tests the antibacterial capabilities of hydrophobic (water-repelling) surfaces on the space station. With experiments like this, researchers can learn more about how microscopic organisms like bacteria live in space and how the crew can keep the station clean of illness-causing microorganisms.
A sign reading "do not touch" labels this Matiss experiment on board the International Space Station. The experiment tests the antibacterial capabilities of hydrophobic (water-repelling) surfaces on the space station. With experiments like this, researchers can learn more about how microscopic organisms like bacteria live in space and how the crew can keep the station clean of illness-causing microorganisms.

Jan. 20, 2020: A sign reading "do not touch" labels this Matiss experiment on board the International Space Station. The experiment tests the antibacterial capabilities of hydrophobic (water-repelling) surfaces on the space station. With experiments like this, researchers can learn more about how microscopic organisms like bacteria live in space and how the crew can keep the station clean of illness-causing microorganisms. -- Chelsea Gohd

The Sahara from space

This stunning, sandy, sienna-hued landscape is the Tanezrouft Basin (a desolate region of the Sahara Desert) as seen by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 from space. The extremely arid plain is home to scorching temperatures, little water and vegetation and has even been nicknamed the "Land of Terror." This image was captured as part of Copernicus Sentinel-2, a two-satellite mission that is part of the European Space Agency's Copernicus program.
This stunning, sandy, sienna-hued landscape is the Tanezrouft Basin (a desolate region of the Sahara Desert) as seen by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 from space. The extremely arid plain is home to scorching temperatures, little water and vegetation and has even been nicknamed the "Land of Terror." This image was captured as part of Copernicus Sentinel-2, a two-satellite mission that is part of the European Space Agency's Copernicus program.

Jan. 19, 2021: This stunning, sandy, sienna-hued landscape is the Tanezrouft Basin (a desolate region of the Sahara Desert) as seen by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 from space. The extremely arid plain is home to scorching temperatures, little water and vegetation and has even been nicknamed the "Land of Terror." This image was captured as part of Copernicus Sentinel-2, a two-satellite mission that is part of the European Space Agency's Copernicus program. -- Chelsea Gohd

Space Launch System lights up

The core stage for the first flight of NASA’s Space Launch System rocket is seen in the B-2 Test Stand during a scheduled eight minute duration hot fire test, Saturday, Jan. 16, 2021, at NASA’s Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. The four RS-25 engines fired for a little more than one minute and generated 1.6 million pounds of thrust.
The core stage for the first flight of NASA’s Space Launch System rocket is seen in the B-2 Test Stand during a scheduled eight minute duration hot fire test, Saturday, Jan. 16, 2021, at NASA’s Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. The four RS-25 engines fired for a little more than one minute and generated 1.6 million pounds of thrust.

Jan. 18, 2021:  NASA's first Space Launch System megarocket ignites its four main engines for a critical hot-fire test on Jan. 16 at the agency's Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Mississippi, apparently scaring some nearby birds in this stunning photo from NASA photographer Robert Markowitz.

During the test, the final trial of a series of tests called the Green Run, the SLS rocket fired its engines for just over 1 minute, less than the 8 minutes NASA had hoped for to replicate a full launch into orbit. But despite its shorter-than-planned duration, the test offered a dazzling sight to onlookers (and birds) at the test site. NASA engineers are analyzing the results of the test. -- Tariq Malik

Spotting a supernova

The Hubble Space Telescope spotted a growing, gaseous supernova remnant, known as 1E 0102.2-7219, from a supernova explosion that occurred 1,700 years ago during the fall of the Roman Empire. The star that exploded in the event was from the Small Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy to our own Milky Way Galaxy located about 200,000 light-years away.  At the time of the supernova event, people living in Earth's southern hemisphere would have been able to see the light coming from this blast, though there are no known records of the event from humans on Earth.
The Hubble Space Telescope spotted a growing, gaseous supernova remnant, known as 1E 0102.2-7219, from a supernova explosion that occurred 1,700 years ago during the fall of the Roman Empire. The star that exploded in the event was from the Small Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy to our own Milky Way Galaxy located about 200,000 light-years away. At the time of the supernova event, people living in Earth's southern hemisphere would have been able to see the light coming from this blast, though there are no known records of the event from humans on Earth.

Jan. 15, 2021: The Hubble Space Telescope spotted a growing, gaseous supernova remnant, known as 1E 0102.2-7219, from a supernova explosion that occurred 1,700 years ago during the fall of the Roman Empire. The star that exploded in the event was from the Small Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy to our own Milky Way Galaxy located about 200,000 light-years away. 

At the time of the supernova event, people living in Earth's southern hemisphere would have been able to see the light coming from this blast, though there are no known records of the event from humans on Earth. -- Chelsea Gohd

Microbes and asteroids

The "BioAsteroid" payload from the University of Edinburgh runs aboard the European Space Agency's Kubik facility in the Columbus module on the International Space Station. The miniature laboratory contains asteroid-like rocky fragments and microbes (a mixture of bacteria and fungi). Scientists hope to use this experiment to understand better how these microscopic little organisms interact with the asteroid-like material, which could later inform asteroid mining efforts
The "BioAsteroid" payload from the University of Edinburgh runs aboard the European Space Agency's Kubik facility in the Columbus module on the International Space Station. The miniature laboratory contains asteroid-like rocky fragments and microbes (a mixture of bacteria and fungi). Scientists hope to use this experiment to understand better how these microscopic little organisms interact with the asteroid-like material, which could later inform asteroid mining efforts

Jan. 14, 2021: The "BioAsteroid" payload from the University of Edinburgh runs aboard the European Space Agency's Kubik facility in the Columbus module on the International Space Station. The miniature laboratory contains asteroid-like rocky fragments and microbes (a mixture of bacteria and fungi). Scientists hope to use this experiment to understand better how these microscopic little organisms interact with the asteroid-like material, which could later inform asteroid mining efforts. -- Chelsea Gohd

Watching the weather from space

In this view from space captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-3 satellite, you can see a heavy blanket of snowfall over much of Spain. The image, snapped at 5:40 a.m. EST (1040 GMT) on Jan. 12, shows most of the country covered in snow following storm Filomena, which brought the heaviest snowfall that Spain has seen for 50 years.  Copernicus Sentinel-3 is a two-satellite mission that, with a variety of instruments, observes and monitors Earth's surface from above.
In this view from space captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-3 satellite, you can see a heavy blanket of snowfall over much of Spain. The image, snapped at 5:40 a.m. EST (1040 GMT) on Jan. 12, shows most of the country covered in snow following storm Filomena, which brought the heaviest snowfall that Spain has seen for 50 years. Copernicus Sentinel-3 is a two-satellite mission that, with a variety of instruments, observes and monitors Earth's surface from above.

Jan. 13, 2021: In this view from space captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-3 satellite, you can see a heavy blanket of snowfall over much of Spain. The image, snapped at 5:40 a.m. EST (1040 GMT) on Jan. 12, shows most of the country covered in snow following storm Filomena, which brought the heaviest snowfall that Spain has seen for 50 years. 

Copernicus Sentinel-3 is a two-satellite mission that, with a variety of instruments, observes and monitors Earth's surface from above. -- Chelsea Gohd

Pool practice

Astronauts practice for spaceflight here on Earth in a number of unique ways, including underwater. In this image, astronauts practiced a maneuver designed for the International Space Station underwater at the Neutral Buoyancy Lab, which is operated by NASA. At this testing facility, astronauts get completely suited up as if they were about to go out on a spacewalk and perform spacewalk tasks underwater on a mock space station.  Later this month, NASA astronauts Victor Glover and Mike Hopkins will put their training to the test as they will embark on a spacewalk during which they will install a small, fridge-sized device on the outside of the space station's Columbus module.
Astronauts practice for spaceflight here on Earth in a number of unique ways, including underwater. In this image, astronauts practiced a maneuver designed for the International Space Station underwater at the Neutral Buoyancy Lab, which is operated by NASA. At this testing facility, astronauts get completely suited up as if they were about to go out on a spacewalk and perform spacewalk tasks underwater on a mock space station. Later this month, NASA astronauts Victor Glover and Mike Hopkins will put their training to the test as they will embark on a spacewalk during which they will install a small, fridge-sized device on the outside of the space station's Columbus module.

Jan. 12, 2021: Astronauts practice for spaceflight here on Earth in a number of unique ways, including underwater. In this image, astronauts practiced a maneuver designed for the International Space Station underwater at the Neutral Buoyancy Lab, which is operated by NASA. At this testing facility, astronauts get completely suited up as if they were about to go out on a spacewalk and perform spacewalk tasks underwater on a mock space station. 

Later this month, NASA astronauts Victor Glover and Mike Hopkins will put their training to the test as they will embark on a spacewalk during which they will install a small, fridge-sized device on the outside of the space station's Columbus module. -- Chelsea Gohd

Neon lights

This strange, green glow is actually a new type of star that, until recently, hadn't been observed in X-ray light. Scientists think that this star formed when two white dwarf stars (the leftover stellar cores of stars like our sun) merged into one another, forming a new object that emits X-ray light instead of being destroyed in the collision.
This strange, green glow is actually a new type of star that, until recently, hadn't been observed in X-ray light. Scientists think that this star formed when two white dwarf stars (the leftover stellar cores of stars like our sun) merged into one another, forming a new object that emits X-ray light instead of being destroyed in the collision.

Jan. 11, 2021: This strange, green glow is actually a new type of star that, until recently, hadn't been observed in X-ray light. Scientists think that this star formed when two white dwarf stars (the leftover stellar cores of stars like our sun) merged into one another, forming a new object that emits X-ray light instead of being destroyed in the collision. -- Chelsea Gohd

Galactic fireworks

The galaxy NGC 6946, nicknamed "the Fireworks Galaxy," can be seen in this stunning image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The galaxy got its explosive nickname because, while our Milky Way galaxy has an average of just 1-2 supernovas per century, NGC 6946 has had 10 in the last century.  "The Fireworks Galaxy," the structure of which is somewhere between a full spiral and a barred spiral, can be found 25.2 million light-years from Earth on the border of the constellations Cepheus and Cygnus. -- Chelsea Gohd
The galaxy NGC 6946, nicknamed "the Fireworks Galaxy," can be seen in this stunning image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The galaxy got its explosive nickname because, while our Milky Way galaxy has an average of just 1-2 supernovas per century, NGC 6946 has had 10 in the last century. "The Fireworks Galaxy," the structure of which is somewhere between a full spiral and a barred spiral, can be found 25.2 million light-years from Earth on the border of the constellations Cepheus and Cygnus. -- Chelsea Gohd

Jan. 8, 2021: The galaxy NGC 6946, nicknamed "the Fireworks Galaxy," can be seen in this stunning image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The galaxy got its explosive nickname because, while our Milky Way galaxy has an average of just 1-2 supernovas per century, NGC 6946 has had 10 in the last century. 

"The Fireworks Galaxy," the structure of which is somewhere between a full spiral and a barred spiral, can be found 25.2 million light-years from Earth on the border of the constellations Cepheus and Cygnus. -- Chelsea Gohd

Reflecting on the sun 

What might look like an artistic mosaic from afar is actually 366 images of the sun throughout the year 2020, taken by the European Space Agency's Proba-2 satellite. Proba-2 continuously monitors the Sun and, in this collection of photos, there is one image selected for each day (the "extra" day is from February 29, 2020 which was leap day). These images, which were taken by Proba-2's SWAP camera (which captures ultraviolet wavelengths to show the Sun's extreme atmosphere), have a number of "easter eggs" including partial solar eclipses visible on June 21 and December 14. -- Chelsea Gohd
What might look like an artistic mosaic from afar is actually 366 images of the sun throughout the year 2020, taken by the European Space Agency's Proba-2 satellite. Proba-2 continuously monitors the Sun and, in this collection of photos, there is one image selected for each day (the "extra" day is from February 29, 2020 which was leap day). These images, which were taken by Proba-2's SWAP camera (which captures ultraviolet wavelengths to show the Sun's extreme atmosphere), have a number of "easter eggs" including partial solar eclipses visible on June 21 and December 14. -- Chelsea Gohd

Jan. 7, 2021: What might look like an artistic mosaic from afar is actually 366 images of the sun throughout the year 2020, taken by the European Space Agency's Proba-2 satellite. Proba-2 continuously monitors the Sun and, in this collection of photos, there is one image selected for each day (the "extra" day is from February 29, 2020 which was leap day). These images, which were taken by Proba-2's SWAP camera (which captures ultraviolet wavelengths to show the Sun's extreme atmosphere), have a number of "easter eggs" including partial solar eclipses visible on June 21 and December 14. -- Chelsea Gohd

Space radishes

This up-close photo shows a radish grown to perfection. These radishes serve as a control crop for the radishes currently being grown as part of the Plant Habitat-02 (PH-02) experiment in the microgravity environment onboard the International Space Station. This crop of radishes was grown in the Advanced Plant Habitat inside the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
This up-close photo shows a radish grown to perfection. These radishes serve as a control crop for the radishes currently being grown as part of the Plant Habitat-02 (PH-02) experiment in the microgravity environment onboard the International Space Station. This crop of radishes was grown in the Advanced Plant Habitat inside the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Jan. 6, 2021: This up-close photo shows a radish grown to perfection. These radishes serve as a control crop for the radishes currently being grown as part of the Plant Habitat-02 (PH-02) experiment in the microgravity environment onboard the International Space Station. This crop of radishes was grown in the Advanced Plant Habitat inside the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. -- Chelsea Gohd

A new year in space

The astronauts currently living and working on the International Space Station posed for a festive photo to ring in the new year as 2020 became 2021. NASA astronaut Victor Glover shared the photo on Twitter with the caption "God bless you and this new year! I pray for renewed strength, compassion, and truth and that we can all be surrounded by family and friends..." Glover flew to the space station as part of SpaceX's Crew-1 mission, the company's first fully operational crewed mission to space.
The astronauts currently living and working on the International Space Station posed for a festive photo to ring in the new year as 2020 became 2021. NASA astronaut Victor Glover shared the photo on Twitter with the caption "God bless you and this new year! I pray for renewed strength, compassion, and truth and that we can all be surrounded by family and friends..." Glover flew to the space station as part of SpaceX's Crew-1 mission, the company's first fully operational crewed mission to space.

Jan. 5, 2021: The astronauts currently living and working on the International Space Station posed for a festive photo to ring in the new year as 2020 became 2021. NASA astronaut Victor Glover shared the photo on Twitter with the caption "God bless you and this new year! I pray for renewed strength, compassion, and truth and that we can all be surrounded by family and friends..." Glover flew to the space station as part of SpaceX's Crew-1 mission, the company's first fully operational crewed mission to space. -- Chelsea Gohd

Salad, anyone?

 Radish plants are pictured growing for the Plant Habitat-02 experiment that could help optimize plant growth in the unique environment of space and evaluate nutrition and taste of the plants.
Radish plants are pictured growing for the Plant Habitat-02 experiment that could help optimize plant growth in the unique environment of space and evaluate nutrition and taste of the plants.

Dec. 28, 2020:  This crop of radishes on the International Space Station is a welcome sight of green for astronauts living aboard the orbiting lab. NASA astronaut Kate Rubins grew the space veggies in the Plant Habitat-02 as part of an experiment to study how plants grow in space, and how it affects the nutrition and taste of food plants for astronauts. -- Tariq Malik

Earthrise for Christmas

NASA astronauts took this photo of Earth rising from lunar orbit during the Apollo 8 mission on Dec. 24, 1968.
NASA astronauts took this photo of Earth rising from lunar orbit during the Apollo 8 mission on Dec. 24, 1968.

Dec. 25, 2020:  Three NASA astronauts had a Christmas like no one on Earth in 1968. That's because the Apollo 8 astronauts Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and Bill Anders were visiting the moon. This iconic Earthrise image was captured by the astronauts on Christmas Eve, showing all of humanity from the vantage point of the lunar orbit.  -- Tariq Malik

A Starship flies

SpaceX's Starship SN8 launches on its first high-altitude flight from the company's Boca Chica site in South Texas on Dec. 8, 2020.
SpaceX's Starship SN8 launches on its first high-altitude flight from the company's Boca Chica site in South Texas on Dec. 8, 2020.

Dec. 24, 2020: SpaceX's Starship SN8 prototype lifts off from a pad near Boca Chica, Texas in this view from stunning Dec. 8 test launch of the 12-story rocket. The finned spacecraft flew to an altitude of nearly 8 miles, flipped over and glided back to Earth making an epic explosion during its landing attempt. Despite the explosion, SpaceX hailed the test launch as a successful trial of the Starship concept. A new vehicle, called SN9, is already on the launch pad awaiting its own test flight

On Dec. 23, SpaceX released a new video recap showcasing the Starship SN8 flight. -- Tariq Malik

A 'Molten Ring' in the cosmos

This image, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows the Einstein ring GAL-CLUS-022058s. Einstein rings are created when the light from distant objects like galaxies pass by an extremely massive object. Because of the process known as gravitational lensing, this light is bent and distorted into this amazing, bright curve or "ring." Scientists can use these rings to study galaxies that might otherwise be too faint or far away to see.
This image, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows the Einstein ring GAL-CLUS-022058s. Einstein rings are created when the light from distant objects like galaxies pass by an extremely massive object. Because of the process known as gravitational lensing, this light is bent and distorted into this amazing, bright curve or "ring." Scientists can use these rings to study galaxies that might otherwise be too faint or far away to see.

Dec. 23, 2020: This image, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows the Einstein ring GAL-CLUS-022058s. Einstein rings are created when the light from distant objects like galaxies pass by an extremely massive object. Because of the process known as gravitational lensing, this light is bent and distorted into this amazing, bright curve or "ring." Scientists can use these rings to study galaxies that might otherwise be too faint or far away to see. -- Chelsea Gohd

Space bubbles

This "space bubble" was created by the Multiscale Boiling experiment otherwise known as Rubi. Installed in the Fluid Science Laboratory in the Columbus module of the International Space Station, Rubi helps researchers to understand how boiling acts in the weightless environment of space. In this image, you can see electrostatic forces pulling the bubble upwards.
This "space bubble" was created by the Multiscale Boiling experiment otherwise known as Rubi. Installed in the Fluid Science Laboratory in the Columbus module of the International Space Station, Rubi helps researchers to understand how boiling acts in the weightless environment of space. In this image, you can see electrostatic forces pulling the bubble upwards.

Dec. 22, 2020: This "space bubble" was created by the Multiscale Boiling experiment otherwise known as Rubi. Installed in the Fluid Science Laboratory in the Columbus module of the International Space Station, Rubi helps researchers to understand how boiling acts in the weightless environment of space. In this image, you can see electrostatic forces pulling the bubble upwards. -- Chelsea Gohd

A far-off galaxy

In this image captured by the Hubble Space Telescope, you can see the galaxy NGC 1947, a lenticular galaxy or disc galaxy that's lost most of its interstellar matter. Lenticular galaxies, because of their lost matter, don't have a lot of star formation happening within them. This galaxy was discovered almost 200 years ago and rests in the constellation Dorado (The Dolphinfish) 40 million light-years from Earth.
In this image captured by the Hubble Space Telescope, you can see the galaxy NGC 1947, a lenticular galaxy or disc galaxy that's lost most of its interstellar matter. Lenticular galaxies, because of their lost matter, don't have a lot of star formation happening within them. This galaxy was discovered almost 200 years ago and rests in the constellation Dorado (The Dolphinfish) 40 million light-years from Earth.

Dec. 21, 2020: In this image captured by the Hubble Space Telescope, you can see the galaxy NGC 1947, a lenticular galaxy or disc galaxy that's lost most of its interstellar matter. Lenticular galaxies, because of their lost matter, don't have a lot of star formation happening within them. This galaxy was discovered almost 200 years ago and rests in the constellation Dorado (The Dolphinfish) 40 million light-years from Earth. -- Chelsea Gohd

Snow from space

After a bout of heavy snowfall, the snow-covered Alps can be seen from space in this image snapped by the Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission. Copernicus Sentinel-3 is made up of two satellites and collects data for the European Copernicus environmental monitoring program. With this image, it captured the aftermath of two snowstorms in the Austrian and Italian Alps during which up to a collective 9.8 feet (3 meters) of snow fell.
After a bout of heavy snowfall, the snow-covered Alps can be seen from space in this image snapped by the Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission. Copernicus Sentinel-3 is made up of two satellites and collects data for the European Copernicus environmental monitoring program. With this image, it captured the aftermath of two snowstorms in the Austrian and Italian Alps during which up to a collective 9.8 feet (3 meters) of snow fell.

Dec. 17, 2020: After a bout of heavy snowfall, the snow-covered Alps can be seen from space in this image snapped by the Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission. Copernicus Sentinel-3 is made up of two satellites and collects data for the European Copernicus environmental monitoring program. With this image, it captured the aftermath of two snowstorms in the Austrian and Italian Alps during which up to a collective 9.8 feet (3 meters) of snow fell. -- Chelsea Gohd

A dark storm reverses on Neptune

Astronomers spotted dark swirling vortex on Neptune suddenly reverse direction using the Hubble Space Telescope. The storm, discovered in 2018 using Hubble, began in Neptune's northern hemisphere and was traveling towards the equator. Scientists expected that as this happened the storm would become less and less visible. However, in August 2020, scientists using Hubble noticed the storm changing direction going back northwards.
Astronomers spotted dark swirling vortex on Neptune suddenly reverse direction using the Hubble Space Telescope. The storm, discovered in 2018 using Hubble, began in Neptune's northern hemisphere and was traveling towards the equator. Scientists expected that as this happened the storm would become less and less visible. However, in August 2020, scientists using Hubble noticed the storm changing direction going back northwards.

Dec. 16, 2020: Astronomers spotted a dark swirling vortex on Neptune suddenly reverse direction using the Hubble Space Telescope. The storm, discovered in 2018 using Hubble, began in Neptune's northern hemisphere and was traveling towards the equator. Scientists expected that as this happened the storm would become less and less visible. However, in August 2020, scientists using Hubble noticed the storm changing direction going back northwards. -- Chelsea Gohd. 

Saturn and Jupiter in the evening sky

In this photograph taken from Shenandoah National Park in Luray, Virginia, you can see the planets Saturn and Jupiter nestled close together in the sky at sunset. Saturn and Jupiter are nearing a "great conjunction" on Dec. 21. During the exciting, astronomical event, the two planets will appear to be so close together in the sky, they will be just a tenth of a degree apart from one another.
In this photograph taken from Shenandoah National Park in Luray, Virginia, you can see the planets Saturn and Jupiter nestled close together in the sky at sunset. Saturn and Jupiter are nearing a "great conjunction" on Dec. 21. During the exciting, astronomical event, the two planets will appear to be so close together in the sky, they will be just a tenth of a degree apart from one another.

Dec. 15, 2020: In this photograph taken from Shenandoah National Park in Luray, Virginia, you can see the planets Saturn and Jupiter nestled close together in the sky at sunset. Saturn and Jupiter are nearing a "great conjunction" on Dec. 21. During the exciting, astronomical event, the two planets will appear to be so close together in the sky, they will be just a tenth of a degree apart from one another. -- Chelsea Gohd

Working in space

Expedition 64 crew members, including NASA astronauts Kate Rubins and Soichi Noguchi, worked together to explore medical therapies for both cancer and heart conditions. Members of the crew also swapped out U.S. spacesuits inside of SpaceX's Cargo Dragon resupply ship as one suit was returned to the station and one will go back to Earth for maintenance.
Expedition 64 crew members, including NASA astronauts Kate Rubins and Soichi Noguchi, worked together to explore medical therapies for both cancer and heart conditions. Members of the crew also swapped out U.S. spacesuits inside of SpaceX's Cargo Dragon resupply ship as one suit was returned to the station and one will go back to Earth for maintenance.

Dec. 14, 2020: Expedition 64 crew members, including NASA astronauts Kate Rubins and Soichi Noguchi, worked together to explore medical therapies for both cancer and heart conditions. Members of the crew also swapped out U.S. spacesuits inside of SpaceX's Cargo Dragon resupply ship as one suit was returned to the station and one will go back to Earth for maintenance. -- Chelsea Gohd

A sparkling, cosmic masterpiece

This image seems almost too cartoonish and sparkly to be real, but it is yet another stunning, unique view of the cosmos snapped by the Hubble Space Telescope. To capture this image, Hubble used a single infrared filter with its Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). The image depicts stars near the center of the active galaxy Caldwell 96 (or NGC 2516). There are also a number of background galaxies that are visible (though fuzzy) in the image.
This image seems almost too cartoonish and sparkly to be real, but it is yet another stunning, unique view of the cosmos snapped by the Hubble Space Telescope. To capture this image, Hubble used a single infrared filter with its Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). The image depicts stars near the center of the active galaxy Caldwell 96 (or NGC 2516). There are also a number of background galaxies that are visible (though fuzzy) in the image.

Dec. 11, 2020: This image seems almost too cartoonish and sparkly to be real, but it is yet another stunning, unique view of the cosmos snapped by the Hubble Space Telescope. To capture this image, Hubble used a single infrared filter with its Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). The image depicts stars near the center of the active galaxy Caldwell 96 (or NGC 2516). There are also a number of background galaxies that are visible (though fuzzy) in the image. -- Chelsea Gohd

SN8's test flight goes explosively well

SN8, SpaceX's latest Starship prototype, launched on its first high-altitude test flight last night (Dec. 9, 2020) taking off at 5:45 p.m. EST (2245 GMT) from SpaceX's facility near Boca Chica, Texas. After a spectacular take-off, SN8 guided itself back to the ground where it landed near the launch stand. While the vehicle performed well throughout the test it came in a little too fast for the landing and touched down explosively. Still, the merits of the test flight were many and the SpaceX team, and most notably its founder Elon Musk, was thrilled with how it went.
SN8, SpaceX's latest Starship prototype, launched on its first high-altitude test flight last night (Dec. 9, 2020) taking off at 5:45 p.m. EST (2245 GMT) from SpaceX's facility near Boca Chica, Texas. After a spectacular take-off, SN8 guided itself back to the ground where it landed near the launch stand. While the vehicle performed well throughout the test it came in a little too fast for the landing and touched down explosively. Still, the merits of the test flight were many and the SpaceX team, and most notably its founder Elon Musk, was thrilled with how it went.

Dec. 10, 2020: SN8, SpaceX's latest Starship prototype, launched on its first high-altitude test flight last night (Dec. 9, 2020) taking off at 5:45 p.m. EST (2245 GMT) from SpaceX's facility near Boca Chica, Texas. After a spectacular take-off, SN8 guided itself back to the ground where it landed near the launch stand. While the vehicle performed well throughout the test it came in a little too fast for the landing and touched down explosively. Still, the merits of the test flight were many and the SpaceX team, and most notably its founder Elon Musk, was thrilled with how it went. -- Chelsea Gohd

A 3D printed test ring

This shiny little piece of metal is a test segment from what is known as a launch interface ring, a ring that secures a satellite in place for its tough journey from Earth to space. The ring from which this segment was plucked was 3D printed with an aluminum-magnesium-scandium alloy as part of a European Space Agency Project designed to improve the technique known as LIRAM (Launch Interface Rings by Additive Manufacturing).
This shiny little piece of metal is a test segment from what is known as a launch interface ring, a ring that secures a satellite in place for its tough journey from Earth to space. The ring from which this segment was plucked was 3D printed with an aluminum-magnesium-scandium alloy as part of a European Space Agency Project designed to improve the technique known as LIRAM (Launch Interface Rings by Additive Manufacturing).

Dec. 9, 2020: This shiny little piece of metal is a test segment from what is known as a launch interface ring, a ring that secures a satellite in place for its tough journey from Earth to space. The ring from which this segment was plucked was 3D printed with an aluminum-magnesium-scandium alloy as part of a European Space Agency Project designed to improve the technique known as LIRAM (Launch Interface Rings by Additive Manufacturing). -- Chelsea Gohd

A cosmic wonderland

In this image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, you can see the sparkling, sprawling wonder of space. Featured in this image is the galaxy SDSS J225506.80+005839.9. This galaxy with its long (not exactly catchy) name can be seen in the center right of this image. The recently discovered galaxy lies about 500 million light-years from Earth and is a perfect example of what can be discovered by space telescopes like Hubble.
In this image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, you can see the sparkling, sprawling wonder of space. Featured in this image is the galaxy SDSS J225506.80+005839.9. This galaxy with its long (not exactly catchy) name can be seen in the center right of this image. The recently discovered galaxy lies about 500 million light-years from Earth and is a perfect example of what can be discovered by space telescopes like Hubble.

Dec. 8, 2020: In this image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, you can see the sparkling, sprawling wonder of space. Featured in this image is the galaxy SDSS J225506.80+005839.9. This galaxy with its long (not exactly catchy) name can be seen in the center right of this image. The recently discovered galaxy lies about 500 million light-years from Earth and is a perfect example of what can be discovered by space telescopes like Hubble. -- Chelsea Gohd

New Zealand from space

The Banks Peninsula on the South Island of New Zealand shows off its striking colors in this stunning image taken from space. This image was taken by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission, which is made up of two satellites that orbit our planet, scouring its surface collecting data and paying close attention to bodies of water and how they change over time.
The Banks Peninsula on the South Island of New Zealand shows off its striking colors in this stunning image taken from space. This image was taken by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission, which is made up of two satellites that orbit our planet, scouring its surface collecting data and paying close attention to bodies of water and how they change over time.

Dec. 7, 2020: The Banks Peninsula on the South Island of New Zealand shows off its striking colors in this stunning image taken from space. This image was taken by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission, which is made up of two satellites that orbit our planet, scouring its surface collecting data and paying close attention to bodies of water and how they change over time. -- Chelsea Gohd

Russia's wild rocket launch

A Russian Soyuz-2 rocket carrying a Gonets-M communications satellite launches into orbit on Dec. 3, 2020 from the Plesetsk Cosmodrome in northern Russia.
A Russian Soyuz-2 rocket carrying a Gonets-M communications satellite launches into orbit on Dec. 3, 2020 from the Plesetsk Cosmodrome in northern Russia.

Friday, Dec. 4, 2020: This amazing close-up shows a view of a Soyuz-2 rocket's first stage engines as it launched three new Gonets-M communications satellites and a military nanosatellite into orbit for Russia's Ministry of Defense. The launch occurred Wednesday (Dec. 2) at 10:14 p.m. EST (0114 GMT or 3:14 a.m. Moscow time Thursday, Dec. 3) at the Plesetsk Cosmodrome in northern Russia. You can watch an amazing video of the launch here. -- Tariq Malik

Hubble spots a strange galaxy

The Hubble Space Telescope spotted the galaxy NGC 2770 in this close-up view. The galaxy has been home to four different observed supernovae over the years, making it unusual and especially interesting to scientists studying the far-out cosmos. One of the supernovae spotted in the galaxy, SN 2015bh, was first thought to possibly not be a supernova but rather a strange outburst from an old, massive star. However, it was later correctly classified as a supernova created when a star 8-50 times as massive as our sun died.
The Hubble Space Telescope spotted the galaxy NGC 2770 in this close-up view. The galaxy has been home to four different observed supernovae over the years, making it unusual and especially interesting to scientists studying the far-out cosmos. One of the supernovae spotted in the galaxy, SN 2015bh, was first thought to possibly not be a supernova but rather a strange outburst from an old, massive star. However, it was later correctly classified as a supernova created when a star 8-50 times as massive as our sun died.

Nov. 30, 2020: The Hubble Space Telescope spotted the galaxy NGC 2770 in this close-up view. The galaxy has been home to four different observed supernovae over the years, making it unusual and especially interesting to scientists studying the far-out cosmos. One of the supernovae spotted in the galaxy, SN 2015bh, was first thought to possibly not be a supernova but rather a strange outburst from an old, massive star. However, it was later correctly classified as a supernova created when a star 8-50 times as massive as our sun died. 

Happy 'Black Hole' Friday!

An artist's depiction of a black hole.
An artist's depiction of a black hole.

Nov. 27, 2020: While people flock to stores online and in person for annual Black Friday sales, NASA wants you to think a bit more cosmic with Black Hole Friday. 

This image is an artist's depiction of a black hole, an object with such a strong gravitational pull that not even light can escape. What falls in can't get out. Check out our black hole primer here and wow you're friends for cosmic facts while searching for Black Friday deals! -- Tariq Malik

Where Do Black Holes Lead?
The strangest black holes in the universe
No Escape: Dive Into a Black Hole (Infographic)

The first space Thanksgiving

NASA's Skylab 4 astronauts Edward Gibson (left) and Gerald Carr dig in to their Thanksgiving meal aboard the U.S. space station Skylab during the Skylab 4 mission in 1973. It was the first Thanksgiving in space.
NASA's Skylab 4 astronauts Edward Gibson (left) and Gerald Carr dig in to their Thanksgiving meal aboard the U.S. space station Skylab during the Skylab 4 mission in 1973. It was the first Thanksgiving in space.

Nov. 26, 2020: For 20 years, American astronauts have regularly celebrated Thanksgiving off Earth aboard the International Space Station. But it wasn't always so. 

Before the International Space Station (which saw its first crew in 2000), space Thanksgiving were a sporadic affair. The First Space Thanksgiving occurred in 1973, when the three-person crew of Skylab 4 (Gerald Carr, Edward Gibson and William Pogue) visited NASA's Skylab space station. 

Thanksgiving in space 2020: Here's what astronauts will eat in orbit (video)
Related:
How NASA tech helped make your Thanksgiving food safe

This image is a view of that Thanksgiving, with Gibson (left) and Carr tucking in to their holiday meal. They actually skipped lunch due to their busy schedule on that day, but opted to combine two meals for the holiday dinner. Unlike today, the astronauts did not have special Thanksgiving dinner food items.   -- Tariq Malik

Living in space

NASA astronaut Shannon Walker gets to work aboard the International Space Station after launching to the orbiting laboratory last Sunday, Nov. 15, 2020. Walker flew alongside NASA astronauts Victor Glover, Mike Hopkins and JAXA astronaut Soichi Noguchi aboard SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule, named Resilience, as part of the Crew-1 mission.
NASA astronaut Shannon Walker gets to work aboard the International Space Station after launching to the orbiting laboratory last Sunday, Nov. 15, 2020. Walker flew alongside NASA astronauts Victor Glover, Mike Hopkins and JAXA astronaut Soichi Noguchi aboard SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule, named Resilience, as part of the Crew-1 mission.

Nov. 24, 2020: NASA astronaut Shannon Walker gets to work aboard the International Space Station after launching to the orbiting laboratory last Sunday, Nov. 15, 2020. Walker flew alongside NASA astronauts Victor Glover, Mike Hopkins and JAXA astronaut Soichi Noguchi aboard SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule, named Resilience, as part of the Crew-1 mission. 

A space-y cinnamon bun

The faint galaxy UGC 12588 looks kind of like a cosmic cinnamon bun in this image snapped by the Hubble Space Telescope. The spiral galaxy, which appears circular with some white accents (adding to its dessert-like appearance), can be found in the constellation Andromeda.  Now, while UGC 12588 is a spiral galaxy, its "arms" of stars and gas are fairly faint and closely swirled in its center, making it slightly different from a "classic" spiral galaxy.
The faint galaxy UGC 12588 looks kind of like a cosmic cinnamon bun in this image snapped by the Hubble Space Telescope. The spiral galaxy, which appears circular with some white accents (adding to its dessert-like appearance), can be found in the constellation Andromeda. Now, while UGC 12588 is a spiral galaxy, its "arms" of stars and gas are fairly faint and closely swirled in its center, making it slightly different from a "classic" spiral galaxy.

Nov. 23, 2020: The faint galaxy UGC 12588 looks kind of like a cosmic cinnamon bun in this image snapped by the Hubble Space Telescope. The spiral galaxy, which appears circular with some white accents (adding to its dessert-like appearance), can be found in the constellation Andromeda. 

Now, while UGC 12588 is a spiral galaxy, its "arms" of stars and gas are fairly faint and closely swirled in its center, making it slightly different from a "classic" spiral galaxy. 

— Chelsea Gohd

A space amethyst

The planetary nebula IC 4593 shines like a brilliant purple amethyst in space in this view from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory.
The planetary nebula IC 4593 shines like a brilliant purple amethyst in space in this view from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory.

Tuesday, November 18, 2020: The planetary nebula IC 4593 shines like a brilliant purple amethyst in space in this view from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. 

IC 4593 is about 7,800 light-years from Earth and is the farthest planetary nebula that can be seen with Chandra. This view includes some visible-light observations from the Hubble Space Telescope combined with Chandra's X-ray view, according to a NASA image description. The Hubble views are the pink and green hues, while Chandra's X-ray detections show as purple.

Planetary nebulas aren't related to planets at all. They are super-hot bubbles of gas from dying stars that form when the star sheds its outer layers as it contracts. — Tariq Malik

A Dragon flies over Earth

The SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft is pictured approaching the International Space Station for a docking.
The SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft is pictured approaching the International Space Station for a docking.

Tuesday, November 17, 2020: Backdropped by a blanket of clouds, SpaceX's Crew Dragon spacecraft approaches the International Space Station with four Expedition 64 crew members in this view captured from the orbiting laboratory. The spacecraft docked with the space station Monday night at 11:01 p.m. EST (0401 Nov. 17 GMT). — Hanneke Weitering
 

Liftoff!

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying the company's Crew Dragon spacecraft is launched on NASA’s SpaceX Crew-1 mission to the International Space Station with NASA astronauts Mike Hopkins, Victor Glover, Shannon Walker, and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Soichi Noguchi onboard, Sunday, Nov. 15, 2020, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket carrying the company's Crew Dragon spacecraft is launched on NASA’s SpaceX Crew-1 mission to the International Space Station with NASA astronauts Mike Hopkins, Victor Glover, Shannon Walker, and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Soichi Noguchi onboard, Sunday, Nov. 15, 2020, at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Monday, November 16, 2020: A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, with a Crew Dragon spacecraft on top, lifts off from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to deliver four new Expedition 64 crew members to the International Space Station. The Crew-1 mission lifted off from Launch Complex 39A yesterday (Nov. 15) at 7:27 p.m. EDT (0027 GMT on Nov. 16), and it is expected to dock with the International Space Station tonight at 11 p.m. EST (0400 Nov. 17 GMT). — Hanneke Weitering
 

ESO's New Technology Telescope is back in action

The three brightest planets in the night sky flaunt their colorful features in this montage of images captured by the European Southern Observatory's New Technology Telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile. After taking a hiatus during the coronavirus pandemic, the telescope captured these images to test out its instruments before resuming science operations. The relative sizes of the three planets in this montage is proportional to their apparent size in the night sky. Mars appears a bit bigger than usual because the photo was taken around the same time the Red Planet was at opposition, the point in its orbit where it is directly opposite the sun in Earth's sky, in mid-October. The Red Planet was also at its closest point to Earth on Oct. 6, 2020.
The three brightest planets in the night sky flaunt their colorful features in this montage of images captured by the European Southern Observatory's New Technology Telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile. After taking a hiatus during the coronavirus pandemic, the telescope captured these images to test out its instruments before resuming science operations. The relative sizes of the three planets in this montage is proportional to their apparent size in the night sky. Mars appears a bit bigger than usual because the photo was taken around the same time the Red Planet was at opposition, the point in its orbit where it is directly opposite the sun in Earth's sky, in mid-October. The Red Planet was also at its closest point to Earth on Oct. 6, 2020.

Wednesday, November 11, 2020: The three brightest planets in the night sky flaunt their colorful features in this montage of images captured by the European Southern Observatory's New Technology Telescope, located at the La Silla Observatory in Chile. After taking a hiatus during the coronavirus pandemic, the telescope captured these images to test out its instruments before resuming science operations. 

The relative sizes of the three planets in this montage is proportional to their apparent size in the night sky. Mars appears a bit bigger than usual because the photo was taken around the same time the Red Planet was at opposition, the point in its orbit where it is directly opposite the sun in Earth's sky, in mid-October. The Red Planet was also at its closest point to Earth on Oct. 6. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Crew Dragon on the launch pad

The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket with the company’s Crew Dragon spacecraft atop is seen at its launch pad at Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket with the company’s Crew Dragon spacecraft atop is seen at its launch pad at Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Tuesday, November 10, 2020: SpaceX's Crew Dragon spacecraft and Falcon 9 rocket stand ready to launch NASA's Crew-1 mission to the International Space Station. The rocket went vertical on the pad at Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39A in Cape Canaveral, Florida, early this morning after rolling out from the horizontal integration facility overnight. SpaceX is scheduled to launch the Crew-1 mission with NASA astronauts Victor Glover, Mike Hopkins and Shannon Walker and Japan's Soichi Noguchi, on Saturday (Nov. 14). — Hanneke Weitering
 

Space Dragon

SpaceX's Crew-1 Crew Dragon spacecraft will launch the first operational commercial crew flight for NASA on Nov. 14, 2020.
SpaceX's Crew-1 Crew Dragon spacecraft will launch the first operational commercial crew flight for NASA on Nov. 14, 2020.

Monday, November 9, 2020: A new space dragon is born as SpaceX's next Crew Dragon spacecraft to carry astronauts arrives at the Kennedy Space Center's Pad 39A in Cape Canaveral, Florida ahead of a Nov. 14 launch. The spacecraft reached SpaceX's Pad 39A hangar on Nov. 5 after a short trip from its processing facility at the nearby Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. 

The spacecraft will launch four astronauts to the International Space Station for NASA as part of the Crew-1 mission, SpaceX's first operational crewed flight for NASA under the agency's Commercial Crew Program. The Crew-1 astronauts -- NASA's Victor Glover, Mike Hopkins, Shannon Walker and Japan's Soichi Noguchi -- arrived at the launch site on Sunday.

Live updates: SpaceX's Crew-1 astronaut launch for NASA

A ring around the moon

A lunar "halo" glows like an orb in the night sky above the Very Large Telescope in northern Chile, in this photo by European Southern Observatory astronomer Juan Carlos Muñoz-Mateos. This optical phenomenon occurs when moonlight gets refracted by tiny ice crystals and water droplets in the atmosphere.
A lunar "halo" glows like an orb in the night sky above the Very Large Telescope in northern Chile, in this photo by European Southern Observatory astronomer Juan Carlos Muñoz-Mateos. This optical phenomenon occurs when moonlight gets refracted by tiny ice crystals and water droplets in the atmosphere.

Friday, November 6, 2020: A lunar "halo" glows like an orb in the night sky above the Very Large Telescope in northern Chile, in this photo by European Southern Observatory astronomer Juan Carlos Muñoz-Mateos. This optical phenomenon occurs when moonlight gets refracted by tiny ice crystals and water droplets in the atmosphere. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Orion gets dressed for launch

The Orion spacecraft for NASA’s Artemis I mission is in view inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay on Oct. 28. Attached below Orion are the crew module adapter and the European Service Module with spacecraft adapter jettison fairings installed.
The Orion spacecraft for NASA’s Artemis I mission is in view inside the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout Building high bay on Oct. 28. Attached below Orion are the crew module adapter and the European Service Module with spacecraft adapter jettison fairings installed.

Thursday, November 5, 2020: NASA's first Orion spacecraft to visit the moon is gearing up for its historic Artemis 1 launch in 2021. The spacecraft, which consists of a crew capsule built by Lockheed Martin and service module from the European Space Agency, has been wrapped up in its protective three-piece fairing for the upcoming launch.

Artemis 1 will launch the Orion capsule on NASA's first Space Launch System megarocket on a trip around the moon in late 2021. Here's an in depth look at NASA's Artemis program to return humans to the moon by 2024.
 

Atlas V stands ready for launch

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket stands ready to launch the NROL-101 mission for the National Reconnaissance Office, on. The mission is scheduled to lift off from Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida today at 5:54 p.m. EST (2254 GMT), and you can watch the launch live here on Space.com.
A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket stands ready to launch the NROL-101 mission for the National Reconnaissance Office, on. The mission is scheduled to lift off from Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida today at 5:54 p.m. EST (2254 GMT), and you can watch the launch live here on Space.com.

Wednesday, November 4, 2020: A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket stands ready to launch the NROL-101 mission for the National Reconnaissance Office, on. The mission is scheduled to lift off from Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida today at 5:54 p.m. EST (2254 GMT), and you can watch the launch live here on Space.com. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Election 2020 in Space

NASA astronaut Kate Rubins points to a sign on the International Space Station reading "ISS Voting Booth" in a photo she shared while announcing that she had voted from space.
NASA astronaut Kate Rubins points to a sign on the International Space Station reading "ISS Voting Booth" in a photo she shared while announcing that she had voted from space.

Tuesday, November 3, 2020: It's election day on Earth in space, but the only American off Earth right now has already cast her vote in today's 2020 presidential election

We don't know who NASA astronaut Kate Rubins, shown here at her homemade voting booth on the International Space Station, but we do know how. Astronauts in space during an election have been able to vote from orbit since 1997, when NASA and the Texas election officials laid out a cosmic absentee ballot process for any American caught in space on voting day. Rubins, who launched into space on Oct. 14, cast her ballot on Oct. 22 and shared this view of her polling place.  

Hurricane Zeta seen from space

Hurricane Zeta churns in the Gulf of Mexico in this view captured from the International Space Station on Wednesday (Oct. 28), as the Category 2 storm approached Louisiana. In the upper foreground of the image is Russia's Progress 76 cargo resupply spacecraft, which is docked to the Russian Pirs module. At the bottom of the frame is Russia's Soyuz MS-17 spacecraft, which brought three crew members to the space station on Oct. 14.
Hurricane Zeta churns in the Gulf of Mexico in this view captured from the International Space Station on Wednesday (Oct. 28), as the Category 2 storm approached Louisiana. In the upper foreground of the image is Russia's Progress 76 cargo resupply spacecraft, which is docked to the Russian Pirs module. At the bottom of the frame is Russia's Soyuz MS-17 spacecraft, which brought three crew members to the space station on Oct. 14.

Monday, November 2, 2020: Hurricane Zeta churns in the Gulf of Mexico in this view captured from the International Space Station on Wednesday (Oct. 28), as the Category 2 storm approached Louisiana. In the upper foreground of the image is Russia's Progress 76 cargo resupply spacecraft, which is docked to the Russian Pirs module. At the bottom of the frame is Russia's Soyuz MS-17 spacecraft, which brought three crew members to the space station on Oct. 14. — Hanneke Weitering
 

It's the great pumpkin, Hubble!

Just in time for Halloween, the Hubble Space Telescope spotted a "pumpkin patch" made up of two galaxies just starting to collide, spanning 109,000 light-years across. The galaxies, NGC 2292 and NGC 2293, are pumpkin-orange in color because of the aging stars in the galaxies, which appear red.
Just in time for Halloween, the Hubble Space Telescope spotted a "pumpkin patch" made up of two galaxies just starting to collide, spanning 109,000 light-years across. The galaxies, NGC 2292 and NGC 2293, are pumpkin-orange in color because of the aging stars in the galaxies, which appear red.

Oct. 30, 2020: Just in time for Halloween, the Hubble Space Telescope spotted a "pumpkin patch" made up of two galaxies just starting to collide, spanning 109,000 light-years across. The galaxies, NGC 2292 and NGC 2293, are pumpkin-orange in color because of the aging stars in the galaxies, which appear red. 

Exploring at the space station

This photo shows the Canadarm2 robotic arm at the International Space Station which continues to orbit around Earth from 254 miles (409 kilometers) away. The robotic arm, a collaboration with Canada, helps to make repairs on the space station and astronauts have used it complete activities on spacewalks outside of the space station.
This photo shows the Canadarm2 robotic arm at the International Space Station which continues to orbit around Earth from 254 miles (409 kilometers) away. The robotic arm, a collaboration with Canada, helps to make repairs on the space station and astronauts have used it complete activities on spacewalks outside of the space station.

Oct. 29, 2020: This photo shows the Canadarm2 robotic arm at the International Space Station which continues to orbit around Earth from 254 miles (409 kilometers) away. The robotic arm, a collaboration with Canada, helps to make repairs on the space station and astronauts have used it complete activities on spacewalks outside of the space station. 

Kate in space

Expedition 64 NASA astronaut Kate Rubins floats on the International Space Station where she'll be living, working and researching as part of a myriad of science experiments alongside her crewmates. Rubins launched to the space station Oct. 14, 2020 alongside two Russian cosmonauts.
Expedition 64 NASA astronaut Kate Rubins floats on the International Space Station where she'll be living, working and researching as part of a myriad of science experiments alongside her crewmates. Rubins launched to the space station Oct. 14, 2020 alongside two Russian cosmonauts.

Oct. 28, 2020: Expedition 64 NASA astronaut Kate Rubins floats on the International Space Station where she'll be living, working and researching as part of a myriad of science experiments alongside her crewmates. Rubins launched to the space station Oct. 14, 2020 alongside two Russian cosmonauts. 

Orion gets ready

NASA's Orion spacecraft is one more step closer to being completed and launched to the moon. Here, three spacecraft jettison fairings are prepared to be installed and secured around the Orion craft. Orion is set to fly as part of the agency's Artemis program and will fly the first woman and the next man to land on the moon.
NASA's Orion spacecraft is one more step closer to being completed and launched to the moon. Here, three spacecraft jettison fairings are prepared to be installed and secured around the Orion craft. Orion is set to fly as part of the agency's Artemis program and will fly the first woman and the next man to land on the moon.

Oct. 27, 2020: NASA's Orion spacecraft is one more step closer to being completed and launched to the moon. Here, three spacecraft jettison fairings are prepared to be installed and secured around the Orion craft. Orion is set to fly as part of the agency's Artemis program and will fly the first woman and the next man to land on the moon. 

A galactic waterfall

Galaxy NGC 2799 (on the left) and galaxy NGC 2798 (on the right) form a "galactic waterfall," which stands out in this image snapped by the Hubble Space Telescope. These are interacting galaxies, which influence each other and may eventually even merge.
Galaxy NGC 2799 (on the left) and galaxy NGC 2798 (on the right) form a "galactic waterfall," which stands out in this image snapped by the Hubble Space Telescope. These are interacting galaxies, which influence each other and may eventually even merge.

Oct. 26, 2020: Galaxy NGC 2799 (on the left) and galaxy NGC 2798 (on the right) form a "galactic waterfall," which stands out in this image snapped by the Hubble Space Telescope. These are interacting galaxies, which influence each other and may eventually even merge. 

Chris Cassidy returns home

NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy landed back on Earth Oct. 22, 2020 after a stint aboard the International Space Station. Cassidy can be seen here outside the Soyuz MS-16 spacecraft that he and his crewmates, cosmonauts Ivan Vagner and Anatoly Ivanishin, landed in near the town of Zhezkazgan in Kazakhstan.
NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy landed back on Earth Oct. 22, 2020 after a stint aboard the International Space Station. Cassidy can be seen here outside the Soyuz MS-16 spacecraft that he and his crewmates, cosmonauts Ivan Vagner and Anatoly Ivanishin, landed in near the town of Zhezkazgan in Kazakhstan.

Oct. 23, 2020: NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy landed back on Earth Oct. 22, 2020 after a stint aboard the International Space Station. Cassidy can be seen here outside the Soyuz MS-16 spacecraft that he and his crewmates, cosmonauts Ivan Vagner and Anatoly Ivanishin, landed in near the town of Zhezkazgan in Kazakhstan. 

Collecting an asteroid

In this 16-image series, you can see NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft using its 11-foot robotic arm TAGSAM taking a sample from asteroid Bennu on Oct. 20, 2020. The arm's "head" briefly touched down on the asteroid's surface, where it emitted a puff of nitrogen gas. This gas stirred up asteroid material that was then collected into a container in TAGSAM.
In this 16-image series, you can see NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft using its 11-foot robotic arm TAGSAM taking a sample from asteroid Bennu on Oct. 20, 2020. The arm's "head" briefly touched down on the asteroid's surface, where it emitted a puff of nitrogen gas. This gas stirred up asteroid material that was then collected into a container in TAGSAM.

Oct. 22, 2020: In this 16-image series, you can see NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft using its 11-foot robotic arm TAGSAM taking a sample from asteroid Bennu on Oct. 20, 2020. The arm's "head" briefly touched down on the asteroid's surface, where it emitted a puff of nitrogen gas. This gas stirred up asteroid material that was then collected into a container in TAGSAM. 

A free-floating stellar nursery

The Hubble Space Telescope, which celebrated its 30th year of exploration and discovery earlier this year, snapped this image of the star-forming nursery formerly known as J025157.5+600606. This special type of stellar nursery is what's known as a "Free-floating Evaporating Gaseous Globules" or frEGGs.
The Hubble Space Telescope, which celebrated its 30th year of exploration and discovery earlier this year, snapped this image of the star-forming nursery formerly known as J025157.5+600606. This special type of stellar nursery is what's known as a "Free-floating Evaporating Gaseous Globules" or frEGGs.

Oct. 21, 2020: The Hubble Space Telescope, which celebrated its 30th year of exploration and discovery earlier this year, snapped this image of the star-forming nursery formerly known as J025157.5+600606. This special type of stellar nursery is what's known as a "Free-floating Evaporating Gaseous Globules" or frEGGs. 

Juice grows a pair of wings

The ten solar panels for the European Space Agency's Juice (Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer) spacecraft are ready to be turned into solar wings. The panels arrived at Airbus Defense and Space in the Netherlands and, with five solar panels on each side of the spacecraft, the panels will fold up inside the launcher and then eventually deploy like wings for the probe.
The ten solar panels for the European Space Agency's Juice (Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer) spacecraft are ready to be turned into solar wings. The panels arrived at Airbus Defense and Space in the Netherlands and, with five solar panels on each side of the spacecraft, the panels will fold up inside the launcher and then eventually deploy like wings for the probe.

Oct. 20, 2020: The ten solar panels for the European Space Agency's Juice (Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer) spacecraft are ready to be turned into solar wings. The panels arrived at Airbus Defense and Space in the Netherlands and, with five solar panels on each side of the spacecraft, the panels will fold up inside the launcher and then eventually deploy like wings for the probe. 

Stars of Orion twinkle over ALMA

The constellation of Orion, the hunter sparkles above the  Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile's Atacama Desert in this image by European Southern Observatory photo ambassador Yuri Beletsky. Two of the 66 radio telescopes that make up the array are shown in this view. Located on top of the 16,000-foot (5,000 meters) Chajnantor plateau, ALMA's location provides the dark, dry skies that are crucial for observing the cosmos in millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths.
The constellation of Orion, the hunter sparkles above the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile's Atacama Desert in this image by European Southern Observatory photo ambassador Yuri Beletsky. Two of the 66 radio telescopes that make up the array are shown in this view. Located on top of the 16,000-foot (5,000 meters) Chajnantor plateau, ALMA's location provides the dark, dry skies that are crucial for observing the cosmos in millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths.

Monday, October 19, 2020: The constellation of Orion, the hunter sparkles above the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile's Atacama Desert in this image by European Southern Observatory photo ambassador Yuri Beletsky. Two of the 66 radio telescopes that make up ALMA are shown in this view. Located on top of the 16,000-foot (5,000 meters) Chajnantor plateau, ALMA's location provides the dark, dry skies that are crucial for observing the cosmos in millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. — Hanneke Weitering
 

BepiColombo swings by Venus

Yesterday (Oct. 15), the European-Japanese probe BepiColombo swung by Venus, one of its nine gravity assist maneuvers, on its long winding journey to Mercury. At Venus, the craft snapped a number of photos with the cameras aboard its Mercury Transfer Module. The probe is set to eventually arrive in Mercury's orbit in 2025.
Yesterday (Oct. 15), the European-Japanese probe BepiColombo swung by Venus, one of its nine gravity assist maneuvers, on its long winding journey to Mercury. At Venus, the craft snapped a number of photos with the cameras aboard its Mercury Transfer Module. The probe is set to eventually arrive in Mercury's orbit in 2025.

Oct. 16, 2020: Yesterday (Oct. 15), the European-Japanese probe BepiColombo swung by Venus, one of its nine gravity assist maneuvers, on its long winding journey to Mercury. At Venus, the craft snapped a number of photos with the cameras aboard its Mercury Transfer Module. The probe is set to eventually arrive in Mercury's orbit in 2025. 

Thomas Pesquet trains for space

European space agency astronaut Thomas Pesquet trains at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston in preparation for his 2021 mission to the International Space Station. Here he is training for the Time experiment, which was first run in 2017 and which explores the hypothesis that time speeds up in microgravity.
European space agency astronaut Thomas Pesquet trains at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston in preparation for his 2021 mission to the International Space Station. Here he is training for the Time experiment, which was first run in 2017 and which explores the hypothesis that time speeds up in microgravity.

Oct. 15, 2020: European space agency astronaut Thomas Pesquet trains at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston in preparation for his 2021 mission to the International Space Station. Here he is training for the Time experiment, which was first run in 2017 and which explores the hypothesis that time speeds up in microgravity. 

Astronauts blast off to space

This morning at 1:45 am EDT (0545 GMT), NASA astronaut Kate Rubins launched to the International Space Station from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan along with cosmonauts Sergey Ryzhikov and Sergey Kud-Sverchkov. After a speedy arrival at the space station, the trio will begin a six-month stay living and working on the orbiting lab.
This morning at 1:45 am EDT (0545 GMT), NASA astronaut Kate Rubins launched to the International Space Station from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan along with cosmonauts Sergey Ryzhikov and Sergey Kud-Sverchkov. After a speedy arrival at the space station, the trio will begin a six-month stay living and working on the orbiting lab.

Oct. 14, 2020: This morning at 1:45 am EDT (0545 GMT), NASA astronaut Kate Rubins launched to the International Space Station from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan along with cosmonauts Sergey Ryzhikov and Sergey Kud-Sverchkov. After a speedy arrival at the space station, the trio will begin a six-month stay living and working on the orbiting lab. 

The Laguna San Rafael National Park from space

The European Space Agency's Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission spotted the Laguna San Rafael National Park in Chile from space. This orbiting satellite has five instruments onboard that allow it to not only observe Earth below, but also monitor atmospheric conditions like temperature and humidity.
The European Space Agency's Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission spotted the Laguna San Rafael National Park in Chile from space. This orbiting satellite has five instruments onboard that allow it to not only observe Earth below, but also monitor atmospheric conditions like temperature and humidity.

Oct. 13, 2020: The European Space Agency's Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission spotted the Laguna San Rafael National Park in Chile from space. This orbiting satellite has five instruments onboard that allow it to not only observe Earth below, but also monitor atmospheric conditions like temperature and humidity. 

Lost in space: A Mars probe camera

An animated image of the small ejected camera tumbling away from Tianwen-1.
An animated image of the small ejected camera tumbling away from Tianwen-1.

Oct. 12, 2020: A tiny camera tumbles out into deep space after being ejected by China's Tianwen-1 Mars probe 15 million miles from Earth. The image, released Oct. 1, was captured as Tianwen-1 heads to Mars. The camera was able to snap photos of Tianwen-1, which carries a Mars orbiter, lander and rover that are due to arrive at the Red Planet in February 2021. 

Sunset captured from space

NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, who is currently stationed aboard the International Space Station, posted a photo to Twitter that shows what sunset looks like from space. His photo shows the sunset a video camera is capturing as the station's robotic arm maneuvers around the Cygnus spacecraft.
NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, who is currently stationed aboard the International Space Station, posted a photo to Twitter that shows what sunset looks like from space. His photo shows the sunset a video camera is capturing as the station's robotic arm maneuvers around the Cygnus spacecraft.

Oct. 9, 2020: NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy, who is currently stationed aboard the International Space Station, posted a photo to Twitter that shows what sunset looks like from space. His photo shows the sunset a video camera is capturing as the station's robotic arm maneuvers around the Cygnus spacecraft. 

James Webb has passed another test

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope has completed a set of milestone tests, enduring shaking and rattling created to simulate the conditions it will experience when it launches to space. The tests are more formally known as "acoustic" and "sine-vibration" testing, and were completed in two separate facilities at Northrop Grumman’s Space Park in California.
NASA's James Webb Space Telescope has completed a set of milestone tests, enduring shaking and rattling created to simulate the conditions it will experience when it launches to space. The tests are more formally known as "acoustic" and "sine-vibration" testing, and were completed in two separate facilities at Northrop Grumman’s Space Park in California.

Oct. 8, 2020: NASA's James Webb Space Telescope has completed a set of milestone tests, enduring shaking and rattling created to simulate the conditions it will experience when it launches to space. The tests are more formally known as "acoustic" and "sine-vibration" testing, and were completed in two separate facilities at Northrop Grumman’s Space Park in California. 

Expedition 64

The Expedition 64 prime and backup crew members pose together on Oct. 6 before the prime crew launches to the International Space Station on Oct. 14. From left to right are the prime crew NASA astronaut Kate Rubins, Sergey Kud-Sverchkov of Roscosmos and Sergey Ryzhikov of Roscosmos and then the backup crew members Petr Dubov of Roscosmos, Oleg Novitskiy of Roscosmos and NASA astronaut Mark Vande Hei.
The Expedition 64 prime and backup crew members pose together on Oct. 6 before the prime crew launches to the International Space Station on Oct. 14. From left to right are the prime crew NASA astronaut Kate Rubins, Sergey Kud-Sverchkov of Roscosmos and Sergey Ryzhikov of Roscosmos and then the backup crew members Petr Dubov of Roscosmos, Oleg Novitskiy of Roscosmos and NASA astronaut Mark Vande Hei.

Oct. 7, 2020: The Expedition 64 prime and backup crew members pose together on Oct. 6 before the prime crew launches to the International Space Station on Oct. 14. From left to right are the prime crew NASA astronaut Kate Rubins, Sergey Kud-Sverchkov of Roscosmos and Sergey Ryzhikov of Roscosmos and then the backup crew members Petr Dubov of Roscosmos, Oleg Novitskiy of Roscosmos and NASA astronaut Mark Vande Hei.

SpaceX's 13th Starlink batch

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches 60 Starlink internet satellites into space from Pad 39A of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida on Oct. 6, 2020. It was the third flight for the Falcon 9 booster.
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches 60 Starlink internet satellites into space from Pad 39A of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida on Oct. 6, 2020. It was the third flight for the Falcon 9 booster.

Oct. 6, 2020: This morning (Oct. 6), SpaceX launched its 13th batch of Starlink satellites to low-Earth orbit. The 60 satellites launched atop the two-stage Falcon 9 rocket, lifting off from Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. This takeoff followed a two-week launch delay that was caused by bad weather.  Read the full story!

A spiral in Lupus

The spiral galaxy NGC 5643, which rests in the constellation of Lupus (the Wolf) stands out in this image by the Hubble Space Telescope. This galaxy lies about 60 million light-years from Earth and recently was home to the supernova 2017cbv.
The spiral galaxy NGC 5643, which rests in the constellation of Lupus (the Wolf) stands out in this image by the Hubble Space Telescope. This galaxy lies about 60 million light-years from Earth and recently was home to the supernova 2017cbv.

Oct. 2, 2020: The spiral galaxy NGC 5643, which rests in the constellation of Lupus (the Wolf) stands out in this image by the Hubble Space Telescope. This galaxy lies about 60 million light-years from Earth and recently was home to the supernova 2017cbv. 

SpaceX attempts to launch

Twin SpaceX Falcon 9 rockets can be seen in this single shot, taken at Kennedy Space Center before the company's latest Starlink launch attempt Oct. 1, 2020, which was scrubbed. SpaceX continues to launch batches of its Starlink satellites, working to build a constellation of satellites to provide internet service here on Earth.
Twin SpaceX Falcon 9 rockets can be seen in this single shot, taken at Kennedy Space Center before the company's latest Starlink launch attempt Oct. 1, 2020, which was scrubbed. SpaceX continues to launch batches of its Starlink satellites, working to build a constellation of satellites to provide internet service here on Earth.

Oct. 1, 2020: Twin SpaceX Falcon 9 rockets can be seen in this single shot, taken at Kennedy Space Center before the company's latest Starlink launch attempt Oct. 1, 2020, which was scrubbed. SpaceX continues to launch batches of its Starlink satellites, working to build a constellation of satellites to provide internet service here on Earth.

ExoMars moves to France

Last Sunday (Sept. 20), the European Space Agency's ExoMars mission was moved from the Thales Alenia Space facilities to Cannes, France. The mission includes the Rosalind Franklin rover, which has a specialized drill to gather samples from beneath the Martian surface.
Last Sunday (Sept. 20), the European Space Agency's ExoMars mission was moved from the Thales Alenia Space facilities to Cannes, France. The mission includes the Rosalind Franklin rover, which has a specialized drill to gather samples from beneath the Martian surface.

Sept. 30, 2020: Last Sunday (Sept. 20), the European Space Agency's ExoMars mission was moved from the Thales Alenia Space facilities to Cannes, France. The mission includes the Rosalind Franklin rover, which has a specialized drill to gather samples from beneath the Martian surface.  

Expedition 64 prepares for flight

NASA astronaut Kate Rubins and Roscosmos cosmonauts Sergey Kud-Sverchkov and Sergey Ryzhikov are the three astronauts set to launch Oct. 14 to the International Space Station as part of Expedition 64. Here the astronauts can be seen during a fit check inside the Soyuz MS-17 spacecraft at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.
NASA astronaut Kate Rubins and Roscosmos cosmonauts Sergey Kud-Sverchkov and Sergey Ryzhikov are the three astronauts set to launch Oct. 14 to the International Space Station as part of Expedition 64. Here the astronauts can be seen during a fit check inside the Soyuz MS-17 spacecraft at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Sept. 29, 2020: NASA astronaut Kate Rubins and Roscosmos cosmonauts Sergey Kud-Sverchkov and Sergey Ryzhikov are the three astronauts set to launch Oct. 14 to the International Space Station as part of Expedition 64. Here the astronauts can be seen during a fit check inside the Soyuz MS-17 spacecraft at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. 

Dark matter in the Great Bear

On the tail of the Great Bear in the Ursa Major constellation, the spiral galaxy NGC 5585 can be seen here, as imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope. The galaxy is made up of stars, dust and gas clouds and an abundance of dark matter.
On the tail of the Great Bear in the Ursa Major constellation, the spiral galaxy NGC 5585 can be seen here, as imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope. The galaxy is made up of stars, dust and gas clouds and an abundance of dark matter.

Sept. 28, 2020: On the tail of the Great Bear in the Ursa Major constellation, the spiral galaxy NGC 5585 can be seen here, as imaged by the Hubble Space Telescope. The galaxy is made up of stars, dust and gas clouds and an abundance of dark matter. 

Tarawa Atoll from space

The Tarawa Atoll, a remote Pacific nation in the Republic of Kiribati, can be seen from space in this image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission.  Kiribati is an independent island nation spreading out 1351357 square miles (3.5 million square kilometers) of the ocean with a total land area of just 309 sq miles (800 sq km).
The Tarawa Atoll, a remote Pacific nation in the Republic of Kiribati, can be seen from space in this image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission. Kiribati is an independent island nation spreading out 1351357 square miles (3.5 million square kilometers) of the ocean with a total land area of just 309 sq miles (800 sq km).

Sept. 25, 2020: The Tarawa Atoll, a remote Pacific nation in the Republic of Kiribati, can be seen from space in this image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission.  Kiribati is an independent island nation spreading out 1351357 square miles (3.5 million square kilometers) of the ocean with a total land area of just 309 sq miles (800 sq km).  

Orion spacecraft

This is the first Orion spacecraft that will fly to the moon, sitting in the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. This craft will fly as part of NASA'a Artemis program, which aims to return humans to the lunar surface in 2024.
This is the first Orion spacecraft that will fly to the moon, sitting in the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. This craft will fly as part of NASA'a Artemis program, which aims to return humans to the lunar surface in 2024.

Sept. 24, 2020: This is the first Orion spacecraft that will fly to the moon, sitting in the Neil Armstrong Operations and Checkout facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. This craft will fly as part of NASA'a Artemis program, which aims to return humans to the lunar surface in 2024. 

Flowering stellar wind

Stellar winds from the star R Aquilae form a number of shapes, coming together to resemble flower petals. This image was captured by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter array in Chile as part of the ATOMIUM project.
Stellar winds from the star R Aquilae form a number of shapes, coming together to resemble flower petals. This image was captured by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter array in Chile as part of the ATOMIUM project.

Sept. 23, 2020: Stellar winds from the star R Aquilae form a number of shapes, coming together to resemble flower petals. This image was captured by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter array in Chile as part of the ATOMIUM project. 

Enceladus up-close

This global infrared mosaic of Enceladus, one of Saturn's moons, was made using data from the Cassini spacecraft, which orbited Saturn from 2004 to 2017. This image shows five different infrared views of Enceladus, the moon's Saturn-facing side, its trailing side and its North and South pole.
This global infrared mosaic of Enceladus, one of Saturn's moons, was made using data from the Cassini spacecraft, which orbited Saturn from 2004 to 2017. This image shows five different infrared views of Enceladus, the moon's Saturn-facing side, its trailing side and its North and South pole.

Sept. 22, 2020: This global infrared mosaic of Enceladus, one of Saturn's moons, was made using data from the Cassini spacecraft, which orbited Saturn from 2004 to 2017. This image shows five different infrared views of Enceladus, the moon's Saturn-facing side, its trailing side and its North and South pole. 

Guiding light

Unit Telescope 4 of the Very Large Telescope at the European Southern Observatory in Chile fires its "laser guide stars" at the night sky as part of the telescope's adaptive optics system.
Unit Telescope 4 of the Very Large Telescope at the European Southern Observatory in Chile fires its "laser guide stars" at the night sky as part of the telescope's adaptive optics system.

Sept. 20, 2020: The Unit Telescope 4 of the Very Large Telescope at the European Southern Observatory in Chile fires its "laser guide stars" at the night sky as part of the telescope's adaptive optics system.

Unit 4 is one of four separate 8.2-meter telescopes that make up the Very Large Telescope, which in turn is part of the European Southern Observatory high up in Chile's Atacama Desert. The telescope's adaptive optics system users powerful lasers as guide stars to help its adaptive optics system correct for the distortion of the Earth's atmosphere in astronomical observations.

Jupiter's striking storms

This new, stunning image of Jupiter, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, was captured on Aug. 25, 2020 and shows the planet's turbulent, swirling storms. In the photo, you can see the ripples in the planet's atmosphere, Jupiter's famous Great Red Spot and the planet's striking colors.
This new, stunning image of Jupiter, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, was captured on Aug. 25, 2020 and shows the planet's turbulent, swirling storms. In the photo, you can see the ripples in the planet's atmosphere, Jupiter's famous Great Red Spot and the planet's striking colors.

Sept. 18, 2020: This new, stunning image of Jupiter, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope, was captured on Aug. 25, 2020 and shows the planet's turbulent, swirling storms. In the photo, you can see the ripples in the planet's atmosphere, Jupiter's famous Great Red Spot and the planet's striking colors. 

Reflecting radio beams

This metal-mesh antenna reflector was created as part of the European Space Agency's AMPER (Advanced techniques for mesh reflector with improved radiation pattern performance) project. Researchers are developing this mesh reflector technology to advance the performance and capabilities of large antennas.
This metal-mesh antenna reflector was created as part of the European Space Agency's AMPER (Advanced techniques for mesh reflector with improved radiation pattern performance) project. Researchers are developing this mesh reflector technology to advance the performance and capabilities of large antennas.

Sept. 17, 2020: This metal-mesh antenna reflector was created as part of the European Space Agency's AMPER (Advanced techniques for mesh reflector with improved radiation pattern performance) project. Researchers are developing this mesh reflector technology to advance the performance and capabilities of large antennas. 

The Amazon river from space

The Copernicus Sentinel-1 satellite captured this image of the Amazon River snaking its way through the Amazon rainforest in South America from space. The colors in this image come from two polarizations from the Copernicus Sentinel-1 radar mission which have been merged into one image.
The Copernicus Sentinel-1 satellite captured this image of the Amazon River snaking its way through the Amazon rainforest in South America from space. The colors in this image come from two polarizations from the Copernicus Sentinel-1 radar mission which have been merged into one image.

Sept. 16, 2020: The Copernicus Sentinel-1 satellite captured this image of the Amazon River snaking its way through the Amazon rainforest in South America from space. The colors in this image come from two polarizations from the Copernicus Sentinel-1 radar mission which have been merged into one image.

West coast wildfires

The massive amount of smoke billowing out from California in the U.S. can be seen from space, as you can see in this image taken Sept. 10 by the Copernicus Sentinel-3 satellite. There are as many as 100 wildfires currently raging in California and they have additionally spread into Washington and Oregon.
The massive amount of smoke billowing out from California in the U.S. can be seen from space, as you can see in this image taken Sept. 10 by the Copernicus Sentinel-3 satellite. There are as many as 100 wildfires currently raging in California and they have additionally spread into Washington and Oregon.

Sept. 15, 2020: The massive amount of smoke billowing out from California in the U.S. can be seen from space, as you can see in this image taken Sept. 10 by the Copernicus Sentinel-3 satellite. There are as many as 100 wildfires currently raging in California and they have additionally spread into Washington and Oregon.

A serpent's eye

The spiral galaxy NGC 2835 sparkles out in the head of the constellation Hydra, as seen in this photo taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. The galaxy is is about half as wide as the Milky Way and has a supermassive black hole millions of times more massive than our sun at its center.
The spiral galaxy NGC 2835 sparkles out in the head of the constellation Hydra, as seen in this photo taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. The galaxy is is about half as wide as the Milky Way and has a supermassive black hole millions of times more massive than our sun at its center.

Sept. 14, 2020: The spiral galaxy NGC 2835 sparkles out in the head of the constellation Hydra, as seen in this photo taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. The galaxy is is about half as wide as the Milky Way and has a supermassive black hole millions of times more massive than our sun at its center. 

Galactic fireworks

These "galactic fireworks" are the colorful stars which make up the globular cluster NGC 1805, as seen in this photo taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. This cluster of thousands of stars is located out at the edge of the large Magellanic Cloud.
These "galactic fireworks" are the colorful stars which make up the globular cluster NGC 1805, as seen in this photo taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. This cluster of thousands of stars is located out at the edge of the large Magellanic Cloud.

Sept. 11, 2020: These "galactic fireworks" are the colorful stars which make up the globular cluster NGC 1805, as seen in this photo taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. This cluster of thousands of stars is located out at the edge of the large Magellanic Cloud. 

A spacecraft's backbone

This structure is the skeleton, or the frame and base, for the European Service Module that will be part of NASA's Orion spacecraft, which, as part of the agency's Artemis program, will return humans to the moon. This "backbone" for the Orion spacecraft was built in Turin, Italy at Thales Alenia Space.
This structure is the skeleton, or the frame and base, for the European Service Module that will be part of NASA's Orion spacecraft, which, as part of the agency's Artemis program, will return humans to the moon. This "backbone" for the Orion spacecraft was built in Turin, Italy at Thales Alenia Space.

Sept. 10, 2020: This structure is the skeleton, or the frame and base, for the European Service Module that will be part of NASA's Orion spacecraft, which, as part of the agency's Artemis program, will return humans to the moon. This "backbone" for the Orion spacecraft was built in Turin, Italy at Thales Alenia Space. 

Typhoon Haishen

NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy took this photograph of Typhoon Haishen from aboard the International Space Station. The typhoon has led to seven million people being ordered to evacuate and, after hitting Japan it reached the Korean peninsula.
NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy took this photograph of Typhoon Haishen from aboard the International Space Station. The typhoon has led to seven million people being ordered to evacuate and, after hitting Japan it reached the Korean peninsula.

Sept. 9, 2020: NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy took this photograph of Typhoon Haishen from aboard the International Space Station. The typhoon has led to seven million people being ordered to evacuate and, after hitting Japan it reached the Korean peninsula. 

A tilted galaxy

The Hubble Space Telescope spied the blue and orange stars of the faint, tilted galaxy NGC 2188, which is estimated to stretch about 50,000 light-years across. The galaxy, thought to be about half the size of the Milky Way, sits in the constellation Columba (the Dove).
The Hubble Space Telescope spied the blue and orange stars of the faint, tilted galaxy NGC 2188, which is estimated to stretch about 50,000 light-years across. The galaxy, thought to be about half the size of the Milky Way, sits in the constellation Columba (the Dove).

Sept. 8, 2020: The Hubble Space Telescope spied the blue and orange stars of the faint, tilted galaxy NGC 2188, which is estimated to stretch about 50,000 light-years across. The galaxy, thought to be about half the size of the Milky Way, sits in the constellation Columba (the Dove). 

Earth from space

This image shows the Gulf of Kutch, also known as the Gulf of Kachchh, an inlet of the Arabian Sea along India's west coast. The photo was snapped by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission, which is made up of two satellites. Each satellite of the mission has a high-resolution camera on board to allow the satellites to track changes in bodies of water on Earth.
This image shows the Gulf of Kutch, also known as the Gulf of Kachchh, an inlet of the Arabian Sea along India's west coast. The photo was snapped by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission, which is made up of two satellites. Each satellite of the mission has a high-resolution camera on board to allow the satellites to track changes in bodies of water on Earth.

Sept. 4, 2020: This image shows the Gulf of Kutch, also known as the Gulf of Kachchh, an inlet of the Arabian Sea along India's west coast. The photo was snapped by the Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission, which is made up of two satellites. Each satellite of the mission has a high-resolution camera on board to allow the satellites to track changes in bodies of water on Earth. 

The Nereidum Mountain Range

This color-coded topographic view shows the Nereidum Mountain range, which lies on the surface of Mars in the planet's southern hemisphere. The image shows a region within the mountain range which is a part of the large Argyre impact basin, one of the biggest impact structures on the entire Red Planet.
This color-coded topographic view shows the Nereidum Mountain range, which lies on the surface of Mars in the planet's southern hemisphere. The image shows a region within the mountain range which is a part of the large Argyre impact basin, one of the biggest impact structures on the entire Red Planet.

Sept. 3, 2020: This color-coded topographic view shows the Nereidum Mountain range, which lies on the surface of Mars in the planet's southern hemisphere. The image shows a region within the mountain range which is a part of the large Argyre impact basin, one of the biggest impact structures on the entire Red Planet. 

Plasma propulsion

The Helicon Plasma Thruster, developed by the European Space Agency by SENER in Spain, completes a test firing in this image. The thruster, which uses high power radio frequency waves to turn propellant into a plasma, is designed to propel small satellites and maintain large megaconstellations of satellites.
The Helicon Plasma Thruster, developed by the European Space Agency by SENER in Spain, completes a test firing in this image. The thruster, which uses high power radio frequency waves to turn propellant into a plasma, is designed to propel small satellites and maintain large megaconstellations of satellites.

Sept. 2, 2020: The Helicon Plasma Thruster, developed by the European Space Agency by SENER in Spain, completes a test firing in this image. The thruster, which uses high power radio frequency waves to turn propellant into a plasma, is designed to propel small satellites and maintain large megaconstellations of satellites. 

Riding a blast wave

This brilliant streak of light is a small section of the Cygnus supernova blast wave, as spotted by the Hubble Space Telescope. The blast, which is about 2,400 light-years away, was from a supernova explosion that tore apart a dying star 20 times more massive than our sun between 10,000 and 20,000 years ago.
This brilliant streak of light is a small section of the Cygnus supernova blast wave, as spotted by the Hubble Space Telescope. The blast, which is about 2,400 light-years away, was from a supernova explosion that tore apart a dying star 20 times more massive than our sun between 10,000 and 20,000 years ago.

Sept. 1, 2020: This brilliant streak of light is a small section of the Cygnus supernova blast wave, as spotted by the Hubble Space Telescope. The blast, which is about 2,400 light-years away, was from a supernova explosion that tore apart a dying star 20 times more massive than our sun between 10,000 and 20,000 years ago. 

SpaceX nails another launch and landing

Saturday (Aug. 30, 2020), SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket blasted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, carrying the SAOCOM 1B Earth-observation radar satellite for Argentina and two small rideshare payloads. This was SpaceX's 15th launch of the year, successfully lifting off at 7:18 p.m. EDT (2318 GMT). Soon after launch, the booster's first stage landed perfectly back on Earth.
Saturday (Aug. 30, 2020), SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket blasted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, carrying the SAOCOM 1B Earth-observation radar satellite for Argentina and two small rideshare payloads. This was SpaceX's 15th launch of the year, successfully lifting off at 7:18 p.m. EDT (2318 GMT). Soon after launch, the booster's first stage landed perfectly back on Earth.

Aug. 31, 2020: Saturday (Aug. 30, 2020), SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket blasted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, carrying the SAOCOM 1B Earth-observation radar satellite for Argentina and two small rideshare payloads. This was SpaceX's 15th launch of the year, successfully lifting off at 7:18 p.m. EDT (2318 GMT). Soon after launch, the booster's first stage landed perfectly back on Earth. 

Galactic tails

In this image, which combines data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys (which is installed on the Hubble Space Telescope) and the Subaru Telescope in Hawaii, you can see a cosmic tail emerging from the spiral galaxy D100.
In this image, which combines data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys (which is installed on the Hubble Space Telescope) and the Subaru Telescope in Hawaii, you can see a cosmic tail emerging from the spiral galaxy D100.

Aug. 28, 2020: In this image, which combines data from the Advanced Camera for Surveys (which is installed on the Hubble Space Telescope) and the Subaru Telescope in Hawaii, you can see a cosmic tail emerging from the spiral galaxy D100. 

A spectacular, diffuse nebula

This image, snapped by the Hubble Space Telescope, shows the enormous, fluffy-looking nebula NGC 595. The nebula, located about three million light-years away from Earth in the Triangulum Galaxy, is made up of ionised hydrogen.
This image, snapped by the Hubble Space Telescope, shows the enormous, fluffy-looking nebula NGC 595. The nebula, located about three million light-years away from Earth in the Triangulum Galaxy, is made up of ionised hydrogen.

Aug. 27, 2020: This image, snapped by the Hubble Space Telescope, shows the enormous, fluffy-looking nebula NGC 595. The nebula, located about three million light-years away from Earth in the Triangulum Galaxy, is made up of ionised hydrogen.  

Hurricane Laura from space

NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy captured this photo of Hurricane Laura in the Gulf of Mexico from his window on the International Space Station on Aug. 25, 2020.
NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy captured this photo of Hurricane Laura in the Gulf of Mexico from his window on the International Space Station on Aug. 25, 2020.

Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2020:  Hurricane Laura looks fearsome in the Gulf of Mexico from orbit in this view from the International Space Station by NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy. 

Cassidy captured this view on Aug. 25 as Laura reached hurricane status while making its way toward the U.S. Gulf Coast. The storm is expected to make landfall Thursday, Aug. 27, as a powerful Category 3 storm. -- Tariq Malik

The Barred Method

The double-barred spiral galaxy NGC 1365 is seen by the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory in Chile. It's known as the Great Barred Spiral Galaxy.
The double-barred spiral galaxy NGC 1365 is seen by the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory in Chile. It's known as the Great Barred Spiral Galaxy.

Monday, Aug. 24, 2020: The double-barred spiral galaxy NGC 1365 is seen by the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory in Chile. It's known as the Great Barred Spiral Galaxy.

NGC 1635 is located 56 million light-years away in the Fornax galaxy cluster. Its twin bar structure is rare, according to ESO, and is thought to be caused by both the galaxy's rotation and the intricate dynamics of its stars. -- Tariq Malik

Out-of-this-world fireworks

The Hubble Space Telescope captured a spectacular, cosmic fireworks show in this image of the galaxy NGC 2442, nicknamed the Meathook Galaxy because of its unusual shape. This galaxy held the white dwarf star supernova SN2015F, which was first discovered in March 2015.
The Hubble Space Telescope captured a spectacular, cosmic fireworks show in this image of the galaxy NGC 2442, nicknamed the Meathook Galaxy because of its unusual shape. This galaxy held the white dwarf star supernova SN2015F, which was first discovered in March 2015.

Aug. 21, 2020: The Hubble Space Telescope captured a spectacular, cosmic fireworks show in this image of the galaxy NGC 2442, nicknamed the Meathook Galaxy because of its unusual shape. This galaxy held the white dwarf star supernova SN2015F, which was first discovered in March 2015. 

Hurricane Genevieve

NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy shared this photo of Hurricane Genevieve snapped from the International Space Station. The storm, which is enormous and swirling on in the Pacific Ocean, has grown into a Category 4 hurricane.
NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy shared this photo of Hurricane Genevieve snapped from the International Space Station. The storm, which is enormous and swirling on in the Pacific Ocean, has grown into a Category 4 hurricane.

Aug. 20, 2020: NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy shared this photo of Hurricane Genevieve snapped from the International Space Station. The storm, which is enormous and swirling on in the Pacific Ocean, has grown into a Category 4 hurricane. 

A spectacular galactic cluster

This image of the galaxy cluster Abell 2597 was spotted by NASA's Chandra X-ray observatory. In the image, you can see a cloud of hot gas with two dark "ghost cavities" resting about 100,000 light-years from its bright center. The ghost cavities are thought to be the ancient relics of an eruption from around a black hole.
This image of the galaxy cluster Abell 2597 was spotted by NASA's Chandra X-ray observatory. In the image, you can see a cloud of hot gas with two dark "ghost cavities" resting about 100,000 light-years from its bright center. The ghost cavities are thought to be the ancient relics of an eruption from around a black hole.

Aug. 19, 2020: This image of the galaxy cluster Abell 2597 was spotted by NASA's Chandra X-ray observatory. In the image, you can see a cloud of hot gas with two dark "ghost cavities" resting about 100,000 light-years from its bright center. The ghost cavities are thought to be the ancient relics of an eruption from around a black hole. 

Crew-1 ready to roll

SpaceX's Crew-1 mission, its first fully crewed, fully operational Crew Dragon mission to the International Space Station, is gearing up to launch no sooner than Oct. 23, 2020. This is the SpaceX Crew-1 official crew portrait with the full mission crew. From the left you can see NASA astronauts Shannon Walker, Victor Glover, Mike Hopkins and JAXA astronaut Soichi Noguchi.
SpaceX's Crew-1 mission, its first fully crewed, fully operational Crew Dragon mission to the International Space Station, is gearing up to launch no sooner than Oct. 23, 2020. This is the SpaceX Crew-1 official crew portrait with the full mission crew. From the left you can see NASA astronauts Shannon Walker, Victor Glover, Mike Hopkins and JAXA astronaut Soichi Noguchi.

Aug. 18, 2020: SpaceX's Crew-1 mission, its first fully crewed, fully operational Crew Dragon mission to the International Space Station, is gearing up to launch no sooner than Oct. 23, 2020. This is the SpaceX Crew-1 official crew portrait with the full mission crew. From the left you can see NASA astronauts Shannon Walker, Victor Glover, Mike Hopkins and JAXA astronaut Soichi Noguchi.

A sparkling star cluster

The Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 snapped this image of the globular star cluster 47 Tucanae. In this image there are about 35,000 stars near the cluster's center. In this picture you can see the natural colors of the stars, which allow scientists to determine things like how old the stars might be and what they could be made out of.
The Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 snapped this image of the globular star cluster 47 Tucanae. In this image there are about 35,000 stars near the cluster's center. In this picture you can see the natural colors of the stars, which allow scientists to determine things like how old the stars might be and what they could be made out of.

Aug. 17, 2020: The Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 snapped this image of the globular star cluster 47 Tucanae. In this image there are about 35,000 stars near the cluster's center. In this picture you can see the natural colors of the stars, which allow scientists to determine things like how old the stars might be and what they could be made out of. 

Saluting the sun

After four months of total darkness, on Aug. 11, the sun finally rose at the Concordia research station in Antarctica. Here, you can see ESA-sponsored medical doctor Stijn Thoolen (left) and engineer Wenceslas Marie-Sainte (right) celebrating the sunrise. The pair are part of a 12-member crew spending a year working, living and researching at the station.
After four months of total darkness, on Aug. 11, the sun finally rose at the Concordia research station in Antarctica. Here, you can see ESA-sponsored medical doctor Stijn Thoolen (left) and engineer Wenceslas Marie-Sainte (right) celebrating the sunrise. The pair are part of a 12-member crew spending a year working, living and researching at the station.

Aug. 14, 2020: After four months of total darkness, on Aug. 11, the sun finally rose at the Concordia research station in Antarctica. Here, you can see ESA-sponsored medical doctor Stijn Thoolen (left) and engineer Wenceslas Marie-Sainte (right) celebrating the sunrise. The pair are part of a 12-member crew spending a year working, living and researching at the station. 

Crew-1 prepares

The astronauts who will fly as part of SpaceX's Crew-1 mission, Crew Dragon commander NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, pilot and NASA astronaut Victor Glover and mission specialist, fellow NASA astronaut Shannon Walker and mission specialist and JAXA astronaut Soichi Noguchi. The four will launch with this mission aboard SpaceX's Crew Dragon vehicle to the International Space Station.
The astronauts who will fly as part of SpaceX's Crew-1 mission, Crew Dragon commander NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, pilot and NASA astronaut Victor Glover and mission specialist, fellow NASA astronaut Shannon Walker and mission specialist and JAXA astronaut Soichi Noguchi. The four will launch with this mission aboard SpaceX's Crew Dragon vehicle to the International Space Station.

Aug. 13, 2020: The astronauts who will fly as part of SpaceX's Crew-1 mission, Crew Dragon commander NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins, pilot and NASA astronaut Victor Glover and mission specialist, fellow NASA astronaut Shannon Walker and mission specialist and JAXA astronaut Soichi Noguchi. The four will launch with this mission aboard SpaceX's Crew Dragon vehicle to the International Space Station. 

Mauritius oil spill

The Copernicus Sentinel-2 captured this image on Aug. 11 of the island of Mauritius, which has declared a "state of environmental emergency" following an oil spill, from space. In the image, you can see the vessel MV Wakashio, which was reported to be carrying about 4,000 tons of oil, stranded near an important wetland area.
The Copernicus Sentinel-2 captured this image on Aug. 11 of the island of Mauritius, which has declared a "state of environmental emergency" following an oil spill, from space. In the image, you can see the vessel MV Wakashio, which was reported to be carrying about 4,000 tons of oil, stranded near an important wetland area.

Aug. 12, 2020: The Copernicus Sentinel-2 captured this image on Aug. 11 of the island of Mauritius, which has declared a "state of environmental emergency" following an oil spill, from space. In the image, you can see the vessel MV Wakashio, which was reported to be carrying about 4,000 tons of oil, stranded near an important wetland area. 

Galapa-gorgeous

Aug. 11, 2020: NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy snapped this breathtaking shot of the Galapagos Islands from his current post aboard the International Space Station. Cassidy recently bade farewell to fellow astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley who successfully and safely made their way back to Earth and, in doing so, completed the SpaceX Demo-2 mission.
Aug. 11, 2020: NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy snapped this breathtaking shot of the Galapagos Islands from his current post aboard the International Space Station. Cassidy recently bade farewell to fellow astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley who successfully and safely made their way back to Earth and, in doing so, completed the SpaceX Demo-2 mission.

Aug. 11, 2020: NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy snapped this breathtaking shot of the Galapagos Islands from his current post aboard the International Space Station. Cassidy recently bade farewell to fellow astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley who successfully and safely made their way back to Earth and, in doing so, completed the SpaceX Demo-2 mission.

Red sky observatory

The setting sun created an array of colorful clouds above the European Southern Observatory's Paranal Observatory in the Atacama Desert in Chile, which is home to the Very Large Telescope. In addition to the beautifully hued clouds, you might be able to spot a "sun pillar" in the upper left of this image. A sun pillar is a bright column of light created when tiny particles of ice in the atmosphere reflect ambient light.
The setting sun created an array of colorful clouds above the European Southern Observatory's Paranal Observatory in the Atacama Desert in Chile, which is home to the Very Large Telescope. In addition to the beautifully hued clouds, you might be able to spot a "sun pillar" in the upper left of this image. A sun pillar is a bright column of light created when tiny particles of ice in the atmosphere reflect ambient light.

Aug. 10, 2020: The setting sun created an array of colorful clouds above the European Southern Observatory's Paranal Observatory in the Atacama Desert in Chile, which is home to the Very Large Telescope. In addition to the beautifully hued clouds, you might be able to spot a "sun pillar" in the upper left of this image. A sun pillar is a bright column of light created when tiny particles of ice in the atmosphere reflect ambient light. 

Saturn in striking detail

This image of Saturn, snapped by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, reveals the planet's swirling, turbulent atmosphere and striking, signature rings. You can even see the planet's mysterious "hexagon," the hexagonal storm constantly swirling at its north pole, right on "top" of the planet.
This image of Saturn, snapped by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, reveals the planet's swirling, turbulent atmosphere and striking, signature rings. You can even see the planet's mysterious "hexagon," the hexagonal storm constantly swirling at its north pole, right on "top" of the planet.

Aug. 7, 2020: This image of Saturn, snapped by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, reveals the planet's swirling, turbulent atmosphere and striking, signature rings. You can even see the planet's mysterious "hexagon," the hexagonal storm constantly swirling at its north pole, right on "top" of the planet. 

A successful splashdown

On Sunday (Aug. 2), NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley splashed back down on Earth inside of a SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule, successfully completing the SpaceX Demo-2 mission to and from the International Space Station. This was the first splashdown landing for the U.S. in roughly 45 years.
On Sunday (Aug. 2), NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley splashed back down on Earth inside of a SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule, successfully completing the SpaceX Demo-2 mission to and from the International Space Station. This was the first splashdown landing for the U.S. in roughly 45 years.

Aug. 6, 2020: On Sunday (Aug. 2), NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley splashed back down on Earth inside of a SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule, successfully completing the SpaceX Demo-2 mission to and from the International Space Station. This was the first splashdown landing for the U.S. in roughly 45 years. 

A space butterfly

This stunning image, taken by ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT), shows the "space butterfly," the planetary nebula NGC 2899. The nebula's gases, forming the shape of a cosmic butterfly, stretch out to a maximum of two light-years from its center. The striking structure glows brightly in the Milky Way galaxy.
This stunning image, taken by ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT), shows the "space butterfly," the planetary nebula NGC 2899. The nebula's gases, forming the shape of a cosmic butterfly, stretch out to a maximum of two light-years from its center. The striking structure glows brightly in the Milky Way galaxy.

Aug. 5, 2020: This stunning image, taken by ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT), shows the "space butterfly," the planetary nebula NGC 2899. The nebula's gases, forming the shape of a cosmic butterfly, stretch out to a maximum of two light-years from its center. The striking structure glows brightly in the Milky Way galaxy. 

Bringing a Dragon home

NASA astronauts BoB Behnken (left) and Doug Hurley are seen inside the SpaceX Crew Dragon Endeavour spacecraft onboard the GO Navigator recovery ship shortly after having landed in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Pensacola, Florida on Aug. 2, 2020. 
NASA astronauts BoB Behnken (left) and Doug Hurley are seen inside the SpaceX Crew Dragon Endeavour spacecraft onboard the GO Navigator recovery ship shortly after having landed in the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Pensacola, Florida on Aug. 2, 2020.

August 3, 2020: Yesterday (Aug. 2), NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley made their way home to Earth aboard the SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft Endeavour which they rode to space on May 30. With the successful splashdown, SpaceX's Demo-2 mission is complete and the company will move on to its first operational crewed Crew Dragon mission, Crew-1. 

Training for the Dragon

NASA astronauts Megan McArthur and Shane Kimbrough can be seen in this image, which McArthur shared to Twitter, at SpaceX, practicing how to fly the company's Crew Dragon vehicle. The pair will make up half of the crew that will fly to the space station with SpaceX's Crew-2 mission, slated for 2021.
NASA astronauts Megan McArthur and Shane Kimbrough can be seen in this image, which McArthur shared to Twitter, at SpaceX, practicing how to fly the company's Crew Dragon vehicle. The pair will make up half of the crew that will fly to the space station with SpaceX's Crew-2 mission, slated for 2021.

July 31, 2020: NASA astronauts Megan McArthur and Shane Kimbrough can be seen in this image, which McArthur shared to Twitter, at SpaceX, practicing how to fly the company's Crew Dragon vehicle. The pair will make up half of the crew that will fly to the space station with SpaceX's Crew-2 mission, slated for 2021. 

To Mars!

Today, NASA's Mars 2020 Perseverance rover successfully launched from Florida aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. The mission has been smoothly continuing as it begins a seven-month journey to Mars' Jezero Crater, where it is set to land Feb. 18, 2021.
Today, NASA's Mars 2020 Perseverance rover successfully launched from Florida aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. The mission has been smoothly continuing as it begins a seven-month journey to Mars' Jezero Crater, where it is set to land Feb. 18, 2021.

July 30, 2020: Today, NASA's Mars 2020 Perseverance rover successfully launched from Florida aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. The mission has been smoothly continuing as it begins a seven-month journey to Mars' Jezero Crater, where it is set to land Feb. 18, 2021. 

Training for space

ESA astronauts Matthias Maurer and Thomas Pesquet are at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas to train for missions to the International Space Station. Pesquet is set to join the crew for SpaceX's Crew-2 mission which will be the second fully operational, crewed mission with the company's Crew Dragon vehicle. Matthias is training for his first flight to the space station. The details about this mission, however, have yet to be released.
ESA astronauts Matthias Maurer and Thomas Pesquet are at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas to train for missions to the International Space Station. Pesquet is set to join the crew for SpaceX's Crew-2 mission which will be the second fully operational, crewed mission with the company's Crew Dragon vehicle. Matthias is training for his first flight to the space station. The details about this mission, however, have yet to be released.

July 29, 2020: ESA astronauts Matthias Maurer and Thomas Pesquet are at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas to train for missions to the International Space Station. Pesquet is set to join the crew for SpaceX's Crew-2 mission which will be the second fully operational, crewed mission with the company's Crew Dragon vehicle. Matthias is training for his first flight to the space station. The details about this mission, however, have yet to be released. 

Dazzling stars

The star cluster NGC 2203 dazzles here in an image by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The cluster contains a number of interesting features including stars about twice as massive as our sun. In studying this cluster, astronomers hope to better understand the timeline and lives of stars.
The star cluster NGC 2203 dazzles here in an image by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The cluster contains a number of interesting features including stars about twice as massive as our sun. In studying this cluster, astronomers hope to better understand the timeline and lives of stars.

July 28, 2020: The star cluster NGC 2203 dazzles here in an image by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The cluster contains a number of interesting features including stars about twice as massive as our sun. In studying this cluster, astronomers hope to better understand the timeline and lives of stars. 

Swirling storms

NASA astronaut Bob Behnken snapped this incredible photo of Hurricane Hanna (now classified as a tropical storm) from the International Space Station this past Friday (July 24.) "Snapped this photo of the storm in the Gulf of Mexico on Friday as it was starting to have observable structure from @Space_Station. #HurricaneHanna," Behnken wrote on Twitter.
NASA astronaut Bob Behnken snapped this incredible photo of Hurricane Hanna (now classified as a tropical storm) from the International Space Station this past Friday (July 24.) "Snapped this photo of the storm in the Gulf of Mexico on Friday as it was starting to have observable structure from @Space_Station. #HurricaneHanna," Behnken wrote on Twitter.

July 27: NASA astronaut Bob Behnken snapped this incredible photo of Hurricane Hanna (now classified as a tropical storm) from the International Space Station this past Friday (July 24.)

"Snapped this photo of the storm in the Gulf of Mexico on Friday as it was starting to have observable structure from @Space_Station. #HurricaneHanna," Behnken wrote on Twitter

A comet and a space station

This striking photo showcases both comet NEOWISE and the International Space Station. This 10-second exposure image shows the space station's movement as a straight, yellow line and the comet as a diffuse, glowing object seemingly falling from the sky. Comet NEOWISE made its closest approach to Earth yesterday (July 23).
This striking photo showcases both comet NEOWISE and the International Space Station. This 10-second exposure image shows the space station's movement as a straight, yellow line and the comet as a diffuse, glowing object seemingly falling from the sky. Comet NEOWISE made its closest approach to Earth yesterday (July 23).

July 24, 2020:  This striking photo showcases both comet NEOWISE and the International Space Station. This 10-second exposure image shows the space station's movement as a straight, yellow line and the comet as a diffuse, glowing object seemingly falling from the sky. Comet NEOWISE made its closest approach to Earth yesterday (July 23). 

Rosalind Franklin gets ready for Mars

 Today, the European Space Agency, along with a number of partners, will analyze how ready Rosalind Franklin, the ExoMars robotic craft named after the groundbreaking chemist who discovered the double helix structure of DNA,  is for a trip to Mars set for 2022.
Today, the European Space Agency, along with a number of partners, will analyze how ready Rosalind Franklin, the ExoMars robotic craft named after the groundbreaking chemist who discovered the double helix structure of DNA, is for a trip to Mars set for 2022.

July 23, 2020: Today, the European Space Agency, along with a number of partners, will analyze how ready Rosalind Franklin, the ExoMars robotic craft named after the groundbreaking chemist who discovered the double helix structure of DNA,  is for a trip to Mars set for 2022. 

Earth from above

NASA astronaut Doug Hurley snapped this incredible shot of the Sobradinho Reservoir and São Francisco River in Brazil from the International Space Station and posted it to Twitter on July 21. Hurley flew to the space station May 30 aboard SpaceX's Crew Dragon vehicle Endeavour as part of the Demo-2 mission and is set to return to Earth on August 2.
NASA astronaut Doug Hurley snapped this incredible shot of the Sobradinho Reservoir and São Francisco River in Brazil from the International Space Station and posted it to Twitter on July 21. Hurley flew to the space station May 30 aboard SpaceX's Crew Dragon vehicle Endeavour as part of the Demo-2 mission and is set to return to Earth on August 2.

July 22, 2020: NASA astronaut Doug Hurley snapped this incredible shot of the Sobradinho Reservoir and São Francisco River in Brazil from the International Space Station and posted it to Twitter on July 21. Hurley flew to the space station May 30 aboard SpaceX's Crew Dragon vehicle Endeavour as part of the Demo-2 mission and is set to return to Earth on August 2. 

A supernova remnant

While it might look like a cosmic, space brain, this is actually an image of G292.0+1.8, a young, oxygen-rich remnant from a supernova that scientists think has a pulsar at its center, surrounded by outflowing material. The image, taken by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory   Observations using Chandra have created strong evidence that there is a pulsar in G292.0+1.8. Using observations like this, astronomers can study the connection between pulsars (a magnetized, rotating neutron star that emits electromagnetic radiation) and massive stars.   In this image, you can see a shell of expanding gas 36 light-years across. The gas contains elements including oxygen, neon, magnesium, silicon and sulfur.
While it might look like a cosmic, space brain, this is actually an image of G292.0+1.8, a young, oxygen-rich remnant from a supernova that scientists think has a pulsar at its center, surrounded by outflowing material. The image, taken by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory Observations using Chandra have created strong evidence that there is a pulsar in G292.0+1.8. Using observations like this, astronomers can study the connection between pulsars (a magnetized, rotating neutron star that emits electromagnetic radiation) and massive stars. In this image, you can see a shell of expanding gas 36 light-years across. The gas contains elements including oxygen, neon, magnesium, silicon and sulfur.

July 21, 2020: While it might look like a cosmic, space brain, this is actually an image of G292.0+1.8, a young, oxygen-rich remnant from a supernova that scientists think has a pulsar at its center, surrounded by outflowing material. The image, taken by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory 

Observations using Chandra have created strong evidence that there is a pulsar in G292.0+1.8. Using observations like this, astronomers can study the connection between pulsars (a magnetized, rotating neutron star that emits electromagnetic radiation) and massive stars. 

In this image, you can see a shell of expanding gas 36 light-years across. The gas contains elements including oxygen, neon, magnesium, silicon and sulfur. 

A sparkling sea of galaxies

A sparkling galaxy shines in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The galaxy, known as PGC 29388, glimmers amidst a sea of more distant galaxies. It is a dwarf elliptical galaxy, named as such because it is “small” (relatively speaking) with “only” about 100 million to a few billion stars.
A sparkling galaxy shines in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The galaxy, known as PGC 29388, glimmers amidst a sea of more distant galaxies. It is a dwarf elliptical galaxy, named as such because it is “small” (relatively speaking) with “only” about 100 million to a few billion stars.

July 20, 2020: A sparkling galaxy shines in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The galaxy, known as PGC 29388, glimmers amidst a sea of more distant galaxies. It is a dwarf elliptical galaxy, named as such because it is “small” (relatively speaking) with “only” about 100 million to a few billion stars. 

Comet NEOWISE

Processed data from the WISPR instrument on NASA’s Parker Solar Probe shows greater detail in the twin tails of comet NEOWISE, as seen on July 5, 2020. The lower, broader tail is the comet’s dust tail, while the thinner, upper tail is the comet’s ion tail.
Processed data from the WISPR instrument on NASA’s Parker Solar Probe shows greater detail in the twin tails of comet NEOWISE, as seen on July 5, 2020. The lower, broader tail is the comet’s dust tail, while the thinner, upper tail is the comet’s ion tail.

July 17, 2020: This images shows the twin tails of Comet NEOWISE, as they appeared on July 5. The image, created by processing data from the WISPR instrument on NASA's Parker Solar Probe, shows a larger comet tail made up of dust and gas and a thin, upper ion tail. The comet came into view this month and skywatchers in the Northern Hemisphere have enjoyed observing the comet. 

Solar campfires

The European Space Agency's Solar Orbiter spacecraft swooped by the sun and, with its Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUI), took these images of the sun on May 30, 2020. This was the probe's first view of the sun, released today. In these images, you can see the sun's upper atmosphere at a wavelength of 17 nanometers, which is in an extreme part of the ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum.
The European Space Agency's Solar Orbiter spacecraft swooped by the sun and, with its Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUI), took these images of the sun on May 30, 2020. This was the probe's first view of the sun, released today. In these images, you can see the sun's upper atmosphere at a wavelength of 17 nanometers, which is in an extreme part of the ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum.

July 16, 2020: The European Space Agency's Solar Orbiter spacecraft swooped by the sun and, with its Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUI), took these images of the sun on May 30, 2020. This was the probe's first view of the sun, released today. In these images, you can see the sun's upper atmosphere at a wavelength of 17 nanometers, which is in an extreme part of the ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum.

Minotaur 4 poised for launch

A Minotaur 4 rocket is scheduled to liftoff today from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Virginia. The mission will launch the secret NROL-129 payload made up of four top secret spy satellites into orbit for the U.S. Space Force. "This will be our first U.S. Space Force mission and the first dedicated NRO mission from Wallops," said the Space Force's Lt. Col. Ryan Rose, chief of Launch Small Launch and Targets Division at the Space and Missile Systems Center, in an Air Force statement. "We look forward to continuing to launch national priority satellites for our NRO partner."
A Minotaur 4 rocket is scheduled to liftoff today from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Virginia. The mission will launch the secret NROL-129 payload made up of four top secret spy satellites into orbit for the U.S. Space Force. "This will be our first U.S. Space Force mission and the first dedicated NRO mission from Wallops," said the Space Force's Lt. Col. Ryan Rose, chief of Launch Small Launch and Targets Division at the Space and Missile Systems Center, in an Air Force statement. "We look forward to continuing to launch national priority satellites for our NRO partner."

July 15, 2020: A Minotaur 4 rocket is scheduled to liftoff today from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Virginia. The mission will launch the secret NROL-129 payload made up of four top secret spy satellites into orbit for the U.S. Space Force.

"This will be our first U.S. Space Force mission and the first dedicated NRO mission from Wallops," said the Space Force's Lt. Col. Ryan Rose, chief of Launch Small Launch and Targets Division at the Space and Missile Systems Center, in an Air Force statement. "We look forward to continuing to launch national priority satellites for our NRO partner."

Science in space

In this photo, taken last week and posted to Twitter July 13, 2020, NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy works on a piece of equipment aboard the International Space Station. In the image, Cassidy works on the equipment, a deployer known as the Nanoracks CubeSat Deployer, on the Japanese Experiment Module slide table.
In this photo, taken last week and posted to Twitter July 13, 2020, NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy works on a piece of equipment aboard the International Space Station. In the image, Cassidy works on the equipment, a deployer known as the Nanoracks CubeSat Deployer, on the Japanese Experiment Module slide table.

July 14, 2020: In this photo, taken last week and posted to Twitter July 13, 2020, NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy works on a piece of equipment aboard the International Space Station. In the image, Cassidy works on the equipment, a deployer known as the Nanoracks CubeSat Deployer, on the Japanese Experiment Module slide table. 

A stunning spiral galaxy

This image, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows the spiral galaxy NGC 7513. The galaxy, which is about 60 million light-years away, is located in the Sculptor constellation and moves at an astounding 972 miles (1,564 kilometers) per second away from planet Earth.
This image, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows the spiral galaxy NGC 7513. The galaxy, which is about 60 million light-years away, is located in the Sculptor constellation and moves at an astounding 972 miles (1,564 kilometers) per second away from planet Earth.

July 13, 2020: This image, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows the spiral galaxy NGC 7513. The galaxy, which is about 60 million light-years away, is located in the Sculptor constellation and moves at an astounding 972 miles (1,564 kilometers) per second away from planet Earth. 

Electric blue clouds

Electric blue streaks through the upper regions of Earth’s atmosphere every summer in the Northern Hemisphere. They usually swirl above the Arctic in the mesosphere (about 50 miles (80 kilometers) above Earth’s surface), but sometimes they form lower in the atmosphere and show up in other places across the globe.   This image shows an image of noctilucent (or night-shining) clouds on June 23. The image, made using data from NASA’s Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) craft, ic centered on the North Pole.
Electric blue streaks through the upper regions of Earth’s atmosphere every summer in the Northern Hemisphere. They usually swirl above the Arctic in the mesosphere (about 50 miles (80 kilometers) above Earth’s surface), but sometimes they form lower in the atmosphere and show up in other places across the globe. This image shows an image of noctilucent (or night-shining) clouds on June 23. The image, made using data from NASA’s Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) craft, ic centered on the North Pole.

July 10, 2020: Electric blue streaks through the upper regions of Earth’s atmosphere every summer in the Northern Hemisphere. They usually swirl above the Arctic in the mesosphere (about 50 miles (80 kilometers) above Earth’s surface), but sometimes they form lower in the atmosphere and show up in other places across the globe. 

This image shows an image of noctilucent (or night-shining) clouds on June 23. The image, made using data from NASA’s Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) craft, is centered on the North Pole. 

The X-ray universe

A map of the universe made using over a million X-ray sources observed by eROSITA.
A map of the universe made using over a million X-ray sources observed by eROSITA.

July 9, 2020: Scientists have created a new, detailed map of the universe, showcasing the cosmos in X-ray radiation. The map uses over a million X-ray sources observed by eROSITA (Extended Roentgen Survey with an Imaging Telescope Array), an instrument on the German-Russian satellite mission Spectrum-Röntgen-Gamma, or Spektr-RG

A fluffy-looking spiral galaxy

This image, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, showcases the fluffy (or flocculent), feathery features of the spiral galaxy NGC 2275. The galaxy is located 67 million light-years away in the constellation of Cancer.
This image, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, showcases the fluffy (or flocculent), feathery features of the spiral galaxy NGC 2275. The galaxy is located 67 million light-years away in the constellation of Cancer.

July 8, 2020: This image, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, showcases the fluffy (or flocculent), feathery features of the spiral galaxy NGC 2275. The galaxy is located 67 million light-years away in the constellation of Cancer.

Luminous clouds from space

Cosmonaut Ivan Vagner, who is currently on board the International Space Station, snapped this stunning new of luminous clouds on Earth from the station. Luminous clouds are the highest cloud formations in Earth’s atmosphere and they appear at an altitude of 43-59 miles (70-95 kilometers).
Cosmonaut Ivan Vagner, who is currently on board the International Space Station, snapped this stunning new of luminous clouds on Earth from the station. Luminous clouds are the highest cloud formations in Earth’s atmosphere and they appear at an altitude of 43-59 miles (70-95 kilometers).

July 7, 2020: Cosmonaut Ivan Vagner, who is currently on board the International Space Station, snapped this stunning new of luminous clouds on Earth from the station. Luminous clouds are the highest cloud formations in Earth’s atmosphere and they appear at an altitude of 43-59 miles (70-95 kilometers). 

A brilliant molecular cloud

In this image, you can see a piece of the Taurus Molecular Cloud, created using data from the European Space Agency’s Herschel and Planck space telescopes. The bright streaks in this picture show the emission by interstellar dust grains in different wavelengths. The draping pattern of lines shows the magnetic field orientation.
In this image, you can see a piece of the Taurus Molecular Cloud, created using data from the European Space Agency’s Herschel and Planck space telescopes. The bright streaks in this picture show the emission by interstellar dust grains in different wavelengths. The draping pattern of lines shows the magnetic field orientation.

July 6, 2020: In this image, you can see a piece of the Taurus Molecular Cloud, created using data from the European Space Agency’s Herschel and Planck space telescopes. The bright streaks in this picture show the emission by interstellar dust grains in different wavelengths. The draping pattern of lines shows the magnetic field orientation.  

A Martian landing site

This elevation map of Jezero Crater on Mars shows the site in a rainbow of colors, with lighter colors representing higher elevation. This Martian crater is the chosen landing site for NASA’s Perseverance rover, previously known as the Mars 2020 rover, which is set to launch to the Red Planet this summer.
This elevation map of Jezero Crater on Mars shows the site in a rainbow of colors, with lighter colors representing higher elevation. This Martian crater is the chosen landing site for NASA’s Perseverance rover, previously known as the Mars 2020 rover, which is set to launch to the Red Planet this summer.

July 2, 2020: This elevation map of Jezero Crater on Mars shows the site in a rainbow of colors, with lighter colors representing higher elevation. This Martian crater is the chosen landing site for NASA’s Perseverance rover, previously known as the Mars 2020 rover, which is set to launch to the Red Planet this summer. 

Prepping for a spacewalk

In this image, Expedition 63 flight engineers NASA astronaut Doug Hurley (middle left) and cosmonaut Ivan Vagner (middle right) helped to prepare NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Chris Cassidy for a spacewalk on June 26, 2020. Cassidy and Behnken stepped out for a spacewalk in which they replaced aging nickel-hydrogen batteries on the space station with brand new lithium-ion batteries. The pair embarked on another battery swap spacewalk today (July 1.)
In this image, Expedition 63 flight engineers NASA astronaut Doug Hurley (middle left) and cosmonaut Ivan Vagner (middle right) helped to prepare NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Chris Cassidy for a spacewalk on June 26, 2020. Cassidy and Behnken stepped out for a spacewalk in which they replaced aging nickel-hydrogen batteries on the space station with brand new lithium-ion batteries. The pair embarked on another battery swap spacewalk today (July 1.)

July 1, 2020: In this image, Expedition 63 flight engineers NASA astronaut Doug Hurley (middle left) and cosmonaut Ivan Vagner (middle right) helped to prepare NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Chris Cassidy for a spacewalk on June 26, 2020. Cassidy and Behnken stepped out for a spacewalk in which they replaced aging nickel-hydrogen batteries on the space station with brand new lithium-ion batteries. The pair embarked on another battery swap spacewalk today (July 1.) 

A stunning Dragon view

NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy snapped this photo of SpaceX's Crew Dragon vehicle docked with the International Space Station and with Earth's curvature in the background during a spacewalk with Bob Behnken on Friday, June 26, 2020.
NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy snapped this photo of SpaceX's Crew Dragon vehicle docked with the International Space Station and with Earth's curvature in the background during a spacewalk with Bob Behnken on Friday, June 26, 2020.

June 30, 2020: NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy snapped this photo of SpaceX's Crew Dragon vehicle docked with the International Space Station and with Earth's curvature in the background during a spacewalk with Bob Behnken on Friday, June 26, 2020. During this spacewalk, the pair of astronauts swapped out aging nickel-hydrogen batteries with brand new lithium-ion batteries on the space station. 

The knife edge galaxy

This new image, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows the incredible stretch of the galaxy NGC 5907, also known as the Knife Edge galaxy. This is a spiral galaxy, much like our home galaxy, the Milky Way. Though, you can’t see the galaxy’s brilliant spiral shape in this image as this image was taken facing the galaxy’s edge.
This new image, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows the incredible stretch of the galaxy NGC 5907, also known as the Knife Edge galaxy. This is a spiral galaxy, much like our home galaxy, the Milky Way. Though, you can’t see the galaxy’s brilliant spiral shape in this image as this image was taken facing the galaxy’s edge.

June 29, 2020: This new image, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, shows the incredible stretch of the galaxy NGC 5907, also known as the Knife Edge galaxy. This is a spiral galaxy, much like our home galaxy, the Milky Way. Though, you can’t see the galaxy’s brilliant spiral shape in this image as this image was taken facing the galaxy’s edge. 

A flapping space bat

In this image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope and released June 25, 2020,  you can see the star HBC 672, nicknamed "Bat Shadow." The strange feature got its name because it looks like a large, shadowy wing. But its name has even more meaning as, with new Hubble observations from a team led by Klaus Pontoppidan, an astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, Maryland, it appears as if the "bat wings" are "flapping."
In this image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope and released June 25, 2020, you can see the star HBC 672, nicknamed "Bat Shadow." The strange feature got its name because it looks like a large, shadowy wing. But its name has even more meaning as, with new Hubble observations from a team led by Klaus Pontoppidan, an astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, Maryland, it appears as if the "bat wings" are "flapping."

Friday, June 26, 2020: In this image taken by the Hubble Space Telescope and released June 25, 2020,  you can see the star HBC 672, nicknamed "Bat Shadow." The strange feature got its name because it looks like a large, shadowy wing. But its name has even more meaning as, with new Hubble observations from a team led by Klaus Pontoppidan, an astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, Maryland, it appears as if the "bat wings" are "flapping." 

A space station solar transit

This composite image shows the International Space Station as it transits in front of the sun. Made up of six different frames taken from Fredericksburg, Virginia, this image shows the space station moving at approximately 5 miles per second on June 24, 2020. Five astronauts are currently onboard the space station, including Expedition 63 NASA astronauts Chris Cassidy, Douglas Hurley and Robert Behnken and Roscosmos cosmonauts Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner.
This composite image shows the International Space Station as it transits in front of the sun. Made up of six different frames taken from Fredericksburg, Virginia, this image shows the space station moving at approximately 5 miles per second on June 24, 2020. Five astronauts are currently onboard the space station, including Expedition 63 NASA astronauts Chris Cassidy, Douglas Hurley and Robert Behnken and Roscosmos cosmonauts Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner.

Thursday, June 25, 2020: This composite image shows the International Space Station as it transits in front of the sun. Made up of six different frames taken from Fredericksburg, Virginia, this image shows the space station moving at approximately 5 miles per second on June 24, 2020. Five astronauts are currently onboard the space station, including Expedition 63 NASA astronauts Chris Cassidy, Douglas Hurley and Robert Behnken and Roscosmos cosmonauts Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner.

Cloud art from space

Veteran NASA astronaut Doug Hurley, who launched to the International Space Station aboard SpaceX's Crew Dragon craft as part of the company's Demo-2 mission on May 30, snapped this incredible photo from the space station. Hurley's view from space shows striking cloud formations over the South Pacific Ocean. "Cloud art in the South Pacific," Hurley wrote alongside the image which he shared on Twitter.
Veteran NASA astronaut Doug Hurley, who launched to the International Space Station aboard SpaceX's Crew Dragon craft as part of the company's Demo-2 mission on May 30, snapped this incredible photo from the space station. Hurley's view from space shows striking cloud formations over the South Pacific Ocean. "Cloud art in the South Pacific," Hurley wrote alongside the image which he shared on Twitter.

Wednesday, June 24, 2020: Veteran NASA astronaut Doug Hurley, who launched to the International Space Station aboard SpaceX's Crew Dragon craft as part of the company's Demo-2 mission on May 30, snapped this incredible photo from the space station. Hurley's view from space shows striking cloud formations over the South Pacific Ocean. "Cloud art in the South Pacific," Hurley wrote alongside the image which he shared on Twitter.

Stitching together a space station

Author, journalist and researcher Lee Brandon-Cremer created this panorama of the International Space Station using three images taken from aboard the station by European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano.  "For every spacewalk there are thousands of images taken. Sometimes a few images jump out at me,” Brandon-Cremer said in an ESA statement. “One day I realised I could stitch these images together to expand the scene and show what the astronaut sees in a broader sense.”
Author, journalist and researcher Lee Brandon-Cremer created this panorama of the International Space Station using three images taken from aboard the station by European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano. "For every spacewalk there are thousands of images taken. Sometimes a few images jump out at me,” Brandon-Cremer said in an ESA statement. “One day I realised I could stitch these images together to expand the scene and show what the astronaut sees in a broader sense.”

Tuesday, June 23, 2020: Author, journalist and researcher Lee Brandon-Cremer created this panorama of the International Space Station using three images taken from aboard the station by European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano. 

"For every spacewalk there are thousands of images taken. Sometimes a few images jump out at me,” Brandon-Cremer said in an ESA statement. “One day I realised I could stitch these images together to expand the scene and show what the astronaut sees in a broader sense.”

Spotting a "ring of fire"

With annular solar eclipses, the moon doesn't cover all of the sun. Instead, it leaves a brilliant "ring of fire" visible around its edge. The 2020 annular solar eclipse occurred on June 21, 2020. In this image, you can see the eclipse as it appeared on June 21, 2020 from  Xiamen, Fujian Province of China.
With annular solar eclipses, the moon doesn't cover all of the sun. Instead, it leaves a brilliant "ring of fire" visible around its edge. The 2020 annular solar eclipse occurred on June 21, 2020. In this image, you can see the eclipse as it appeared on June 21, 2020 from Xiamen, Fujian Province of China.

Monday, June 22, 2020: With annular solar eclipses, the moon doesn't cover all of the sun. Instead, it leaves a brilliant "ring of fire" visible around its edge. The 2020 annular solar eclipse occurred on June 21, 2020. In this image, you can see the eclipse as it appeared on June 21, 2020 from  Xiamen, Fujian Province of China. 

The stunning Butterfly Nebula

The Butterfly Nebula, also known as NGC 6302, is depicted here in a brilliant image taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. This nebula lies about 3,800 light-years away from planet Earth in the constellation Scorpius. The striking butterfly shape of the nebula stretches out an incredible distance, over two light-years.
The Butterfly Nebula, also known as NGC 6302, is depicted here in a brilliant image taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. This nebula lies about 3,800 light-years away from planet Earth in the constellation Scorpius. The striking butterfly shape of the nebula stretches out an incredible distance, over two light-years.

Friday, June 19, 2020: The Butterfly Nebula, also known as NGC 6302, is depicted here in a brilliant image taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble ...Space Telescope. This nebula lies about 3,800 light-years away from planet Earth in the constellation Scorpius. The striking butterfly shape of the nebula stretches out an incredible distance, over two light-years. — Chelsea Gohd

Juno spacecraft swings by Jupiter

This stunning image of Jupiter was taken by NASA's Juno spacecraft as it performed its Perijove 27 flyby of the gas giant. Perijove is the spot in a probe's (like Juno) orbit of Jupiter closest to the planet's center. Citizen scientist Kevin Gill processed the image using data Juno collected during the flyby which took place on June 2, 2020.
This stunning image of Jupiter was taken by NASA's Juno spacecraft as it performed its Perijove 27 flyby of the gas giant. Perijove is the spot in a probe's (like Juno) orbit of Jupiter closest to the planet's center. Citizen scientist Kevin Gill processed the image using data Juno collected during the flyby which took place on June 2, 2020.

Thursday, June 18, 2020: This stunning image of Jupiter was taken by NASA's Juno spacecraft as it performed its perijove 27 flyby of the gas giant. Perijove is the spot in a probe's (like Juno) orbit of Jupiter closest to the planet's center. Citizen scientist Kevin Gill processed the image using data Juno collected during the flyby which took place on June 2, 2020. — Chelsea Gohd

 

Space station's "storm hunter" turns two

The Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM), which monitors Earth's thunderstorms from the International Space Station, celebrated its second anniversary this week. ASIM, which is mounted outside the European module of the space station, launched in April 2018 and began science operations on June 14, 2018. The science payload looks for electrical discharges in Earth's upper atmosphere — known as red sprites, blue jets and elves — which appear as bright flashes of lighting that extend upward and into space. Because these events happen above thunderstorms, they are difficult to study from the ground, but airplane pilots have reported seeing them during flight.
The Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM), which monitors Earth's thunderstorms from the International Space Station, celebrated its second anniversary this week. ASIM, which is mounted outside the European module of the space station, launched in April 2018 and began science operations on June 14, 2018. The science payload looks for electrical discharges in Earth's upper atmosphere — known as red sprites, blue jets and elves — which appear as bright flashes of lighting that extend upward and into space. Because these events happen above thunderstorms, they are difficult to study from the ground, but airplane pilots have reported seeing them during flight.

Wednesday, June 17, 2020: The Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM), which monitors Earth's thunderstorms from the International Space Station, celebrated its second anniversary this week. ASIM, which is mounted outside the European module of the space station, launched in April 2018 and began science operations on June 14, 2018. The payload looks for electrical discharges in Earth's upper atmosphere — known as red sprites, blue jets and elves — which appear as bright flashes of lighting that extend upward and into space. Because these events happen above thunderstorms, they are difficult to study from the ground, but airplane pilots have reported seeing them during flight. — Hanneke Weitering
 

A stargazer under the Milky Way

Under a sea of stars, a skywatcher points to the beautiful arch of the Milky Way Galaxy in this 360-degree panorama from the Paranal Observatory in Chile. The stargazer in this shot is European Southern Observatory (ESO) photo ambassador Babak Tafreshi, and on the left are the telescopes that make up ESO's Very Large Telescope array, which consists of four boxy Unit Telescopes and four smaller auxiliary telescopes. The image was recently featured as ESO's Picture of the Week.
Under a sea of stars, a skywatcher points to the beautiful arch of the Milky Way Galaxy in this 360-degree panorama from the Paranal Observatory in Chile. The stargazer in this shot is European Southern Observatory (ESO) photo ambassador Babak Tafreshi, and on the left are the telescopes that make up ESO's Very Large Telescope array, which consists of four boxy Unit Telescopes and four smaller auxiliary telescopes. The image was recently featured as ESO's Picture of the Week.

Tuesday, June 16, 2020: Under a sea of stars, a skywatcher points to the beautiful arch of the Milky Way Galaxy in this 360-degree panorama from the Paranal Observatory in Chile. The stargazer in this shot is European Southern Observatory (ESO) photo ambassador Babak Tafreshi, and on the left are the telescopes that make up ESO's Very Large Telescope array, which consists of four boxy Unit Telescopes and four smaller auxiliary telescopes. The image was recently featured as ESO's Picture of the Week. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Auroras and airglow over Earth

Green and purple auroras shimmy above the orange airglow of Earth's upper atmosphere in this colorful view from the International Space Station. NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy captured this image while the space station was orbiting above the Indian Ocean, between the continents of Australia and Antarctica, on June 7, 2020.
Green and purple auroras shimmy above the orange airglow of Earth's upper atmosphere in this colorful view from the International Space Station. NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy captured this image while the space station was orbiting above the Indian Ocean, between the continents of Australia and Antarctica, on June 7, 2020.

Monday, June 15, 2020: Green and purple auroras shimmy above the orange airglow of Earth's upper atmosphere in this colorful view from the International Space Station. NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy captured this image while the space station was orbiting above the Indian Ocean, between the continents of Australia and Antarctica, on June 7. — Hanneke Weitering
 

A stellar photobomb

The spiral galaxy NGC 2608 gets "photobombed" by two stars inside our Milky Way galaxy in this new image from the Hubble Space Telescope. Bright Milky Way stars in the foreground of Hubble's deep-space images often appear as lens flares, like the one visible in the bottom right corner of this image. Another is just above the center of NGC 2608. All the other specks of light that pepper the black abyss around the galaxy are not stars, but thousands of other distant galaxies.
The spiral galaxy NGC 2608 gets "photobombed" by two stars inside our Milky Way galaxy in this new image from the Hubble Space Telescope. Bright Milky Way stars in the foreground of Hubble's deep-space images often appear as lens flares, like the one visible in the bottom right corner of this image. Another is just above the center of NGC 2608. All the other specks of light that pepper the black abyss around the galaxy are not stars, but thousands of other distant galaxies.

Friday, June 12, 2020: The spiral galaxy NGC 2608 gets "photobombed" by two stars inside our Milky Way galaxy in this new image from the Hubble Space Telescope. Bright Milky Way stars in the foreground of Hubble's deep-space images often appear as lens flares, like the one visible in the bottom right corner of this image. Another is just above the center of NGC 2608. All the other specks of light that pepper the black abyss around the galaxy are not stars, but thousands of other distant galaxies. "NGC 2608 is just one among an uncountable number of kindred structures," Hubble scientists said in a statement. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Webb telescope passes critical test

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope just passed another key milestone ahead of its planned launch in 2021. In a recent test at a Northrop Grumman facility in Redondo Beach, California, the new observatory deployed and extended its Deployable Tower Assembly. This component of the telescope separates its iconic gold mirrors from the spacecraft's scientific instruments and propulsion systems. Having that space there will allow the telescope's cooling systems to bring its instruments "down to staggeringly cold temperatures required to perform optimal science," NASA said in a statement.
NASA's James Webb Space Telescope just passed another key milestone ahead of its planned launch in 2021. In a recent test at a Northrop Grumman facility in Redondo Beach, California, the new observatory deployed and extended its Deployable Tower Assembly. This component of the telescope separates its iconic gold mirrors from the spacecraft's scientific instruments and propulsion systems. Having that space there will allow the telescope's cooling systems to bring its instruments "down to staggeringly cold temperatures required to perform optimal science," NASA said in a statement.

Thursday, June 11, 2020: NASA's James Webb Space Telescope just passed another key milestone ahead of its planned launch in 2021. In a recent test at a Northrop Grumman facility in Redondo Beach, California, the new observatory deployed and extended its Deployable Tower Assembly. This component of the telescope separates its iconic gold mirrors from the spacecraft's scientific instruments and propulsion systems. Having that space there will allow the telescope's cooling systems to bring its instruments "down to staggeringly cold temperatures required to perform optimal science," NASA said in a statement. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Waning "Strawberry Moon" seen from space

The waning gibbous moon rises over Earth's blue horizon in this photo taken by an astronaut at the International Space Station on Sunday (June 7), two days after the Full Strawberry Moon passed through Earth's outer shadow, causing a subtle penumbral lunar eclipse. An Expedition 63 crewmember captured this view as the space station was orbiting above the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of the African nation of Angola.
The waning gibbous moon rises over Earth's blue horizon in this photo taken by an astronaut at the International Space Station on Sunday (June 7), two days after the Full Strawberry Moon passed through Earth's outer shadow, causing a subtle penumbral lunar eclipse. An Expedition 63 crewmember captured this view as the space station was orbiting above the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of the African nation of Angola.

Wednesday, June 10, 2020: The waning gibbous moon rises over Earth's blue horizon in this photo taken by an astronaut at the International Space Station on Sunday (June 7), two days after the Full Strawberry Moon passed through Earth's outer shadow, causing a subtle penumbral lunar eclipse. An Expedition 63 crewmember captured this view as the space station was orbiting above the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of the African nation of Angola. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Eclipsed 'Strawberry Moon' rises over Portugal

The Full Strawberry Moon rises over Ponte da Ajuda, a historic bridge near the border between Portugal and Spain, during the penumbral lunar eclipse on Friday (June 5). Astrophotographer Sérgio Conceição created this composite image of the rising moon from Elvas, Portugal, at the end of the eclipse. During this subtle lunar eclipse, the moon passed through the faint outer part of Earth's shadow, known as the penumbra, causing its surface to appear slightly tea-stained. "It can be seen that the moon was born with a more intense reddish pink color and started to whiten as it rose," Conceição told Space.com in an email.
The Full Strawberry Moon rises over Ponte da Ajuda, a historic bridge near the border between Portugal and Spain, during the penumbral lunar eclipse on Friday (June 5). Astrophotographer Sérgio Conceição created this composite image of the rising moon from Elvas, Portugal, at the end of the eclipse. During this subtle lunar eclipse, the moon passed through the faint outer part of Earth's shadow, known as the penumbra, causing its surface to appear slightly tea-stained. "It can be seen that the moon was born with a more intense reddish pink color and started to whiten as it rose," Conceição told Space.com in an email.

Tuesday, June 9, 2020: The Full Strawberry Moon rises over Ponte da Ajuda, a historic bridge near the border between Portugal and Spain, during the penumbral lunar eclipse on Friday (June 5). Astrophotographer Sérgio Conceição created this composite image of the rising moon from Elvas, Portugal, at the end of the eclipse. During this subtle lunar eclipse, the moon passed through the faint outer part of Earth's shadow, known as the penumbra, causing its surface to appear slightly tea-stained. "It can be seen that the moon was born with a more intense reddish pink color and started to whiten as it rose," Conceição told Space.com in an email. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Crew Dragon spotted over Turkey

SpaceX's Crew Dragon spacecraft approaches the International Space Station with NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley in this photo captured by an astronaut on board the orbiting lab on May 31, shortly before the spacecraft docked with the station. When the image was taken, the space station was orbiting above southwestern Turkey, including the coastal city of Demre, seen here as a grey area below the Crew Dragon.
SpaceX's Crew Dragon spacecraft approaches the International Space Station with NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley in this photo captured by an astronaut on board the orbiting lab on May 31, shortly before the spacecraft docked with the station. When the image was taken, the space station was orbiting above southwestern Turkey, including the coastal city of Demre, seen here as a grey area below the Crew Dragon.

Monday, June 8, 2020: SpaceX's Crew Dragon spacecraft approaches the International Space Station with NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley in this photo captured by an astronaut on board the orbiting lab on May 31, shortly before the spacecraft docked with the station. When the image was taken, the space station was orbiting above southwestern Turkey, including the coastal city of Demre, seen here as a grey area below the Crew Dragon.  — Hanneke Weitering
 

Orange airglow over La Silla

The starry night sky is ablaze with orange airglow in this stunning, fulldome view of the La Silla Observatory in Chile, captured by astrophotographer Guillaume Doyen. This soft, orange luminescence is the result of solar particles interacting with Earth's atmosphere, causing the air to emit visible light. "Airglow on this night was especially intense, with the strong emissions of orange and red light rippling across the sky visible with the naked eye, even after the sun had set," officials with the European Southern Observatory (ESO), which operates telescopes at La Silla, said in an image description. ESO's TRAPPIST-South telescope, which famously discovered the TRAPPIST-1 system of Earth-size exoplanets, is visible in the foreground of the image.
The starry night sky is ablaze with orange airglow in this stunning, fulldome view of the La Silla Observatory in Chile, captured by astrophotographer Guillaume Doyen. This soft, orange luminescence is the result of solar particles interacting with Earth's atmosphere, causing the air to emit visible light. "Airglow on this night was especially intense, with the strong emissions of orange and red light rippling across the sky visible with the naked eye, even after the sun had set," officials with the European Southern Observatory (ESO), which operates telescopes at La Silla, said in an image description. ESO's TRAPPIST-South telescope, which famously discovered the TRAPPIST-1 system of Earth-size exoplanets, is visible in the foreground of the image.

Friday, June 5, 2020: The starry night sky is ablaze with orange airglow in this stunning, fulldome view of the La Silla Observatory in Chile, captured by astrophotographer Guillaume Doyen. This soft, orange luminescence is the result of solar particles interacting with Earth's atmosphere, causing the air to emit visible light. 

"Airglow on this night was especially intense, with the strong emissions of orange and red light rippling across the sky visible with the naked eye, even after the sun had set," officials with the European Southern Observatory (ESO), which operates telescopes at La Silla, said in an image description. ESO's TRAPPIST-South telescope, which famously discovered the TRAPPIST-1 system of Earth-size exoplanets, is visible in the foreground of the image. — Hanneke Weitering

Star cluster 'snowflakes'

Almost like snowflakes, the stars of the globular cluster NGC 6441 sparkle peacefully in the night sky, about 13 000 light-years from the Milky Way’s galactic center in this image released June 1, 2020 from the Hubble Space Telescope team.
Almost like snowflakes, the stars of the globular cluster NGC 6441 sparkle peacefully in the night sky, about 13 000 light-years from the Milky Way’s galactic center in this image released June 1, 2020 from the Hubble Space Telescope team.

Thursday, June 4, 2020: Sparkling stars shine like cosmic snowflakes in this image from the Hubble Space Telescope, which shows the globular cluster NGC 6441 13,000 light-years from the center of our Milky Way galaxy. While hard to count, together the stars in this cluster would weigh 1.6 million times the mas of our sun. This image was released by the European Space Agency's Hubble science team on June 1. — Tariq Malik

SpaceX's Falcon 9 returns to Florida

Another view of the Falcon 9 rocket first stage arriving in Florida's Port Canaveral on June 2, 2020.
Another view of the Falcon 9 rocket first stage arriving in Florida's Port Canaveral on June 2, 2020.

Wednesday, June 3, 2020: The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket booster that launched two NASA astronauts to the International Space Station this weekend returns to shore on the company's drone ship, called "Of Course I Still Love You." After launching the Crew Dragon capsule from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the rocket stuck an upright landing on the drone ship, which was stationed a few hundred miles off the Florida coast. It arrived in Florida's Port Canaveral on Tuesday (June 2). — Hanneke Weitering  
 

Crew Dragon approaches the space station

SpaceX's Crew Dragon spacecraft approaches the International Space Station with NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley, on May 31, 2020.
SpaceX's Crew Dragon spacecraft approaches the International Space Station with NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley, on May 31, 2020.

Tuesday, June 2, 2020: SpaceX's Crew Dragon spacecraft approaches the International Space Station with NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley on board in this photo captured by an astronaut inside the orbiting lab on Sunday (May 31). In the foreground of the image is the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA) robotic arm, which is attached to Japan's Kibo laboratory module. The Crew Dragon spacecraft docked at the station’s Harmony port on Sunday at 10:16 a.m. EDT (1416 GMT), while both spacecraft were flying about 262 miles (422 kilometers) above the northern border of China and Mongolia. — Hanneke Weitering
 

SpaceX makes history

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches the Crew Dragon Demo-2 mission to the International Space Station with NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley, on May 30, 2020, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launches the Crew Dragon Demo-2 mission to the International Space Station with NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley, on May 30, 2020, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Monday, June 1, 2020: A false-color, infrared exposure shows SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket and first Crew Dragon spacecraft with astronauts on board lifting off from NASA's historic Launch Complex 39A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The historic launch on Saturday (May 30) was the first commercial flight to orbit and the first time NASA astronauts launched from the United States in nearly a  decade. NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley safely arrived at the International  Space Station Sunday morning. — Hanneke Weitering  
 

Hubble eyes a star cluster with a dustless heart

The massive star cluster Westerlund 2, seen here in a new image from the Hubble Space Telescope, is filled with young stars surrounded by dense clouds of interstellar dust that's in the process of forming baby planets. But the stars in the center of the cluster don't have the same planet-building supplies as their neighbors near the cluster's outskirts, Hubble observations have revealed. The absence of dust in the center of Westerlund 2 is caused by "blistering ultraviolet radiation and hurricane-like stellar winds" coming from the biggest and brightest stars of the cluster, which congregate in the cluster's core, eroding and blasting away all the dust, Hubble officials said in a statement.
The massive star cluster Westerlund 2, seen here in a new image from the Hubble Space Telescope, is filled with young stars surrounded by dense clouds of interstellar dust that's in the process of forming baby planets. But the stars in the center of the cluster don't have the same planet-building supplies as their neighbors near the cluster's outskirts, Hubble observations have revealed. The absence of dust in the center of Westerlund 2 is caused by "blistering ultraviolet radiation and hurricane-like stellar winds" coming from the biggest and brightest stars of the cluster, which congregate in the cluster's core, eroding and blasting away all the dust, Hubble officials said in a statement.

Friday, May 29, 2020: The massive star cluster Westerlund 2, seen here in a new image from the Hubble Space Telescope, is filled with young stars surrounded by dense clouds of interstellar dust that's in the process of forming baby planets. But the stars in the center of the cluster don't have the same planet-building supplies as their neighbors near the cluster's outskirts, Hubble observations have revealed. The absence of dust in the center of Westerlund 2 is caused by "blistering ultraviolet radiation and hurricane-like stellar winds" coming from the biggest and brightest stars of the cluster, which congregate in the cluster's core, eroding and blasting away all the dust, Hubble officials said in a statement. — Hanneke Weitering

Crew Dragon at sunset

The sun sets behind a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket on Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida for the last time before the rocket's planned launch of two NASA astronauts to the International Space Station. The Falcon 9 rocket, topped with SpaceX's Crew Dragon spacecraft, is set to launch the Demo-2 mission from this historic launch pad today at 4:33 p.m. EDT (2033 GMT), weather permitting. On board will be Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley, who will become the first NASA astronauts to travel to the International Space Station in a commercial spacecraft. SpaceX founder Elon Musk tweeted this photo on Tuesday night (May 26).
The sun sets behind a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket on Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida for the last time before the rocket's planned launch of two NASA astronauts to the International Space Station. The Falcon 9 rocket, topped with SpaceX's Crew Dragon spacecraft, is set to launch the Demo-2 mission from this historic launch pad today at 4:33 p.m. EDT (2033 GMT), weather permitting. On board will be Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley, who will become the first NASA astronauts to travel to the International Space Station in a commercial spacecraft. SpaceX founder Elon Musk tweeted this photo on Tuesday night (May 26).

Wednesday, May 27, 2020: The sun sets behind a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket on Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida for the last time before the rocket's planned launch of two NASA astronauts to the International Space Station. The Falcon 9 rocket, topped with SpaceX's Crew Dragon spacecraft, is set to launch the Demo-2 mission from this historic launch pad today at 4:33 p.m. EDT (2033 GMT), weather permitting. On board will be Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley, who will become the first NASA astronauts to travel to the International Space Station in a commercial spacecraft. SpaceX founder Elon Musk tweeted this photo on Tuesday night (May 26). — Hanneke Weitering
 

Clouds roll in over Crew Dragon

Dark clouds loom over a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket on NASA's historic Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Monday (May 25), just two days before the rocket is scheduled to launch a Crew Dragon spacecraft on its first crewed test flight to the International Space Station. NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley will become the first people to launch to orbit from American soil in nearly a decade after they lift off on Wednesday (May 27). SpaceX and NASA officials completed the final launch readiness review on Monday and declared the mission "go" for launch, but officials are keeping an eye on some potentially troublesome weather that could push to launch to this weekend (May 30-31).
Dark clouds loom over a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket on NASA's historic Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Monday (May 25), just two days before the rocket is scheduled to launch a Crew Dragon spacecraft on its first crewed test flight to the International Space Station. NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley will become the first people to launch to orbit from American soil in nearly a decade after they lift off on Wednesday (May 27). SpaceX and NASA officials completed the final launch readiness review on Monday and declared the mission "go" for launch, but officials are keeping an eye on some potentially troublesome weather that could push to launch to this weekend (May 30-31).

Tuesday, May 26, 2020: Dark clouds loom over a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket on NASA's historic Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida in this photo captured on Monday (May 25), just two days before the rocket is scheduled to launch a Crew Dragon spacecraft on its first crewed test flight to the International Space Station. NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley will become the first people to launch to orbit from U.S. soil in nearly a decade after they lift off in the Crew Dragon on Wednesday (May 27). SpaceX and NASA officials completed the final launch readiness review on Monday and declared the mission "go" for launch, but officials are keeping an eye on some potentially troublesome weather that could push to launch to this weekend (May 30-31). — Hanneke Weitering
 

Behold, SpaceX's Demo-2 Crew Dragon

SpaceX's first Crew Dragon to carry astronauts and its Falcon 9 rocket stand atop Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center ahead of a planned May 27, 2020 launch.
SpaceX's first Crew Dragon to carry astronauts and its Falcon 9 rocket stand atop Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center ahead of a planned May 27, 2020 launch.

Monday, May 25, 2020: SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule and its Falcon 9 rocket stand atop Launch Pad 39A of NASA's Kennedy Space Center amid a dazzling twilight sky in this view released by SpaceX CEO Elon Musk on Sunday, May 24. The spacecraft is poised to launch the first astronauts into orbit from U.S. soil since 2011 under a commercial crew contract with NASA. Read our full coverage here. — Tariq Malik
 

Crew Dragon arrives at the launch pad

SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule sits ready for launch atop a Falcon 9 rocket on Launch Complex 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. On Wednesday (May 27), two NASA astronauts will launch to the International Space Station for the first crewed test flight of a Crew Dragon spacecraft. The Crew Dragon and Falcon 9 rocket reached the launch site on Thursday (May 21).
SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule sits ready for launch atop a Falcon 9 rocket on Launch Complex 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. On Wednesday (May 27), two NASA astronauts will launch to the International Space Station for the first crewed test flight of a Crew Dragon spacecraft. The Crew Dragon and Falcon 9 rocket reached the launch site on Thursday (May 21).

Friday, May 22, 2020: SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule sits ready for launch atop a Falcon 9 rocket on Launch Complex 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. On Wednesday (May 27), two NASA astronauts will launch to the International Space Station for the first crewed test flight of a Crew Dragon spacecraft. The Crew Dragon and Falcon 9 rocket reached the launch site on Thursday (May 21). — Hanneke Weitering
 

A cosmic selfie

Surrounded by telescopes, European Southern Observatory photo ambassador Petr Horálek basks in the light of the Milky Way galaxy in this cosmic selfie. The panoramic image shows Horálek standing among the many antennas that make up the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Atacama Desert in Chile.
Surrounded by telescopes, European Southern Observatory photo ambassador Petr Horálek basks in the light of the Milky Way galaxy in this cosmic selfie. The panoramic image shows Horálek standing among the many antennas that make up the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Atacama Desert in Chile.

Thursday, May 21, 2020: Surrounded by telescopes, European Southern Observatory photo ambassador Petr Horálek basks in the light of the Milky Way galaxy in this cosmic selfie. The panoramic image shows Horálek standing among the many antennas that make up the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in the Atacama Desert in Chile. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Tropical Cyclone Amphan hits India

Wednesday, May 20, 2020: Tropical Cyclone Amphan, the strongest storm ever recorded in the Bay of Bengal, approaches eastern India and Bangladesh in this view captured by NASA's Terra satellite on Tuesday (May 19). The storm made landfall today near Sagar Island in West Bengal, India, near the border with Bangladesh. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Milky Way meets the zodiacal light

Tuesday, May 19, 2020: The dusty arc of the Milky Way galaxy stretches across the night sky in this circular fisheye view. European Southern Observatory (ESO) photo ambassador Mahdi Zamani captured this image from Cerro Armazones, a mountain in northern Chile. "Thanks to the exceptionally clear and dark skies, the thousands of stars and dusty clouds that make up the Milky Way Galaxy are visible," ESO said in an image description. The elusive zodiacal light is shown in the top right while a faint orange airglow lights up the entire night sky. — Hanneke Weitering
 

A galactic duet

Two spiral galaxies collectively known as Arp 271 look like they're getting ready to collide. The two interacting galaxies, NGC 5426 and NGC 5427, have formed a bridge of material where new stars are beginning to form. If the galaxies do end up crashing into each other, the collision will trigger a wave of new star formation over the next few million years, according to the European Southern Observatory (ESO). This same type of interaction may happen to our own Milky Way galaxy when it collides with the Andromeda galaxy in the next five billion years or so, ESO said.
Two spiral galaxies collectively known as Arp 271 look like they're getting ready to collide. The two interacting galaxies, NGC 5426 and NGC 5427, have formed a bridge of material where new stars are beginning to form. If the galaxies do end up crashing into each other, the collision will trigger a wave of new star formation over the next few million years, according to the European Southern Observatory (ESO). This same type of interaction may happen to our own Milky Way galaxy when it collides with the Andromeda galaxy in the next five billion years or so, ESO said.

Monday, May 18, 2020: Two spiral galaxies collectively known as Arp 271 look like they're getting ready to collide. The two interacting galaxies, NGC 5426 and NGC 5427, have formed a bridge of material where new stars are beginning to form. If the galaxies do end up crashing into each other, the collision will trigger a wave of new star formation over the next few million years, according to the European Southern Observatory (ESO). This same type of interaction may happen to our own Milky Way galaxy when it collides with the Andromeda galaxy in the next five billion years or so, ESO said. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Crew Dragon splashes down after drop test

A mockup of SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule with two crash test dummies inside splashes into the water during a drop test at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. SpaceX conducted a series of these drop tests in March 2019 to find out how different wind and parachute dynamics affect the capsule during a splashdown, and to make sure its astronaut occupants can safely return to Earth.
A mockup of SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule with two crash test dummies inside splashes into the water during a drop test at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. SpaceX conducted a series of these drop tests in March 2019 to find out how different wind and parachute dynamics affect the capsule during a splashdown, and to make sure its astronaut occupants can safely return to Earth.

Friday, May 15, 2020: A mockup of SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule with two crash test dummies inside splashes into the water during a drop test at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. SpaceX conducted a series of these drop tests in March 2019 to find out how different wind and parachute dynamics affect the capsule during a splashdown, and to make sure its astronaut occupants can safely return to Earth. Less than two weeks from now, a real Crew Dragon will launch astronauts to the International Space Station for the first time. — Hanneke Weitering
 

A galactic bridge in Abell 2384

A few hundred millions years ago, two galaxy clusters collectively known as Abell 2384 collided, passing through each other and creating a "bridge" of hot gas between the clusters that spans more than 3 million light-years. A new composite image of Abell 2384 has revealed that a supermassive black hole lurking at the center of one of these galaxy clusters is shaping this galactic bridge by blasting it with a powerful jet of energetic particles. The new image combines X-ray data from Europe's XMM-Newton telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory (shown in blue), along with radio observations from the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope in India (shown in red) and optical data from the Digitized Sky Survey (shown in yellow).
A few hundred millions years ago, two galaxy clusters collectively known as Abell 2384 collided, passing through each other and creating a "bridge" of hot gas between the clusters that spans more than 3 million light-years. A new composite image of Abell 2384 has revealed that a supermassive black hole lurking at the center of one of these galaxy clusters is shaping this galactic bridge by blasting it with a powerful jet of energetic particles. The new image combines X-ray data from Europe's XMM-Newton telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory (shown in blue), along with radio observations from the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope in India (shown in red) and optical data from the Digitized Sky Survey (shown in yellow).

Thursday, May 14, 2020: A few hundred millions years ago, two distant galaxy clusters collectively known as Abell 2384 collided, passing through each other and creating a "bridge" of hot gas between the clusters that spans more than 3 million light-years. A new composite image of Abell 2384 has revealed that a supermassive black hole lurking at the center of one of these galaxy clusters is shaping this galactic bridge by blasting it with a powerful jet of energetic particles. 

The new image combines X-ray data from Europe's XMM-Newton telescope and NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory (shown in blue), along with radio observations from the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope in India (shown in red) and optical data from the Digitized Sky Survey (shown in yellow). — Hanneke Weitering
 

So long, Cygnus!

Northrop Grumman's Cygnus NG-13 cargo resupply spacecraft, with its shiny, cymbal-shaped solar arrays, is pictured in the grasp of the Canadarm2 robot arm on the International Space Station just before the vessel's departure on Monday (May 11). The NG-13 cargo ship, which delivered 7,500 lbs. (3,400 kilograms) of supplies for the station's three-person Expedition 62 crew in February, will spend the next few weeks flying solo in orbit, deploying tiny satellites and conducting a fire experiment. It will fall back to Earth on May 29 and safely burn up in our planet's atmosphere above the Pacific Ocean.
Northrop Grumman's Cygnus NG-13 cargo resupply spacecraft, with its shiny, cymbal-shaped solar arrays, is pictured in the grasp of the Canadarm2 robot arm on the International Space Station just before the vessel's departure on Monday (May 11). The NG-13 cargo ship, which delivered 7,500 lbs. (3,400 kilograms) of supplies for the station's three-person Expedition 62 crew in February, will spend the next few weeks flying solo in orbit, deploying tiny satellites and conducting a fire experiment. It will fall back to Earth on May 29 and safely burn up in our planet's atmosphere above the Pacific Ocean.

Wednesday, May 13, 2020: Northrop Grumman's Cygnus NG-13 cargo resupply spacecraft, with its shiny, cymbal-shaped solar arrays, is pictured in the grasp of the Canadarm2 robot arm on the International Space Station just before the vessel's departure on Monday (May 11). The NG-13 cargo ship, which delivered 7,500 lbs. (3,400 kilograms) of supplies for the station's three-person Expedition 62 crew in February, will spend the next few weeks flying solo in orbit, deploying tiny satellites and conducting a fire experiment. It will fall back to Earth on May 29 and safely burn up in our planet's atmosphere above the Pacific Ocean. — Hanneke Weitering
 

NASA satellite spots a winter wonderland

This wintery landscape may look like the scene of an ancient, frosty river on Mars, but this image was taken by a satellite orbiting our own planet. The winding waterway flowing through this frame is the Dnieper River in Ukraine. It is the fourth-longest river in Europe, with a total length of about 1,400 miles (2,200 kilometers). NASA's Terra satellite captured this view of a portion of the Dnieper River near the Ukrainian city of Oster using its Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument, which images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.
This wintery landscape may look like the scene of an ancient, frosty river on Mars, but this image was taken by a satellite orbiting our own planet. The winding waterway flowing through this frame is the Dnieper River in Ukraine. It is the fourth-longest river in Europe, with a total length of about 1,400 miles (2,200 kilometers). NASA's Terra satellite captured this view of a portion of the Dnieper River near the Ukrainian city of Oster using its Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument, which images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

Tuesday, May 12, 2020: This wintery landscape may look like the scene of an ancient, frosty river on Mars, but this image was taken by a satellite orbiting our own planet. The winding waterway flowing through this frame is the Dnieper River in Ukraine. It is the fourth-longest river in Europe, with a total length of about 1,400 miles (2,200 kilometers). NASA's Terra satellite captured this view of a portion of the Dnieper River near the Ukrainian city of Oster using its Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument, which images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. — Hanneke Weitering

First responders honored in space

To honor the frontline medical workers of the COVID-19 pandemic on the 75th anniversary of Victory in Europe Day, which marked the end of World War II in Europe, NASA astronaut Andrew Morgan tweeted this photo of a WWII medical armband floating in the Cupola observatory of the International Space Station.  "Much like first responders on the frontlines today, 75 years ago combat medics bravely faced grave danger to save fellow #Soldiers on the battlefield," Morgan tweeted May 8. "This WW2 medical armband accompanied me to @space_station and will soon reside @NatlArmyMuseum." Morgan returned from the space station in April after spending 272 days on board the orbiting lab.
To honor the frontline medical workers of the COVID-19 pandemic on the 75th anniversary of Victory in Europe Day, which marked the end of World War II in Europe, NASA astronaut Andrew Morgan tweeted this photo of a WWII medical armband floating in the Cupola observatory of the International Space Station. "Much like first responders on the frontlines today, 75 years ago combat medics bravely faced grave danger to save fellow #Soldiers on the battlefield," Morgan tweeted May 8. "This WW2 medical armband accompanied me to @space_station and will soon reside @NatlArmyMuseum." Morgan returned from the space station in April after spending 272 days on board the orbiting lab.

Monday, May 11, 2020: To honor the frontline medical workers of the COVID-19 pandemic on the 75th anniversary of Victory in Europe Day, which marked the end of World War II in Europe, NASA astronaut Andrew Morgan tweeted this photo of a WWII medical armband floating in the Cupola observatory of the International Space Station. 

"Much like first responders on the frontlines today, 75 years ago combat medics bravely faced grave danger to save fellow #Soldiers on the battlefield," Morgan tweeted May 8. "This WW2 medical armband accompanied me to @space_station and will soon reside @NatlArmyMuseum." Morgan returned from the space station in April after spending 272 days on board the orbiting lab. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Hubble eyes a two-armed galaxy

This new image from the Hubble Space Telescope features the barred spiral galaxy NGC 3583. Located some 98 million light-years away from Earth in the constellation Ursa Major, NGC 3583 is about three-quarters the size of our Milky Way galaxy. But while the Milky Way has four distinct spiral arms that wrap around its galactic core, NGC 3583 has two long arms that twist out into the universe. Astronomers have observed two supernova explosions in this galaxy, one in 1975 and then again in 2015.
This new image from the Hubble Space Telescope features the barred spiral galaxy NGC 3583. Located some 98 million light-years away from Earth in the constellation Ursa Major, NGC 3583 is about three-quarters the size of our Milky Way galaxy. But while the Milky Way has four distinct spiral arms that wrap around its galactic core, NGC 3583 has two long arms that twist out into the universe. Astronomers have observed two supernova explosions in this galaxy, one in 1975 and then again in 2015.

Friday, May 8, 2020: This new image from the Hubble Space Telescope features the barred spiral galaxy NGC 3583. Located some 98 million light-years away from Earth in the constellation Ursa Major, NGC 3583 is about three-quarters the size of our Milky Way galaxy. But while the Milky Way has four distinct spiral arms that wrap around its galactic core, NGC 3583 has two long arms that twist out into the universe. Astronomers have observed two supernova explosions in this galaxy, one in 1975 and then again in 2015. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Full Flower Supermoon

The nearly-full moon of May, known as the Flower Moon, gleams against the twilight sky in this photo taken by Kevin M. Gill of Los Angeles, California, on the evening of May 6, 2020. The moon reached full phase the next morning (May 7) at 6:45 a.m. EDT (1045 GMT). According to NASA, this was the fourth and final "supermoon" of 2020, although some astronomers disagree about whether it qualified as a "supermoon."
The nearly-full moon of May, known as the Flower Moon, gleams against the twilight sky in this photo taken by Kevin M. Gill of Los Angeles, California, on the evening of May 6, 2020. The moon reached full phase the next morning (May 7) at 6:45 a.m. EDT (1045 GMT). According to NASA, this was the fourth and final "supermoon" of 2020, although some astronomers disagree about whether it qualified as a "supermoon."

Thursday, May 7, 2020: The nearly-full moon of May, known as the Flower Moon, gleams against the twilight sky in this photo taken by Kevin M. Gill of Los Angeles, California, on Wednesday night. The moon reached full phase this morning at 6:45 a.m. EDT (1045 GMT). According to NASA, this was the fourth and final "supermoon" of 2020, although some astronomers disagree about whether it qualified as a "supermoon." — Hanneke Weitering
 

A black hole hides among the stars

This wide-field view shows the region of the sky, in the constellation of Telescopium, where HR 6819 can be found.
This wide-field view shows the region of the sky, in the constellation of Telescopium, where HR 6819 can be found.

Wednesday, May 6, 2020: Lurking stealthily in the center of this wide-field image of the Telescopium constellation is the closest black hole to Earth, a record-breaking discovery that astronomers announced today. The newfound black hole is located about 1,000 light-years from Earth in what astronomers originally believed to be a binary, or double-star system. But thorough observations of the star system, called HR 6819, revealed an invisible third object influencing the stars' orbits. Although the black hole itself is invisible, the stars in the HR 6819 system are bright enough to see without a telescope in a dark, clear sky from the Southern Hemisphere. This image of HR 6819 was captured as part of the Digitized Sky Survey 2. — Hanneke Weitering
 

An astronaut's view of the Big Apple

This photo of Earth from space, captured by an astronaut at the International Space Station, features the Greater New York City area, including parts of Westchester, Long Island and New Jersey. An Expedition 63 crewmember captured this view of the Big Apple from approximately 257 miles (413 kilometers) overhead on April 28, 2020.
This photo of Earth from space, captured by an astronaut at the International Space Station, features the Greater New York City area, including parts of Westchester, Long Island and New Jersey. An Expedition 63 crewmember captured this view of the Big Apple from approximately 257 miles (413 kilometers) overhead on April 28, 2020.

Tuesday, May 5, 2020: This photo of Earth from space, captured by an astronaut at the International Space Station, features the Greater New York City area, including parts of Westchester, Long Island and New Jersey. An Expedition 63 crewmember captured this view of the Big Apple from approximately 257 miles (413 kilometers) overhead on April 28. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Mexico seen from space

An astronaut on board the International Space Station captured almost all of Mexico in a single shot while photographing planet Earth from inside the station's Cupola observatory. Framing the shot is the center window of the Cupola, and the golden solar array of a Cygnus cargo spacecraft is visible below.
An astronaut on board the International Space Station captured almost all of Mexico in a single shot while photographing planet Earth from inside the station's Cupola observatory. Framing the shot is the center window of the Cupola, and the golden solar array of a Cygnus cargo spacecraft is visible below.

Monday, May 4, 2020: An astronaut on board the International Space Station captured almost all of Mexico in a single shot while photographing planet Earth from inside the station's Cupola observatory. Framing the shot is the center window of the Cupola, and the golden solar array of a Cygnus cargo spacecraft is visible below. You can find an annotated version of this image from NASA here. — Hanneke Weitering
 

"Stretched" spiral galaxy bursts with baby stars

A new image from the Hubble Space Telescope features the sparkling spiral galaxy NGC 4100, which is teeming with baby stars. The galaxy's spiral arms are speckled with pockets of bright blue starlight radiating from hot newborn stars. NGC 4100 is located about 67 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Ursa Major, and it belongs to a group of galaxies called the Ursa Major Cluster. It's about three-quarters the size of the Milky Way, which is also a spiral galaxy, and it "looks almost stretched across the sky" in this new view, Hubble scientists said in a statement. The space telescope captured this image using its Advanced Camera for Surveys, and it was released today (May 1).
A new image from the Hubble Space Telescope features the sparkling spiral galaxy NGC 4100, which is teeming with baby stars. The galaxy's spiral arms are speckled with pockets of bright blue starlight radiating from hot newborn stars. NGC 4100 is located about 67 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Ursa Major, and it belongs to a group of galaxies called the Ursa Major Cluster. It's about three-quarters the size of the Milky Way, which is also a spiral galaxy, and it "looks almost stretched across the sky" in this new view, Hubble scientists said in a statement. The space telescope captured this image using its Advanced Camera for Surveys, and it was released today (May 1).

Friday, May 1, 2020: A new image from the Hubble Space Telescope features the sparkling spiral galaxy NGC 4100, which is teeming with baby stars. The galaxy's spiral arms are speckled with pockets of bright blue starlight radiating from hot newborn stars. NGC 4100 is located about 67 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Ursa Major, and it belongs to a group of galaxies called the Ursa Major Cluster. It's about three-quarters the size of the Milky Way, which is also a spiral galaxy, and it "looks almost stretched across the sky" in this new view, Hubble scientists said in a statement. The space telescope captured this image using its Advanced Camera for Surveys, and it was released today (May 1). — Hanneke Weitering

"Spiders" spotted on Mars

Strange spider-like features creep on the surface of Mars in this image taken by the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on board NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. These spidery landforms are what scientists call "araneiform" terrain, which literally translates to "spider-like." The features arise because the Red Planet's climate is so cold that during the Martian winter, carbon dioxide freezes from the atmosphere and accumulates as ice on the surface. When that ice begins to thaw in the spring, that carbon dioxide sublimates back into the atmosphere, or turns from a solid to a gas, leaving behind deep troughs in the terrain as gas is trapped below the surface.
Strange spider-like features creep on the surface of Mars in this image taken by the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on board NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. These spidery landforms are what scientists call "araneiform" terrain, which literally translates to "spider-like." The features arise because the Red Planet's climate is so cold that during the Martian winter, carbon dioxide freezes from the atmosphere and accumulates as ice on the surface. When that ice begins to thaw in the spring, that carbon dioxide sublimates back into the atmosphere, or turns from a solid to a gas, leaving behind deep troughs in the terrain as gas is trapped below the surface.

Thursday, April 30, 2020: Strange, spider-like features creep on the surface of Mars in this image taken by the High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on board NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. These spidery landforms are what scientists call "araneiform" terrain, which literally translates to "spider-like." The features arise because the Red Planet's climate is so cold that during the Martian winter, carbon dioxide freezes from the atmosphere and accumulates as ice on the surface. When that ice begins to thaw in the spring, that carbon dioxide sublimates back into the atmosphere, or turns from a solid to a gas, leaving behind deep troughs in the terrain as gas is trapped below the surface. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Dwarf galaxy "steals the show" in Hubble image

In a deep-space image featuring countless distant galaxies of all shapes and sizes, a tiny dwarf galaxy takes center stage. The small elliptical galaxy in the foreground of this new Hubble Space Telescope image is known as PGC 29388. It contains between 100 million to a few billion stars, which pales in comparison to our Milky Way galaxy, which has 250 to 400 billion stars. Hubble scientists released this image of PGC 29388 on April 20, a few days before the telescope celebrated its 30th anniversary.
In a deep-space image featuring countless distant galaxies of all shapes and sizes, a tiny dwarf galaxy takes center stage. The small elliptical galaxy in the foreground of this new Hubble Space Telescope image is known as PGC 29388. It contains between 100 million to a few billion stars, which pales in comparison to our Milky Way galaxy, which has 250 to 400 billion stars. Hubble scientists released this image of PGC 29388 on April 20, a few days before the telescope celebrated its 30th anniversary.

Wednesday, April 29, 2020: In a deep-space image featuring countless distant galaxies of all shapes and sizes, a tiny dwarf galaxy takes center stage. The small elliptical galaxy in the foreground of this new Hubble Space Telescope image is known as PGC 29388. It contains between 100 million to a few billion stars, which pales in comparison to our Milky Way galaxy, which has 250 to 400 billion stars. "As beautiful as the surrounding space may be, the sparkling galaxy in the foreground of this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope undeniably steals the show," Hubble scientists said in a statement. The image was released  on April 20, a few days before the telescope celebrated its 30th anniversary. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Milky Way sparkles over La Silla

The arc of the Milky Way galaxy shimmers over the La Silla Observatory in Chile in this gorgeous night-sky view by European Southern Observatory (ESO) photo ambassador Petr Horálek. In the center of the image is the ESO 3.6-metre telescope, and to its left is the Swiss 1.2-metre Leonhard Euler telescope. Visible beneath the righthand limb of the Milky Way's starry arc are the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, two satellite galaxies of the Milky Way. Saturn is visible under the left side of the arc, with Jupiter glowing brightly just above it and slightly to the left.
The arc of the Milky Way galaxy shimmers over the La Silla Observatory in Chile in this gorgeous night-sky view by European Southern Observatory (ESO) photo ambassador Petr Horálek. In the center of the image is the ESO 3.6-metre telescope, and to its left is the Swiss 1.2-metre Leonhard Euler telescope. Visible beneath the righthand limb of the Milky Way's starry arc are the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, two satellite galaxies of the Milky Way. Saturn is visible under the left side of the arc, with Jupiter glowing brightly just above it and slightly to the left.

Tuesday, April 28, 2020: The arc of the Milky Way galaxy shimmers over the La Silla Observatory in Chile in this gorgeous night-sky view by European Southern Observatory (ESO) photo ambassador Petr Horálek. In the center of the image is the ESO 3.6-metre telescope, and to its left is the Swiss 1.2-metre Leonhard Euler telescope. Visible beneath the righthand limb of the Milky Way's starry arc are the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, two satellite galaxies of the Milky Way. Saturn is visible under the left side of the arc, with Jupiter glowing brightly just above it and slightly to the left. You can see more in a 360-degree panoramic version of this image here. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Venus meets the crescent moon

The bright "evening star" Venus shines near the crescent moon in this photo captured by astrophysicist Gianluca Masi of the Virtual Telescope Project. Venus and the moon made a close approach in the evening sky yesterday (April 26), and the planet will reach its greatest brightness of the year tomorrow (April 28).
The bright "evening star" Venus shines near the crescent moon in this photo captured by astrophysicist Gianluca Masi of the Virtual Telescope Project. Venus and the moon made a close approach in the evening sky yesterday (April 26), and the planet will reach its greatest brightness of the year tomorrow (April 28).

Monday, April 27, 2020: The bright "evening star" Venus shines near the crescent moon in this photo captured by astrophysicist Gianluca Masi of the Virtual Telescope Project in Rome. Venus and the moon made a close approach in the evening sky yesterday (April 26), and the planet will reach its greatest brightness of the year tomorrow (April 28). — Hanneke Weitering
 

Hubble captures a "cosmic reef"

Happy birthday, Hubble! To celebrate the 30th anniversary of the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope, NASA released this new image of a "cosmic undersea world" that is teeming with stars and colorful clouds of interstellar dust and gas. The image features the giant red nebula NGC 2014 and its smaller blue companion NGC 2020, both located in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small satellite galaxy of the Milky Way located 163,000 light-years from Earth. Hubble scientists have nicknamed the image the "Cosmic Reef," because the large nebula "resembles part of a coral reef floating in a vast sea of stars," Hubble officials said in a statement.
Happy birthday, Hubble! To celebrate the 30th anniversary of the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope, NASA released this new image of a "cosmic undersea world" that is teeming with stars and colorful clouds of interstellar dust and gas. The image features the giant red nebula NGC 2014 and its smaller blue companion NGC 2020, both located in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small satellite galaxy of the Milky Way located 163,000 light-years from Earth. Hubble scientists have nicknamed the image the "Cosmic Reef," because the large nebula "resembles part of a coral reef floating in a vast sea of stars," Hubble officials said in a statement.

Friday, April 24, 2020: Happy birthday, Hubble! To celebrate the 30th anniversary of the launch of the Hubble Space Telescope, NASA released this new image of a "cosmic undersea world" that is teeming with stars and colorful clouds of interstellar dust and gas. The image features the giant red nebula NGC 2014 and its smaller blue companion NGC 2020, both located in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small satellite galaxy of the Milky Way located 163,000 light-years from Earth. Hubble scientists have nicknamed the image the "Cosmic Reef," because the large nebula "resembles part of a coral reef floating in a vast sea of stars," Hubble officials said in a statement. — Hanneke Weitering
 

A Lyrid meteor and the Milky Way

A Lyrid meteor crosses the Milky Way galaxy in this photo taken by Tina Pappas Lee on Fripp Island, South Carolina. The photo was taken at approximately 4:45 a.m. local time on April 22, 2020.
A Lyrid meteor crosses the Milky Way galaxy in this photo taken by Tina Pappas Lee on Fripp Island, South Carolina. The photo was taken at approximately 4:45 a.m. local time on April 22, 2020.

Thursday, April 23, 2020: A "shooting star" crosses the Milky Way galaxy in this photo taken during the peak of the annual Lyrid meteor shower. Photographer Tina Pappas Lee captured this view from Fripp Island, South Carolina, on Wednesday (April 22) at approximately 4:45 a.m. local time. Directly below the meteor, two of the brightest planets in the night sky, Jupiter and Saturn, are visible side by side. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Apollo 16's "Earthrise"

This stunning view of Earth rising above the lunar horizon was captured by NASA's Apollo 16 crew shortly before they landed on the moon 48 years ago. The astronauts snapped this picture, which appears to have been inspired by Apollo 13's famous "Earthrise" photo, on April 20, 1972, the same day the lunar module Orion touched down on the surface with NASA astronauts John Young, Apollo 16 commander, and lunar module pilot Charlie Duke. Command module pilot Ken Mattingly stayed in orbit during their 71-hour stay on on the surface.
This stunning view of Earth rising above the lunar horizon was captured by NASA's Apollo 16 crew shortly before they landed on the moon 48 years ago. The astronauts snapped this picture, which appears to have been inspired by Apollo 13's famous "Earthrise" photo, on April 20, 1972, the same day the lunar module Orion touched down on the surface with NASA astronauts John Young, Apollo 16 commander, and lunar module pilot Charlie Duke. Command module pilot Ken Mattingly stayed in orbit during their 71-hour stay on on the surface.

Wednesday, April 22, 2020: Happy Earth Day from space! This stunning view of Earth rising above the lunar horizon was captured by NASA's Apollo 16 crew shortly before they landed on the moon 48 years ago. The astronauts snapped this picture, which appears to have been inspired by Apollo 13's famous "Earthrise" photo, on April 20, 1972, the same day the lunar module Orion touched down on the surface with NASA astronauts John Young, Apollo 16 commander, and lunar module pilot Charlie Duke. Command module pilot Ken Mattingly stayed in orbit during their 71-hour stay on on the surface. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Starlink satellites spotted from space

A chain of SpaceX's Starlink internet satellites orbits over Earth in this photo captured by an astronaut at the International Space Station. The tiny satellite trails were captured on Monday (April 20) at 5:25 p.m. EDT (2125 GMT), as the station was passing over the southern Indian Ocean at an altitude of about 231 nautical miles (428 kilometers), NASA said in an image description. The satellites pictured here appear to belong to the fifth batch of approximately 60 satellites that SpaceX has launched for its new Starlink constellation, according to Jonathan McDowell, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics who avidly tracks objects in Earth's orbit.
A chain of SpaceX's Starlink internet satellites orbits over Earth in this photo captured by an astronaut at the International Space Station. The tiny satellite trails were captured on Monday (April 20) at 5:25 p.m. EDT (2125 GMT), as the station was passing over the southern Indian Ocean at an altitude of about 231 nautical miles (428 kilometers), NASA said in an image description. The satellites pictured here appear to belong to the fifth batch of approximately 60 satellites that SpaceX has launched for its new Starlink constellation, according to Jonathan McDowell, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics who avidly tracks objects in Earth's orbit.

Tuesday, April 21, 2020: A chain of SpaceX's Starlink internet satellites orbits over Earth's lime-green auroras in this photo captured by an astronaut at the International Space Station. The tiny satellite trails were captured on Monday (April 13) at 5:25 p.m. EDT (2125 GMT), as the station was passing over the southern Indian Ocean at an altitude of about 231 nautical miles (428 kilometers), NASA said in an image description. The satellites pictured here appear to belong to the fifth batch of approximately 60 satellites that SpaceX has launched for its new Starlink constellation, according to Jonathan McDowell, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics who avidly tracks objects in Earth's orbit. The company plans to launch its seventh batch of satellites on Wednesday (April 22). — Hanneke Weitering

Related: No, they're not aliens — SpaceX's Starlink satellites surprise British skywatchers
 

Meteor and the Milky Way over La Silla

A "shooting star" streaks through the night sky near the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, two of Earth's galactic neighbors, in this photo from the La Silla Observatory in Chile. In the foreground of the image are two of the three new ExTrA (Exoplanets in Transits and their Atmospheres) telescopes at the observatory.
A "shooting star" streaks through the night sky near the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, two of Earth's galactic neighbors, in this photo from the La Silla Observatory in Chile. In the foreground of the image are two of the three new ExTrA (Exoplanets in Transits and their Atmospheres) telescopes at the observatory.

Monday, April 20, 2020: A "shooting star" streaks through the night sky near the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, two of Earth's galactic neighbors, in this photo from the La Silla Observatory in Chile. In the foreground of the image are two of the three new ExTrA (Exoplanets in Transits and their Atmospheres) telescopes at the observatory. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Space station crew returns to Earth

The Soyuz MS-15 spacecraft carrying three astronauts back from the International Space Station parachutes down to Earth before landing in Kazakhstan. NASA astronauts Jessica Meir and Drew Morgan and their Russian crewmember Oleg Skripochka of Roscosmos safely touched down today (April 17) at 1:16:43 a.m. EDT (0516 GMT or 11:16 a.m. local Kazakh time), southeast of the town of Dzhezkazgan.
The Soyuz MS-15 spacecraft carrying three astronauts back from the International Space Station parachutes down to Earth before landing in Kazakhstan. NASA astronauts Jessica Meir and Drew Morgan and their Russian crewmember Oleg Skripochka of Roscosmos safely touched down today (April 17) at 1:16:43 a.m. EDT (0516 GMT or 11:16 a.m. local Kazakh time), southeast of the town of Dzhezkazgan.

Friday, April 17, 2020: The Soyuz MS-15 spacecraft carrying three astronauts back from the International Space Station parachutes down to Earth before landing in Kazakhstan. NASA astronauts Jessica Meir and Drew Morgan and their Russian crewmember Oleg Skripochka of Roscosmos safely touched down today at 1:16:43 a.m. EDT (0516 GMT or 11:16 a.m. local Kazakh time), southeast of the town of Dzhezkazgan. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Hubble eyes a multiring galaxy

The Hubble Space Telescope has captured this new view of a peculiar spiral galaxy with rings within its winding galactic arms. Known as NGC 2273, this galaxy is officially designated as a barred spiral, meaning that it has a central bar of stars and pinwheeling arms. But this galaxy also has several ring structures within its spiral arms. NGC 2273 hosts one inner ring along with two outer "pseudorings." Astronomers believe these rings were created by spiral arms appearing to wind up tightly into a closed loop.
The Hubble Space Telescope has captured this new view of a peculiar spiral galaxy with rings within its winding galactic arms. Known as NGC 2273, this galaxy is officially designated as a barred spiral, meaning that it has a central bar of stars and pinwheeling arms. But this galaxy also has several ring structures within its spiral arms. NGC 2273 hosts one inner ring along with two outer "pseudorings." Astronomers believe these rings were created by spiral arms appearing to wind up tightly into a closed loop.

Thursday, April 16, 2020: The Hubble Space Telescope has captured this new view of a peculiar spiral galaxy with rings within its winding galactic arms. Known as NGC 2273, this galaxy is officially designated as a barred spiral, meaning that it has a central bar of stars and pinwheeling arms. But this galaxy also has several ring structures within its spiral arms. NGC 2273 hosts one inner ring along with two outer "pseudorings." Astronomers believe these rings were created by spiral arms appearing to wind up tightly into a closed loop. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Soyuz approaches the space station

Earth's fluffy clouds and blue horizon provide a gorgeous backdrop for the Soyuz MS-16 crew spacecraft, seen here approaching the International Space Station with three Expedition 63 crewmembers on board. The Soyuz arrived at the orbiting lab on Thursday (April 9) with NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy and Russian cosmonauts Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner. An astronaut at the International Space Station captured this image from approximately 250 miles (400 kilometers) above the Pacific Ocean, near the coast of Peru.
Earth's fluffy clouds and blue horizon provide a gorgeous backdrop for the Soyuz MS-16 crew spacecraft, seen here approaching the International Space Station with three Expedition 63 crewmembers on board. The Soyuz arrived at the orbiting lab on Thursday (April 9) with NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy and Russian cosmonauts Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner. An astronaut at the International Space Station captured this image from approximately 250 miles (400 kilometers) above the Pacific Ocean, near the coast of Peru.

Wednesday, April 15, 2020: Earth's fluffy clouds and blue horizon provide a gorgeous backdrop for the Soyuz MS-16 crew spacecraft, seen here approaching the International Space Station with three Expedition 63 crewmembers on board. The Soyuz arrived at the orbiting lab on Thursday (April 9) with NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy and Russian cosmonauts Anatoly Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner. An astronaut at the International Space Station captured this image from approximately 250 miles (400 kilometers) above the Pacific Ocean, near the coast of Peru. — Hanneke Weitering

A shimmering dance

An astronaut on the International Space Station captured this image of the aurora australis over the Indian Ocean on April 8, 2020.
An astronaut on the International Space Station captured this image of the aurora australis over the Indian Ocean on April 8, 2020.

Tuesday, April 14, 2020: An astronaut on the International Space Station captured this image of the aurora australis over the Indian Ocean on April 8, 2020. At the time, the space station was near the southernmost point in its orbit, and preparing for the arrival of three new crewmembers. — Meghan Bartels
 

Goodbye, Earth!

BepiColombo's last picture of Earth, captured on April 11, 2020, before the spacecraft headed deeper into the solar system. The probe will begin orbiting Mercury in December 2025.
BepiColombo's last picture of Earth, captured on April 11, 2020, before the spacecraft headed deeper into the solar system. The probe will begin orbiting Mercury in December 2025.

Monday, April 13, 2020: On April 10, the European-Japanese spacecraft BepiColombo conducted a flyby of Earth, which slowed the probe's speed enough to turn its trajectory toward the inner solar system. The next day, the spacecraft took its final image of Earth, a delicate bright crescent in the vastness of space. — Meghan Bartels
 

The day before launch

Apollo 13 astronauts Jack Swigert, Jim Lovell and Fred Haise seen with a model of their capsule on April 10, 1970, the day before they launched.
Apollo 13 astronauts Jack Swigert, Jim Lovell and Fred Haise seen with a model of their capsule on April 10, 1970, the day before they launched.

Friday, April 10, 2020: Fifty years ago today, NASA astronauts Jack Swigert, Jim Lovell and Fred Haise posed with a model of the spacecraft they would launch on the next day for the mission dubbed Apollo 13. The flight was plagued with challenges even before launch, and the crew would experience a catastrophic explosion in the mission's service module, but all three returned to Earth safely. — Meghan Bartels
 

Expedition 63 lifts off 

A Russian Soyuz rocket soars toward the International Space Station with three Expedition 63 crewmembers after lifting off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan today (April 9) at 4:05 a.m. EDT (0805 GMT or 1:05 p.m. local Kazakh time). The Soyuz MS-16 crew capsule safely arrived at the orbiting laboratory about six hours later, with NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy and Russian cosmonauts Anatoli Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner on board.
A Russian Soyuz rocket soars toward the International Space Station with three Expedition 63 crewmembers after lifting off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan today (April 9) at 4:05 a.m. EDT (0805 GMT or 1:05 p.m. local Kazakh time). The Soyuz MS-16 crew capsule safely arrived at the orbiting laboratory about six hours later, with NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy and Russian cosmonauts Anatoli Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner on board.

Thursday, April 9, 2020: A Russian Soyuz rocket soars toward the International Space Station with three Expedition 63 crewmembers after lifting off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan today (April 9) at 4:05 a.m. EDT (0805 GMT or 1:05 p.m. local Kazakh time). The Soyuz MS-16 crew capsule safely arrived at the orbiting laboratory about six hours later, with NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy and Russian cosmonauts Anatoli Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner on board. — Hanneke Weitering
 

"Pink Moon" seen from space

The nearly-full Pink Moon rises over a cloud-covered Earth in this photo taken by an astronaut at the International Space Station on April 6, 2020.
The nearly-full Pink Moon rises over a cloud-covered Earth in this photo taken by an astronaut at the International Space Station on April 6, 2020.

Wednesday, April 8, 2020: The nearly-full Pink Moon rises over a cloud-covered Earth in this photo taken by an astronaut at the International Space Station. This photo was taken on Monday (April 6), one day before the supermoon, or a full moon that coincides with the moon's perigee, the closest point to Earth in its orbit. Because the full moon of April is traditionally called the Pink Moon, last night's supermoon has been referred to as the "Super Pink Moon." — Hanneke Weitering
 

Juno spots hazy clouds on Jupiter

Hazy clouds streak across Jupiter's northern hemisphere in this new image from NASA's Juno spacecraft. These long, thin cloud bands consist of haze particles that drift above the planet's underlying cloud features. While the cause of these wispy clouds is still a bit of a mystery, scientists believe the hazy features could be related to Jupiter's jet streams. "Two jet streams in Jupiter's atmosphere flank either side of the region where the narrow bands of haze typically appear, and some researchers speculate those jet streams may influence the formation of the high hazes," NASA officials said in a statement. The Juno orbiter captured this image during its 25th close flyby of Jupiter, also known as a perijove, on Feb. 17 at 12:29 p.m. EST (1729 GMT), when the spacecraft was about 15,610 miles (25,120 kilometers) from the planet's cloud tops.
Hazy clouds streak across Jupiter's northern hemisphere in this new image from NASA's Juno spacecraft. These long, thin cloud bands consist of haze particles that drift above the planet's underlying cloud features. While the cause of these wispy clouds is still a bit of a mystery, scientists believe the hazy features could be related to Jupiter's jet streams. "Two jet streams in Jupiter's atmosphere flank either side of the region where the narrow bands of haze typically appear, and some researchers speculate those jet streams may influence the formation of the high hazes," NASA officials said in a statement. The Juno orbiter captured this image during its 25th close flyby of Jupiter, also known as a perijove, on Feb. 17 at 12:29 p.m. EST (1729 GMT), when the spacecraft was about 15,610 miles (25,120 kilometers) from the planet's cloud tops.

Tuesday, April 7, 2020: Hazy clouds streak across Jupiter's northern hemisphere in this new image from NASA's Juno spacecraft. These long, thin cloud bands consist of haze particles that drift above the planet's underlying cloud features. While the cause of these wispy clouds is still a bit of a mystery, scientists believe the hazy features could be related to Jupiter's jet streams. "Two jet streams in Jupiter's atmosphere flank either side of the region where the narrow bands of haze typically appear, and some researchers speculate those jet streams may influence the formation of the high hazes," NASA officials said in a statement. T

he Juno orbiter captured this image during its 25th close flyby of Jupiter, also known as a perijove, on Feb. 17 at 12:29 p.m. EST (1729 GMT), when the spacecraft was about 15,610 miles (25,120 kilometers) from the planet's cloud tops. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Two Saturnian moons 

Saturn's moons Rhea and Janus tango on opposite sides of the planet's famous ring system in this new color-enhanced image from NASA's Cassini orbiter. Rhea, Saturn's second-largest moon, is visible in the foreground, while the smaller moon Janus is pictured in the distance across the rings. Citizen scientist Kevin Gill recently processed this 10-year-old view of Saturn and two of its moons using calibrated red, green and blue filtered images captured by the Cassini spacecraft on March 28, 2010.
Saturn's moons Rhea and Janus tango on opposite sides of the planet's famous ring system in this new color-enhanced image from NASA's Cassini orbiter. Rhea, Saturn's second-largest moon, is visible in the foreground, while the smaller moon Janus is pictured in the distance across the rings. Citizen scientist Kevin Gill recently processed this 10-year-old view of Saturn and two of its moons using calibrated red, green and blue filtered images captured by the Cassini spacecraft on March 28, 2010.

Monday, April 6, 2020: Saturn's moons Rhea and Janus tango on opposite sides of the planet's famous ring system in this new color-enhanced image from NASA's Cassini orbiter. Rhea, Saturn's second-largest moon, is visible in the foreground, while the smaller moon Janus is pictured in the distance across the rings. Citizen scientist Kevin Gill recently processed this 10-year-old view of Saturn and two of its moons using calibrated red, green and blue filtered images captured by the Cassini spacecraft on March 28, 2010. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Hubble eyes a one-arm spiral galaxy 

A new Hubble Space Telescope image reveals the peculiar structure of a spiral galaxy with only one starry arm rotating about its center. While most barred spiral galaxies are characterized by a distinct bar-shaped structure of stars centered on a galactic core, this barred spiral isn't like most others. Located 21 million light-years from Earth, this strange galaxy, known as NGC 4618, was first thought to be a star cluster after the astronomer William Herschel discovered it in 1787. Astronomers now think that gravitational interactions with a neighboring galaxy may have influenced this galaxy's shape.
A new Hubble Space Telescope image reveals the peculiar structure of a spiral galaxy with only one starry arm rotating about its center. While most barred spiral galaxies are characterized by a distinct bar-shaped structure of stars centered on a galactic core, this barred spiral isn't like most others. Located 21 million light-years from Earth, this strange galaxy, known as NGC 4618, was first thought to be a star cluster after the astronomer William Herschel discovered it in 1787. Astronomers now think that gravitational interactions with a neighboring galaxy may have influenced this galaxy's shape.

Friday, April 3, 2020: A new Hubble Space Telescope image reveals the peculiar structure of a spiral galaxy with only one starry arm rotating about its center. While most barred spiral galaxies are characterized by a distinct bar-shaped structure of stars centered on a galactic core, this barred spiral isn't like most others. Located 21 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Canes Venatici, this strange galaxy, known as NGC 4618, was first thought to be a star cluster when the astronomer William Herschel discovered it in 1787. Astronomers now think that gravitational interactions with a neighboring galaxy may have influenced this galaxy's shape. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Venus meets the Pleiades

Thursday, April 2, 2020: The bright planet Venus begins its trek past the Pleiades star cluster, also known as the "Seven Sisters," in this photo taken by astrophysicist Gianluca Masi of the Virtual Telescope Project in Italy on Wednesday (April 1). Venus, which reaches its greatest brightness of the year at the end of the month, will make a close approach to the Pleiades tomorrow (April 3), when the two objects will be in conjunction — meaning they share the same celestial longitude — for the first time in 8 years. During the conjunction, Venus will be just one-quarter of a degree southeast of Alcyone, the brightest star in the cluster. Look for the pair in the western evening sky. You can also watch a live stream of the encounter from the Virtual Telescope Project here, starting at 1:30 p.m. EDT (1730 GMT). — Hanneke Weitering
 

Webb telescope deploys its mirrors

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope has successfully deployed its giant primary mirror, putting the new observatory one big step closer to being ready for launch in 2021. The entire 256-inch (6.5 meters) primary mirror assembly unfurled into the same configuration that it would be after deploying in space. This critical test took place in early March, right before NASA's centers shut down due to the coronavirus pandemic. Work on the Webb telescope was temporarily halted on March 20.
NASA's James Webb Space Telescope has successfully deployed its giant primary mirror, putting the new observatory one big step closer to being ready for launch in 2021. The entire 256-inch (6.5 meters) primary mirror assembly unfurled into the same configuration that it would be after deploying in space. This critical test took place in early March, right before NASA's centers shut down due to the coronavirus pandemic. Work on the Webb telescope was temporarily halted on March 20.

Wednesday, April 1, 2020: NASA's James Webb Space Telescope has successfully deployed its giant primary mirror, putting the new observatory one big step closer to being ready for launch in 2021. The entire 256-inch (6.5 meters) primary mirror assembly unfurled into the same configuration that it would be after deploying in space. This critical test took place in early March, right before NASA's centers shut down due to the coronavirus pandemic. Work on the Webb telescope was temporarily halted on March 20. It is scheduled to launch in March 2021, though even before the coronavirus pandemic, that date was expected to slip. — Hanneke Weitering
 

A "fluffy" spiral galaxy

While most spiral galaxies have clearly defined arms the twist around a galactic core, others have patchy spiral arms that are not clearly distinguishable and resemble cotton wool. Due to this wooly appearance, the galaxy NGC 4237, shown here in a new image from the Hubble Space Telescope, is classified as a "flocculent" spiral galaxy. Located 60 million light-years from Earth in the constellation of Coma Berenices, or "Berenice's Hair," NGC 4237 has been a target for astronomers, not because of its fluffy appearance, but because its bright central region may bear clues about how supermassive black holes form inside galaxies.
While most spiral galaxies have clearly defined arms the twist around a galactic core, others have patchy spiral arms that are not clearly distinguishable and resemble cotton wool. Due to this wooly appearance, the galaxy NGC 4237, shown here in a new image from the Hubble Space Telescope, is classified as a "flocculent" spiral galaxy. Located 60 million light-years from Earth in the constellation of Coma Berenices, or "Berenice's Hair," NGC 4237 has been a target for astronomers, not because of its fluffy appearance, but because its bright central region may bear clues about how supermassive black holes form inside galaxies.

Tuesday, March 31, 2020: While most spiral galaxies have clearly defined arms the twist around a galactic core, others have patchy spiral arms that are not clearly distinguishable and resemble cotton wool. Due to this wooly appearance, the galaxy NGC 4237, shown here in a new image from the Hubble Space Telescope, is classified as a "flocculent" spiral galaxy. Located 60 million light-years from Earth in the constellation of Coma Berenices, or "Berenice's Hair," NGC 4237 has been a target for astronomers, not because of its fluffy appearance, but because its bright central region may bear clues about how supermassive black holes form inside galaxies. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Airglow shines over Malaysia and Indonesia

City lights of Malaysia and Indonesia light up the Earth beneath a blanket of blue and orange airglow while boat lights glow in the Bay of Bengal in this nighttime view of Earth from space. An Expedition 62 astronaut captured this photo from the International Space Station on March 21, when the space station was orbiting 262 miles (422 kilometers) overhead.
City lights of Malaysia and Indonesia light up the Earth beneath a blanket of blue and orange airglow while boat lights glow in the Bay of Bengal in this nighttime view of Earth from space. An Expedition 62 astronaut captured this photo from the International Space Station on March 21, when the space station was orbiting 262 miles (422 kilometers) overhead.

Monday, March 30, 2020: City lights of Malaysia and Indonesia light up the Earth beneath a blanket of blue and orange airglow while boat lights glow in the Bay of Bengal in this nighttime view of Earth from space. An Expedition 62 astronaut captured this photo from the International Space Station on March 21, when the space station was orbiting 262 miles (422 kilometers) overhead. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Comet Atlas blazes through the night sky

Image 1 of 2

Comet C/2019 Y4 Atlas is slowly brightening in the night sky as it gets ready to swing around the sun in a couple months. Astrophotographer Mike Cuffe captured these two images of the green comet through his backyard telescope on Monday (March 23). In the first stacked image, the comet appears a bit blurry as it moves across a fixed background of stars. For the second image, the telescope was fixed on the comet, so the background stars appear as short trails behind a sharper image of the comet. Comet C/2019 Y4 Atlas is expected to make its closest approach to Earth on May 23, about one week before it reaches perihelion, or its closest point to the sun. It will brighten dramatically during this approach, and it may become visible to the naked eye in late April or May.
Comet C/2019 Y4 Atlas is slowly brightening in the night sky as it gets ready to swing around the sun in a couple months. Astrophotographer Mike Cuffe captured these two images of the green comet through his backyard telescope on Monday (March 23). In the first stacked image, the comet appears a bit blurry as it moves across a fixed background of stars. For the second image, the telescope was fixed on the comet, so the background stars appear as short trails behind a sharper image of the comet. Comet C/2019 Y4 Atlas is expected to make its closest approach to Earth on May 23, about one week before it reaches perihelion, or its closest point to the sun. It will brighten dramatically during this approach, and it may become visible to the naked eye in late April or May.

Image 2 of 2

Comet C/2019 Y4 Atlas is slowly brightening in the night sky as it gets ready to swing around the sun in a couple months. Astrophotographer Mike Cuffe captured these two images of the green comet through his backyard telescope on Monday (March 23). In the first stacked image, the comet appears a bit blurry as it moves across a fixed background of stars. For the second image, the telescope was fixed on the comet, so the background stars appear as short trails behind a sharper image of the comet. Comet C/2019 Y4 Atlas is expected to make its closest approach to Earth on May 23, about one week before it reaches perihelion, or its closest point to the sun. It will brighten dramatically during this approach, and it may become visible to the naked eye in late April or May.
Comet C/2019 Y4 Atlas is slowly brightening in the night sky as it gets ready to swing around the sun in a couple months. Astrophotographer Mike Cuffe captured these two images of the green comet through his backyard telescope on Monday (March 23). In the first stacked image, the comet appears a bit blurry as it moves across a fixed background of stars. For the second image, the telescope was fixed on the comet, so the background stars appear as short trails behind a sharper image of the comet. Comet C/2019 Y4 Atlas is expected to make its closest approach to Earth on May 23, about one week before it reaches perihelion, or its closest point to the sun. It will brighten dramatically during this approach, and it may become visible to the naked eye in late April or May.

Friday, March 27, 2020: Comet C/2019 Y4 Atlas is slowly brightening in the night sky as it gets ready to swing around the sun in a couple months. Astrophotographer Mike Cuffe captured these two images of the green comet through his backyard telescope on Monday (March 23). In the first stacked image, the comet appears a bit blurry as it moves across a fixed background of stars. For the second image, the telescope was fixed on the comet, so the background stars appear as short trails behind a sharper image of the comet. Comet C/2019 Y4 Atlas is expected to make its closest approach to Earth on May 23, about one week before it reaches perihelion, or its closest point to the sun. It will brighten dramatically during this approach, and it may become visible to the naked eye in late April or May. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Atlas V rocket stands ready for launch

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket stands ready for launch on Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The rocket is scheduled to launch the U.S. Space Force's sixth and final Advanced Extremely High Frequency satellite, or AEHF-6, on March 26, 2020.
A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket stands ready for launch on Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The rocket is scheduled to launch the U.S. Space Force's sixth and final Advanced Extremely High Frequency satellite, or AEHF-6, on March 26, 2020.

Thursday, March 26, 2020: A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket stands ready for launch on Space Launch Complex-41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The rocket is scheduled to launch the U.S. Space Force's sixth and final Advanced Extremely High Frequency satellite, or AEHF-6, today during a 2-hour launch window that opens at 2:57 p.m. EDT (1857 GMT). AEHF-6 will be the first national security mission for the Space Force, and this Atlas V will be the first rocket to launch bearing the Space Force's new logo. You can watch the launch live here. — Hanneke Weitering
 

VLT's Laser Guide Star

The European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT) beams its laser guide star into the night sky over Chile, creating a beam of light that arcs above the Milky Way galaxy. Astronomers use giant laser beams like these to help their telescopes correct for the distortion caused by turbulence in Earth's atmosphere, which can make stars appear to twinkle. For observations at the VLT, astronomers rely on the Laser Guide Star Facility at the Paranal Observatory in Chile. Pictured in the foreground are three domes of the SPECULOOS Southern Observatory.
The European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT) beams its laser guide star into the night sky over Chile, creating a beam of light that arcs above the Milky Way galaxy. Astronomers use giant laser beams like these to help their telescopes correct for the distortion caused by turbulence in Earth's atmosphere, which can make stars appear to twinkle. For observations at the VLT, astronomers rely on the Laser Guide Star Facility at the Paranal Observatory in Chile. Pictured in the foreground are three domes of the SPECULOOS Southern Observatory.

Wednesday, March 25, 2020: The European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT) beams its laser guide star into the night sky over Chile, creating a beam of light that arcs above the Milky Way galaxy. Astronomers use giant laser beams like these to help their telescopes correct for the distortion caused by turbulence in Earth's atmosphere, which can make stars appear to twinkle. For observations at the VLT, astronomers rely on the Laser Guide Star Facility at the Paranal Observatory in Chile. Pictured in the foreground are four domes of the SPECULOOS Southern Observatory. — Hanneke Weitering

Orion and the USS John P. Murtha

NASA's Orion crew capsule floats behind the USS John P. Murtha in the Pacific Ocean after the landing and recovery crews from the Exploration Ground Systems team at the agency's Kennedy Space Center performed their first full mission profile test of recovery procedures for the Artemis 1 mission, on March 13, 2020. Scheduled to launch in the second half of 2021, the Artemis 1 mission will mark the first uncrewed test flight of NASA's Space Launch System megarocket and Orion spacecraft.
NASA's Orion crew capsule floats behind the USS John P. Murtha in the Pacific Ocean after the landing and recovery crews from the Exploration Ground Systems team at the agency's Kennedy Space Center performed their first full mission profile test of recovery procedures for the Artemis 1 mission, on March 13, 2020. Scheduled to launch in the second half of 2021, the Artemis 1 mission will mark the first uncrewed test flight of NASA's Space Launch System megarocket and Orion spacecraft.

Tuesday, March 24, 2020: NASA's Orion crew capsule floats behind the USS John P. Murtha in the Pacific Ocean after the landing and recovery crews from the Exploration Ground Systems team at the agency's Kennedy Space Center performed their first full mission profile test of recovery procedures for the Artemis 1 mission, on March 13. Scheduled to launch in the second half of 2021, the Artemis 1 mission will mark the first uncrewed test flight of NASA's Space Launch System megarocket and Orion spacecraft. After landing, air bags on top of the spacecraft will ensure that the capsule floats upright. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Curiosity snaps a selfie on Mars

NASA's Mars rover Curiosity snapped this selfie after drilling a hole at a rock feature called "Hutton" and making its way up to the Greenheugh Pediment, the rocky mound seen here behind the rover and to the left. This panorama combines 86 images taken by the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) camera on Curiosity's robotic arm on Feb. 26, 2020, the 2,687th Martian day, or "sol," of the rover's mission on the Red Planet.
NASA's Mars rover Curiosity snapped this selfie after drilling a hole at a rock feature called "Hutton" and making its way up to the Greenheugh Pediment, the rocky mound seen here behind the rover and to the left. This panorama combines 86 images taken by the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) camera on Curiosity's robotic arm on Feb. 26, 2020, the 2,687th Martian day, or "sol," of the rover's mission on the Red Planet.

Monday, March 23, 2020: NASA's Mars rover Curiosity snapped this selfie after drilling a hole at a rock feature called "Hutton" and making its way up to the Greenheugh Pediment, the rocky mound seen here behind the rover and to the left. This panorama combines 86 images taken by the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) camera on Curiosity's robotic arm on Feb. 26, the 2,687th Martian day, or "sol," of the rover's mission on the Red Planet. You can see an annotated version of this image here. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Auroras and airglow over Earth

Green auroras clash with orange airglow in this stunning view of Earth from the International Space Station. An Expedition 62 crewmember captured this photo from 263 miles (423 kilometers) above the Earth as the space station passed over Kazakhstan on March 17, 2020.
Green auroras clash with orange airglow in this stunning view of Earth from the International Space Station. An Expedition 62 crewmember captured this photo from 263 miles (423 kilometers) above the Earth as the space station passed over Kazakhstan on March 17, 2020.

Friday, March 20, 2020: Green auroras clash with orange airglow in this stunning view of Earth from the International Space Station. An Expedition 62 crewmember captured this photo from 263 miles (423 kilometers) above the Earth as the space station passed over Kazakhstan on Tuesday (March 17). Three weeks from now, three new space station crewmembers are scheduled to launch from Kazakhstan to the orbiting laboratory. NASA astronaut Chris Cassidy and two Russian cosmonauts, Anatoli Ivanishin and Ivan Vagner, lift off on a Soyuz rocket April 9. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Milky Way over ELT

In this stunning night sky photo, the full arc of the Milky Way galaxy glitters over a photographer's shadow at the construction site for the European Southern Observatory's Extremely Large Telescope (ELT), on the Chilean mountain Cerro Armazones. Scheduled to open in 2025, ELT will be "the world’s biggest eye on the sky," with a 39-meter (128-foot) primary mirror. ELT will scan the skies in optical and near-infrared wavelengths of light to search for worlds beyond our solar system, particularly for potentially Earth-like exoplanets. It will also help astronomers study how planets, stars, galaxies and black holes formed in the early universe.
In this stunning night sky photo, the full arc of the Milky Way galaxy glitters over a photographer's shadow at the construction site for the European Southern Observatory's Extremely Large Telescope (ELT), on the Chilean mountain Cerro Armazones. Scheduled to open in 2025, ELT will be "the world’s biggest eye on the sky," with a 39-meter (128-foot) primary mirror. ELT will scan the skies in optical and near-infrared wavelengths of light to search for worlds beyond our solar system, particularly for potentially Earth-like exoplanets. It will also help astronomers study how planets, stars, galaxies and black holes formed in the early universe.

Thursday, March 19, 2020: In this stunning night sky photo, the full arc of the Milky Way galaxy glitters over a photographer's shadow at the construction site for the European Southern Observatory's Extremely Large Telescope (ELT), on the Chilean mountain Cerro Armazones. Scheduled to open in 2025, ELT will be "the world’s biggest eye on the sky," with a 39-meter (128-foot) primary mirror. ELT will scan the skies in optical and near-infrared wavelengths of light to search for worlds beyond our solar system, particularly for potentially Earth-like exoplanets. It will also help astronomers study how planets, stars, galaxies and black holes formed in the early universe. — Hanneke Weitering
 

A stellar nursery in the Tarantula Nebula

A new Hubble Space Telescope image features a stellar nursery on the outskirts of the Tarantula Nebula. Known as LHA 120-N 150, this bright pink space cloud is located more than 160,000 light-years away from Earth in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a dwarf galaxy that orbits the Milky Way. This colorful nebula is rich with new star formation, and it has an "exceptionally high concentration of massive stars, Hubble scientists said in a statement. By studying LHA 120-N 150, astronomers hope to learn more about the kind of environment in which massive stars form.
A new Hubble Space Telescope image features a stellar nursery on the outskirts of the Tarantula Nebula. Known as LHA 120-N 150, this bright pink space cloud is located more than 160,000 light-years away from Earth in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a dwarf galaxy that orbits the Milky Way. This colorful nebula is rich with new star formation, and it has an "exceptionally high concentration of massive stars, Hubble scientists said in a statement. By studying LHA 120-N 150, astronomers hope to learn more about the kind of environment in which massive stars form.

Wednesday, March 18, 2020: A new Hubble Space Telescope image features a stellar nursery on the outskirts of the Tarantula Nebula. Known as LHA 120-N 150, this bright pink space cloud is located more than 160,000 light-years away from Earth in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a dwarf galaxy that orbits the Milky Way. This colorful nebula is rich with new star formation, and it has an "exceptionally high concentration of massive stars, Hubble scientists said in a statement. By studying LHA 120-N 150, astronomers hope to learn more about the kind of environment in which massive stars form. — Hanneke Weitering

Happy St. Patrick's Day from space!

To honor St. Patrick's day at the International Space Station on March 17, 2020, NASA astronaut Andrew Morgan tweeted this photo of an Irish flag floating in one of the windows of the Cupola observatory in the orbiting lab. One of the space station's solar arrays is visible through the window, while Earth provides a cloudy backdrop. Along with this photo of the flag, Morgan tweeted a photo of Ireland, also known as the Emerald Isle, that he captured from the space station.
To honor St. Patrick's day at the International Space Station on March 17, 2020, NASA astronaut Andrew Morgan tweeted this photo of an Irish flag floating in one of the windows of the Cupola observatory in the orbiting lab. One of the space station's solar arrays is visible through the window, while Earth provides a cloudy backdrop. Along with this photo of the flag, Morgan tweeted a photo of Ireland, also known as the Emerald Isle, that he captured from the space station.

Tuesday, March 17, 2020: To honor St. Patrick's day at the International Space Station today, NASA astronaut Andrew Morgan tweeted this photo of an Irish flag floating in one of the windows of the Cupola observatory in the orbiting lab. One of the space station's solar arrays is visible through the window, while Earth provides a cloudy backdrop. Along with this photo of the flag, Morgan tweeted a photo of Ireland, also known as the Emerald Isle, that he captured from the space station. — Hanneke Weitering
 

U.S. Eastern Seaboard seen from space

A new view of Earth from the International Space Station features much of the Eastern Seaboard of the U.S., stretching from New York City to South Carolina. NASA astronaut Andrew Morgan shared the photo on Twitter last Thursday (March 12). In the foreground on the left side of the frame is Northrop Grumman's Cygnus NG-13 cargo resupply spacecraft, which arrived at the space station Feb. 18. On the right is a portion of the station's Canadarm2 robotic arm.
A new view of Earth from the International Space Station features much of the Eastern Seaboard of the U.S., stretching from New York City to South Carolina. NASA astronaut Andrew Morgan shared the photo on Twitter last Thursday (March 12). In the foreground on the left side of the frame is Northrop Grumman's Cygnus NG-13 cargo resupply spacecraft, which arrived at the space station Feb. 18. On the right is a portion of the station's Canadarm2 robotic arm.

Monday, March 16, 2020: A new view of Earth from the International Space Station features much of the Eastern Seaboard of the U.S., stretching from New York City to South Carolina. NASA astronaut Andrew Morgan shared the photo on Twitter last Thursday (March 12). In the foreground on the left side of the frame is Northrop Grumman's Cygnus NG-13 cargo resupply spacecraft, which arrived at the space station Feb. 18. On the right is a portion of the station's Canadarm2 robotic arm. — Hanneke Weitering
 

A galaxy with "hunger pangs"

A new Hubble Space Telescope image of the spiral galaxy NGC 1589 reveals the galaxy's bright central bulge, where a supermassive black hole is lurking in a group of tightly packed stars. The galaxy "was once the scene of a violent bout of cosmic hunger pangs," Hubble astronomers said in a statement. Located 168 million light-years from Earth in the Taurus constellation, NGC 1589 was discovered by William Herschel in 1783. "As astronomers looked on, a poor, hapless star was seemingly torn apart and devoured by the ravenous supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy," the Hubble team said. Now astronomers are using Hubble to look for any evidence of stellar debris that was ejected when the star was torn apart.
A new Hubble Space Telescope image of the spiral galaxy NGC 1589 reveals the galaxy's bright central bulge, where a supermassive black hole is lurking in a group of tightly packed stars. The galaxy "was once the scene of a violent bout of cosmic hunger pangs," Hubble astronomers said in a statement. Located 168 million light-years from Earth in the Taurus constellation, NGC 1589 was discovered by William Herschel in 1783. "As astronomers looked on, a poor, hapless star was seemingly torn apart and devoured by the ravenous supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy," the Hubble team said. Now astronomers are using Hubble to look for any evidence of stellar debris that was ejected when the star was torn apart.

Friday, March 13, 2020: A new Hubble Space Telescope image of the spiral galaxy NGC 1589 reveals the galaxy's bright central bulge, where a supermassive black hole is lurking in a group of tightly packed stars. The galaxy "was once the scene of a violent bout of cosmic hunger pangs," Hubble astronomers said in a statement

Located 168 million light-years from Earth in the Taurus constellation, NGC 1589 was discovered by William Herschel in 1783. "As astronomers looked on, a poor, hapless star was seemingly torn apart and devoured by the ravenous supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy," the Hubble team said. Now astronomers are using Hubble to look for any evidence of stellar debris that was ejected when the star ripped apart. — Hanneke Weitering
 

China's city lights seen from space

City lights illuminate southeast China by night in this photo taken by an astronaut at the International Space Station. The large, bright cluster of lights near the center of this image represent the city of Shanghai, the most highly populated city in the country, located on the coast of the East China Sea. The small, dense cluster just to the left of Shanghai is the city of Hefei, the capital of  Anhui and the largest city in that province of China. In the bottom left corner of the image is Wuhan, the capital of Hubei province and "ground zero" of the novel coronavirus outbreak. This photo was taken on March 5, 2020, as the International Space Station passed over the Asian continent at an altitude of about 259 miles (417 kilometers).
City lights illuminate southeast China by night in this photo taken by an astronaut at the International Space Station. The large, bright cluster of lights near the center of this image represent the city of Shanghai, the most highly populated city in the country, located on the coast of the East China Sea. The small, dense cluster just to the left of Shanghai is the city of Hefei, the capital of Anhui and the largest city in that province of China. In the bottom left corner of the image is Wuhan, the capital of Hubei province and "ground zero" of the novel coronavirus outbreak. This photo was taken on March 5, 2020, as the International Space Station passed over the Asian continent at an altitude of about 259 miles (417 kilometers).

Thursday, March 12, 2020: City lights illuminate southeast China by night in this photo taken by an astronaut at the International Space Station. The large, bright cluster of lights near the center of this image represent the city of Shanghai, the most highly populated city in the country, located on the coast of the East China Sea. The small, dense cluster just to the left of Shanghai is the city of Hefei, the capital of  Anhui and the largest city in that province of China. In the bottom left corner of the image is Wuhan, the capital of Hubei province and "ground zero" of the novel coronavirus outbreak. This photo was taken on March 5, as the International Space Station passed over the Asian continent at an altitude of about 259 miles (417 kilometers). — Hanneke Weitering

Related: Dramatic effect of coronavirus lockdowns seen from space
 

Milky Way sparkles over Yellowstone

The Milky Way shimmers over Yellowstone National Park in this starry night-sky photo by Chirag Upreti. This panorama combines 10 frames captured from the "Mound and Jupiter Terrace" at Mammoth Hot Springs, and it features an excellent view of the planet Jupiter, shining brightly to the right of the Milky Way while reflecting off the surface of the water below. Saturn is also visible in the photo, shining to the left of the Milky Way, directly above the asterism known as the Teapot.
The Milky Way shimmers over Yellowstone National Park in this starry night-sky photo by Chirag Upreti. This panorama combines 10 frames captured from the "Mound and Jupiter Terrace" at Mammoth Hot Springs, and it features an excellent view of the planet Jupiter, shining brightly to the right of the Milky Way while reflecting off the surface of the water below. Saturn is also visible in the photo, shining to the left of the Milky Way, directly above the asterism known as the Teapot.

Wednesday, March 11, 2020: The Milky Way shimmers over Yellowstone National Park in this starry night-sky photo by Chirag Upreti. This panorama combines 10 frames captured from the "Mound and Jupiter Terrace" at Mammoth Hot Springs, and it features an excellent view of the planet Jupiter, shining brightly to the right of the Milky Way while reflecting off the surface of the water below. Saturn is also visible in the photo, shining to the left of the Milky Way, directly above the asterism known as the Teapot

"The Dark Horse Nebula can be seen apparently jumping over the mound and to the right of Jupiter," Upreti told Space.com. "It was an amazing experience to witness the stars and the Milky Way, knowing you are standing over terrain dictated by the raw power of a supervolcano, an incredible place to feel the bond between Earth and the night sky." — Hanneke Weitering
 

"Super Worm Moon" rises over Washington

The first supermoon of the year peers through a blanket of clouds above the U.S. Capitol in Washington in this photo captured by NASA photographer Joel Kowsky on Monday (March 9). Also known as the "Worm Moon," the full moon of March nearly coincided with the moon's perigee, or the closest point to Earth in the moon's elliptical orbit. The moon was officially full on Monday at 1:48 p.m. EDT (1748 GMT), at it reached perigee almost 13 hours later, at 2:33 a.m. EDT (0633 GMT) today.
The first supermoon of the year peers through a blanket of clouds above the U.S. Capitol in Washington in this photo captured by NASA photographer Joel Kowsky on Monday (March 9). Also known as the "Worm Moon," the full moon of March nearly coincided with the moon's perigee, or the closest point to Earth in the moon's elliptical orbit. The moon was officially full on Monday at 1:48 p.m. EDT (1748 GMT), at it reached perigee almost 13 hours later, at 2:33 a.m. EDT (0633 GMT) today.

Tuesday, March 10, 2020: The first supermoon of the year peers through a blanket of clouds above the U.S. Capitol in Washington in this photo captured by NASA photographer Joel Kowsky on Monday (March 9). Also known as the "Worm Moon," the full moon of March nearly coincided with the moon's perigee, or the closest point to Earth in the moon's elliptical orbit. The moon was officially full on Monday at 1:48 p.m. EDT (1748 GMT), and it reached perigee almost 13 hours later, at 2:33 a.m. EDT (0633 GMT) today. — Hanneke Weitering
 

SpaceX's Dragon arrives at the space station

SpaceX's last Dragon cargo ship to be captured by a robotic arm is parked at the International Space Station's Harmony module on March 9, 2020.
SpaceX's last Dragon cargo ship to be captured by a robotic arm is parked at the International Space Station's Harmony module on March 9, 2020.

Monday, March 9, 2020: This Dragon cargo ship marked the end of an era of sorts for private spaceship builder SpaceX when it arrived at the International Space Station today. The Dragon CRS-20 spacecraft seen here is the last SpaceX Dragon to be captured by a robotic arm and attached to the station. Future SpaceX Dragon resupply flights will use the company's new Dragon 2 version, which can dock itself at the station. 

NASA astronaut Jessica Meir unveiled this photo on Twitter after using the station's robotic arm to capture the Dragon capsule. She wrote: "From now on, SpaceX will automatically dock to station. This Dragon capsule has been on station 2 times prior - sustainability is paramount to future space exploration."   — Tariq Malik
 

A weird crater on Mars

A new image from the European Space Agency's Mars Express orbiter reveals an odd, misshapen impact crater known as Moreux crater. While most craters appear roughly circular in shape, the outline of Moreux crater is shaped more like a fried egg. The crater's dark walls appear ridged and rippled, while dark brown and black dunes are smeared across the crater floor. The tall peak in its center is a pile of material that was ejected from the Martian terrain when the initial impact happened a few million years ago. Moreux crater's contorted appearance  developed over a long period of time, as erosion, wind and glacial activity shaped the planet's surface. This image was created using data collected by the High Resolution Stereo Camera on Mars Express, when the spacecraft flew over the area in October 2019.
A new image from the European Space Agency's Mars Express orbiter reveals an odd, misshapen impact crater known as Moreux crater. While most craters appear roughly circular in shape, the outline of Moreux crater is shaped more like a fried egg. The crater's dark walls appear ridged and rippled, while dark brown and black dunes are smeared across the crater floor. The tall peak in its center is a pile of material that was ejected from the Martian terrain when the initial impact happened a few million years ago. Moreux crater's contorted appearance developed over a long period of time, as erosion, wind and glacial activity shaped the planet's surface. This image was created using data collected by the High Resolution Stereo Camera on Mars Express, when the spacecraft flew over the area in October 2019.

Friday, March 6, 2020: A new image from the European Space Agency's Mars Express orbiter reveals an odd, misshapen impact crater on Mars known as Moreux crater. While most craters appear roughly circular in shape, the outline of Moreux crater is shaped more like a fried egg. The crater's dark walls appear ridged and rippled, while dark brown and black dunes are smeared across the crater floor. The tall peak in its center is a pile of material that was ejected from the Martian terrain when the initial impact happened a few million years ago. Moreux crater's contorted appearance  developed over a long period of time, as erosion, wind and glacial activity shaped the planet's surface. This image was created using data collected by the High Resolution Stereo Camera on Mars Express, when the spacecraft flew over the area in October 2019. — Hanneke Weitering
 

An astronaut's view of NYC

A new view of New York City captured from the International Space Station show's the city's skyline in incredible detail. NASA astronaut Jessica Meir photographed the city from the orbiting laboratory, which circles the Earth at an altitude of about 250 miles (400 kilometers). "Clear views of bustling #NYC day and night lately from @Space_Station," Meir tweeted on Wednesday (March 4). "Central Park looks inviting. Midtown's skyline reminds me of a metallic pin art impression."
A new view of New York City captured from the International Space Station show's the city's skyline in incredible detail. NASA astronaut Jessica Meir photographed the city from the orbiting laboratory, which circles the Earth at an altitude of about 250 miles (400 kilometers). "Clear views of bustling #NYC day and night lately from @Space_Station," Meir tweeted on Wednesday (March 4). "Central Park looks inviting. Midtown's skyline reminds me of a metallic pin art impression."

Thursday, March 5, 2020: A new view of New York City captured from the International Space Station show's the city's skyline in incredible detail. NASA astronaut Jessica Meir photographed the city from the orbiting laboratory, which circles the Earth at an altitude of about 250 miles (400 kilometers). "Clear views of bustling #NYC day and night lately from @Space_Station," Meir tweeted on Wednesday (March 4). "Central Park looks inviting. Midtown's skyline reminds me of a metallic pin art impression." — Hanneke Weitering
 

A portrait of Saturn's moon Enceladus

A new global view of Saturn's icy moon Enceladus shows the tiny satellite's "tiger stripe" fissures and frosty plumes in stunning detail. This artist's illustration of Enceladus was created from a global map that scientists working on NASA's Cassini mission stitched together from images that the spacecraft collected during its first 10 years of exploring the Saturn system.
A new global view of Saturn's icy moon Enceladus shows the tiny satellite's "tiger stripe" fissures and frosty plumes in stunning detail. This artist's illustration of Enceladus was created from a global map that scientists working on NASA's Cassini mission stitched together from images that the spacecraft collected during its first 10 years of exploring the Saturn system.

Wednesday, March 4, 2020: A new global view of Saturn's icy moon Enceladus shows the tiny satellite's "tiger stripe" fissures and frosty plumes in stunning detail. This artist's illustration of Enceladus was created from a global map that scientists working on NASA's Cassini mission stitched together from images that the spacecraft collected during its first 10 years of exploring the Saturn system. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Merging storms spotted on Jupiter

Two white, oval-shaped storms in Jupiter's atmosphere are now merging into one. NASA's Juno spacecraft caught these anticyclonic storms in the act using its JunoCam imager on Dec. 26, 2019, as the spacecraft was completing its 24th perijove, or close flyby of the planet. At the time, Juno was passing about 44,900 miles (72,200 kilometers) above Jupiter's cloud tops at a latitude of about 60 degrees south. NASA has been tracking the larger of the two merging storms for years, and scientists have watched it gobble up several smaller storms in the past, NASA said in a statement. It narrowly avoided a merger with this same storm just a few months before this image was captured, when the two made a close approach as they churned through the planet's turbulent atmosphere.
Two white, oval-shaped storms in Jupiter's atmosphere are now merging into one. NASA's Juno spacecraft caught these anticyclonic storms in the act using its JunoCam imager on Dec. 26, 2019, as the spacecraft was completing its 24th perijove, or close flyby of the planet. At the time, Juno was passing about 44,900 miles (72,200 kilometers) above Jupiter's cloud tops at a latitude of about 60 degrees south. NASA has been tracking the larger of the two merging storms for years, and scientists have watched it gobble up several smaller storms in the past, NASA said in a statement. It narrowly avoided a merger with this same storm just a few months before this image was captured, when the two made a close approach as they churned through the planet's turbulent atmosphere.

Tuesday, March 3, 2020: Two white, oval-shaped storms in Jupiter's atmosphere have been spotted merging into one. NASA's Juno spacecraft caught these anticyclonic storms in the act using its JunoCam imager on Dec. 26, 2019, as the spacecraft was completing its 24th perijove, or close flyby of the planet. At the time, Juno was passing about 44,900 miles (72,200 kilometers) above Jupiter's cloud tops at a latitude of about 60 degrees south. 

NASA has been tracking the larger of the two merging storms for years, and scientists have watched it gobble up several smaller storms in the past, NASA said in a statement. It narrowly avoided a merger with this same storm just a few months before this image was captured, when the two made a close approach as they churned through the planet's turbulent atmosphere. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Hubble spots a galactic "traffic jam"

A new image from the Hubble Space Telescope features the barred spiral galaxy NGC 3887, with its long, winding arms and bright galactic core. The German-English astronomer William Herschel discovered this galaxy, which is located 60 million light-years away from Earth, about 234 years ago.
A new image from the Hubble Space Telescope features the barred spiral galaxy NGC 3887, with its long, winding arms and bright galactic core. The German-English astronomer William Herschel discovered this galaxy, which is located 60 million light-years away from Earth, about 234 years ago.

Monday, March 2, 2020: A new image from the Hubble Space Telescope features the barred spiral galaxy NGC 3887, with its long, winding arms and bright galactic core. The German-English astronomer William Herschel discovered this galaxy, which is located 60 million light-years away from Earth, about 234 years ago. At the time, astronomers didn't understand how such spiral arms could even exist, because they thought a galaxy's spinning core would eventually wind them up so tightly that the spirals would disappear. It wasn't until the 1960s that astronomers came up with an explanation.

"Rather than behaving like rigid structures, spiral arms are in fact areas of greater density in a galaxy’s disc, with dynamics similar to those of a traffic jam," Hubble officials said in a statement. "The density of cars moving through a traffic jam increases at the center of the jam, where they move more slowly. Spiral arms function in a similar way; as gas and dust move through the density waves, they become compressed and linger, before moving out of them again." — Hanneke Weitering
 

Cubesat embarks on a fiery mission

The European Space Agency's Qarman cubesat deploys from the International Space Station on a mission to burn up in Earth's atmosphere to study the physics of its own fiery reentry. Officially titled the "QubeSat for Aerothermodynamic Research and Measurements on Ablation," Qarman was ejected from the space station's Nanoracks cubesat dispenser on Feb. 19, 2020.
The European Space Agency's Qarman cubesat deploys from the International Space Station on a mission to burn up in Earth's atmosphere to study the physics of its own fiery reentry. Officially titled the "QubeSat for Aerothermodynamic Research and Measurements on Ablation," Qarman was ejected from the space station's Nanoracks cubesat dispenser on Feb. 19, 2020.

Friday, February 28, 2020: The European Space Agency's Qarman cubesat deploys from the International Space Station on a mission to burn up in Earth's atmosphere to study the physics of its own fiery reentry. Officially titled the "QubeSat for Aerothermodynamic Research and Measurements on Ablation," Qarman was ejected from the space station's Nanoracks cubesat dispenser on Feb. 19.

"From there we think it will take about six months to reenter the atmosphere – to find out how accurately we can forecast Qarman's orbital decay is part of the reason we're flying the mission, relevant to the study of space debris," Olivier Chazot, head of the Aeronautic/Aerospace Department of the Von Karman Institute in Belgium, said in a statement. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Technicolor night sky 

The night sky above the European Southern Observatory's (ESO) Paranal Observatory in Chile is ablaze with vibrant airglow in this gorgeous view by astrophotographer Yuri Beletsky. This colorful phenomenon happens because atoms and molecules in Earth's atmosphere interact and emit radiation. For this reason, the sky is never completely dark. Airglow is only visible in places that are far enough from human-made light pollution, like the Paranal Observatory. This image was captured from ESO's Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA), and in the distance you can barely see the Very Large Telescope (VLT), which sits on top of Cerro Paranal.
The night sky above the European Southern Observatory's (ESO) Paranal Observatory in Chile is ablaze with vibrant airglow in this gorgeous view by astrophotographer Yuri Beletsky. This colorful phenomenon happens because atoms and molecules in Earth's atmosphere interact and emit radiation. For this reason, the sky is never completely dark. Airglow is only visible in places that are far enough from human-made light pollution, like the Paranal Observatory. This image was captured from ESO's Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA), and in the distance you can barely see the Very Large Telescope (VLT), which sits on top of Cerro Paranal.

Thursday, February 27, 2020: The night sky above the Paranal Observatory in Chile is ablaze with vibrant airglow in this gorgeous view by astrophotographer Yuri Beletsky. This colorful phenomenon happens because atoms and molecules in Earth's atmosphere interact and emit radiation. For this reason, the sky is never completely dark. Airglow is only visible in places that are far enough from human-made light pollution, like the Paranal Observatory. This image was captured from the European Southern Observatory's Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA), and in the distance you can barely see the Very Large Telescope (VLT), which sits on top of Cerro Paranal. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Tropical cyclones in the land Down Under

Tropical cyclones Ferdinand and Esther swirl over Australia in this satellite image from the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP weather satellite. This image combines data that Suomi NPP collected as it passed over Australia twice on Monday (Feb. 24). The diagonal line marks the edge of the swath between the two satellite passes, which occurred about 90 minutes apart. Esther made landfall near Queensland on Monday and has since been downgraded to a tropical storm. Ferdinand, seen here off the northwest coast of Australia, formed over the weekend and is now a Category 2 storm, but it is not expected to make landfall.
Tropical cyclones Ferdinand and Esther swirl over Australia in this satellite image from the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP weather satellite. This image combines data that Suomi NPP collected as it passed over Australia twice on Monday (Feb. 24). The diagonal line marks the edge of the swath between the two satellite passes, which occurred about 90 minutes apart. Esther made landfall near Queensland on Monday and has since been downgraded to a tropical storm. Ferdinand, seen here off the northwest coast of Australia, formed over the weekend and is now a Category 2 storm, but it is not expected to make landfall.

Wednesday, February 26, 2020: Tropical cyclones Ferdinand and Esther swirl over Australia in this satellite image from the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP weather satellite. This image combines data that Suomi NPP collected as it passed over Australia twice on Monday (Feb. 24). The diagonal line marks the edge of the swath between the two satellite passes, which occurred about 90 minutes apart. Esther made landfall near Queensland on Monday and has since been downgraded to a tropical depression. Ferdinand, seen here off the northwest coast of Australia, formed over the weekend and is now a Category 2 storm, but it is not expected to make landfall. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Orion spacecraft prepped for Artemis 1

NASA's Orion spacecraft is lifted into a thermal cage ahead of its move to to the vacuum testing chamber at NASA's Plum Brook testing station in Sandusky, Ohio. The spacecraft will fly on the Artemis 1 mission, an uncrewed test flight that will launch on NASA's new Space Launch System megarocket sometime in 2021. After that mission, NASA plans to use the Orion spacecraft to fly astronauts to the moon.
NASA's Orion spacecraft is lifted into a thermal cage ahead of its move to to the vacuum testing chamber at NASA's Plum Brook testing station in Sandusky, Ohio. The spacecraft will fly on the Artemis 1 mission, an uncrewed test flight that will launch on NASA's new Space Launch System megarocket sometime in 2021. After that mission, NASA plans to use the Orion spacecraft to fly astronauts to the moon.

Tuesday, February 25, 2020: NASA's Orion spacecraft is lifted into a thermal cage ahead of its move to to the vacuum testing chamber at NASA's Plum Brook testing station in Sandusky, Ohio. The spacecraft will fly on the Artemis 1 mission, an uncrewed test flight that will launch on NASA's new Space Launch System megarocket sometime in 2021. After that mission, NASA plans to use the Orion spacecraft to fly astronauts to the moon. — Hanneke Weitering
 

In Memoriam: Katherine Johnson

Famed NASA "hidden figure" and human computer Katherine Johnson celebrates her 98th birthday at the Virginia Air and Space Center at NASA's Langley Research Center in Virginia.
Famed NASA "hidden figure" and human computer Katherine Johnson celebrates her 98th birthday at the Virginia Air and Space Center at NASA's Langley Research Center in Virginia.

Monday, February 22, 2020: NASA mourned the loss of one of its science icons with the death of famed mathematician and "Hidden Figure" Katherine Johnson today at age 101. Johnson joined the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in 1953 as a so-called human computer at the agency's Langley, Virginia, office. There, she served in the West Area Computing section, an all-black unit in the segregated center, and stayed on in 1958 when NACA became NASA. 

Johnson's calculations as a human computer mapped the trajectory of astronaut Alan Shepard's historic 1961 spaceflight, when he became the first American in space, as well as for John Glenn's first orbital flight later that year. You can see our full remembrance here. -- Tariq Malik

The Sombrero Galaxy 

The Sombrero Galaxy may have a smooth "brim," suggesting that its past was free of any galactic collisions, but new data from the Hubble Space Telescope has shown that this seemingly unscathed galaxy is hiding a violent past. According to NASA, the galaxy's faint outer halo provides some forensic clues that suggest the galaxy underwent multiple collisions with other galaxies billions of years ago.
The Sombrero Galaxy may have a smooth "brim," suggesting that its past was free of any galactic collisions, but new data from the Hubble Space Telescope has shown that this seemingly unscathed galaxy is hiding a violent past. According to NASA, the galaxy's faint outer halo provides some forensic clues that suggest the galaxy underwent multiple collisions with other galaxies billions of years ago.

Friday, February 21, 2020: The Sombrero Galaxy may have a smooth "brim," suggesting that its past was free of any galactic collisions, but new data from the Hubble Space Telescope has shown that this seemingly unscathed galaxy is hiding a violent past. According to NASA, the galaxy's faint outer halo provides some forensic clues that suggest the galaxy underwent multiple collisions with other galaxies billions of years ago. 

"These latest observations of the Sombrero are turning conventional theory on its head, showing only a tiny fraction of older, metal-poor stars in the halo, plus an unexpected abundance of metal-rich stars typically found only in a galaxy's disk, and the central bulge," Hubble officials said in a statement. "Past major galaxy mergers are a possible explanation, though the stately Sombrero shows none of the messy evidence of a recent merger of massive galaxies." — Hanneke Weitering

Mars plays "peekaboo" with the moon

Astrophotographer B.G. Boyd captured this view of the crescent moon making its way toward Mars in the early morning sky over Tucson, Arizona, shortly before the occultation began on Feb. 18, 2020.
Astrophotographer B.G. Boyd captured this view of the crescent moon making its way toward Mars in the early morning sky over Tucson, Arizona, shortly before the occultation began on Feb. 18, 2020.

Thursday, February 20, 2020: Mars ducks behind the crescent moon's lower limb in this photo from the lunar occultation on Tuesday (Feb. 18). Astrophotographer B.G. Boyd captured this view of the crescent moon as it began to slide in front of the Red Planet in the early morning sky over Tucson, Arizona, shortly before the occultation began at 4:38 a.m. local time. About an hour later, Mars reappeared from the moon's dark limb. In this photo, the planet appears as a small orange speck that just barely touches bottom edge of the crescent moon. You can see more photos and a video of the occultation here. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Robot arm "waves" at the moon

The last quarter moon looms behind the International Space Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm in this photo by NASA astronaut Jessica Meir. She and her Expedition 62 crewmate Andrew Morgan used Canadarm2 to grapple an arriving Cygnus cargo spacecraft on Tuesday (Feb. 18). "The mighty @csa_asc #Canadarm2 ready to grapple, as @AstroDrewMorgan & I practiced our maneuvers to capture #Cygnus that is headed our way, loaded with nearly 7,500 pounds of science, cargo, and @Space_Station supplies," Meir tweeted on Saturday (Feb. 15). "Even the Moon made an appearance, awaiting #ARTEMIS eagerly," she added, referring to NASA's Artemis program, which aims to land astronauts on the moon in 2024.
The last quarter moon looms behind the International Space Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm in this photo by NASA astronaut Jessica Meir. She and her Expedition 62 crewmate Andrew Morgan used Canadarm2 to grapple an arriving Cygnus cargo spacecraft on Tuesday (Feb. 18). "The mighty @csa_asc #Canadarm2 ready to grapple, as @AstroDrewMorgan & I practiced our maneuvers to capture #Cygnus that is headed our way, loaded with nearly 7,500 pounds of science, cargo, and @Space_Station supplies," Meir tweeted on Saturday (Feb. 15). "Even the Moon made an appearance, awaiting #ARTEMIS eagerly," she added, referring to NASA's Artemis program, which aims to land astronauts on the moon in 2024.

Wednesday, February 19, 2020: The last quarter moon looms behind the International Space Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm in this photo by NASA astronaut Jessica Meir. She and her Expedition 62 crewmate Andrew Morgan used Canadarm2 to grapple an arriving Cygnus cargo spacecraft on Tuesday (Feb. 18). "The mighty @csa_asc #Canadarm2 ready to grapple, as @AstroDrewMorgan & I practiced our maneuvers to capture #Cygnus that is headed our way, loaded with nearly 7,500 pounds of science, cargo, and @Space_Station supplies," Meir tweeted on Saturday (Feb. 15). "Even the Moon made an appearance, awaiting #ARTEMIS eagerly," she added, referring to NASA's Artemis program, which aims to land astronauts on the moon in 2024. — Hanneke Weitering
 

A spiral galaxy with "open arms"

The spiral galaxy NGC 2008 flaunts its shimmering galactic tentacles in this new image from the Hubble Space Telescope. Originally discovered in 1834 by the astronomer John Herschel, the galaxy resides about 425 million light-years away from Earth in the southern constellation of Pictor, the painter. NGC 2008 is classified as a type Sc galaxy, which means that it is a spiral with "a relatively small central bulge and more open spiral arms," NASA said in a statement. "Spiral galaxies with larger central bulges tend to have more tightly wrapped arms, and are classified as Sa galaxies, while those in between are classified as type Sb."
The spiral galaxy NGC 2008 flaunts its shimmering galactic tentacles in this new image from the Hubble Space Telescope. Originally discovered in 1834 by the astronomer John Herschel, the galaxy resides about 425 million light-years away from Earth in the southern constellation of Pictor, the painter. NGC 2008 is classified as a type Sc galaxy, which means that it is a spiral with "a relatively small central bulge and more open spiral arms," NASA said in a statement. "Spiral galaxies with larger central bulges tend to have more tightly wrapped arms, and are classified as Sa galaxies, while those in between are classified as type Sb."

Tuesday, February 18, 2020: The spiral galaxy NGC 2008 flaunts its shimmering galactic tentacles in this new image from the Hubble Space Telescope. Originally discovered in 1834 by the astronomer John Herschel, the galaxy resides about 425 million light-years away from Earth in the southern constellation of Pictor, the painter. NGC 2008 is classified as a type Sc galaxy, which means that it is a spiral with "a relatively small central bulge and more open spiral arms," NASA said in a statement. "Spiral galaxies with larger central bulges tend to have more tightly wrapped arms, and are classified as Sa galaxies, while those in between are classified as type Sb." — Hanneke Weitering
 

A cosmic valentine

Heart Nebula IC 1805 captured by astrophotographer Miguel Claro from Cumeada Observatory, headquarters of Dark Sky Alqueva Reserve, Reguengos de Monsaraz, Portugal.
Heart Nebula IC 1805 captured by astrophotographer Miguel Claro from Cumeada Observatory, headquarters of Dark Sky Alqueva Reserve, Reguengos de Monsaraz, Portugal.

Friday, February 14, 2020: Happy Valentine's Day from space! The Heart Nebula, also known as IC 1805, shimmers in deep space in this photo by astrophotographer Miguel Claro. Located 7,500 light-years from Earth in the Perseus Arm of the Milky Way galaxy, the Heart Nebula resides in the constellation Cassiopeia. At the cusp of the heart is a bright, fish-shaped knot called the Fishhead Nebula. For more romantic images from across the universe, check out our cosmic Valentine's Day gallery. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Noctilucent clouds seen from space

An astronaut at the International Space Station captured this image of noctilucent or "night-shining" clouds in Earth's upper atmosphere. These clouds, which are made of tiny ice crystals, are only visible during astronomical twilight, when the sun just below the horizon, but the clouds are still illuminated by sunlight. Below the blue cloud layer, the lower part of the atmosphere glows with the signature reddish color of sunset.
An astronaut at the International Space Station captured this image of noctilucent or "night-shining" clouds in Earth's upper atmosphere. These clouds, which are made of tiny ice crystals, are only visible during astronomical twilight, when the sun just below the horizon, but the clouds are still illuminated by sunlight. Below the blue cloud layer, the lower part of the atmosphere glows with the signature reddish color of sunset.

Thursday, February 13, 2020: An astronaut at the International Space Station captured this image of noctilucent or "night-shining" clouds in Earth's upper atmosphere. These clouds, which are made of tiny ice crystals, are only visible during astronomical twilight, when the sun just below the horizon, but the clouds are still illuminated by sunlight. Below the blue cloud layer, the lower part of the atmosphere glows with the signature reddish color of sunset. — Hanneke Weitering
 

The Eskimo Nebula

The planetary nebula NGC 2392, also known as the "Eskimo Nebula," is the colorful remnant of a star that died about 4,200 light-years from Earth, leaving behind a brilliant orb of intricate layers and patterns. This star didn't die in a supernova explosion, but rather burned up all of its fuel, causing it to cool, expand and shed its outer layers. This image combines data collected via NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope in 2013, and citizen scientist Kevin Gill recently reprocessed the image to bring out the nebula's detailed structure.
The planetary nebula NGC 2392, also known as the "Eskimo Nebula," is the colorful remnant of a star that died about 4,200 light-years from Earth, leaving behind a brilliant orb of intricate layers and patterns. This star didn't die in a supernova explosion, but rather burned up all of its fuel, causing it to cool, expand and shed its outer layers. This image combines data collected via NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope in 2013, and citizen scientist Kevin Gill recently reprocessed the image to bring out the nebula's detailed structure.

Wednesday, February 12, 2020: The planetary nebula NGC 2392, also known as the "Eskimo Nebula," is the colorful remnant of a star that died about 4,200 light-years from Earth, leaving behind a brilliant orb of intricate layers and patterns. This star didn't die in a supernova explosion, but rather burned up all of its fuel, causing it to cool, expand and shed its outer layers. This image combines data collected via NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Hubble Space Telescope in 2013, and citizen scientist Kevin Gill recently reprocessed the image to bring out the nebula's detailed structure. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Antares rocket under the Snow Moon

The full moon appears to hover over Pad-0A of NASA's Wallops Flight Facility at dawn on Feb. 9, 2020 where a Northrop Grumman Antares rocket and Cygnus cargo ship stood ready for a launch attempt to the International Space Station.
The full moon appears to hover over Pad-0A of NASA's Wallops Flight Facility at dawn on Feb. 9, 2020 where a Northrop Grumman Antares rocket and Cygnus cargo ship stood ready for a launch attempt to the International Space Station.

Tuesday, February 11, 2020: An Antares rocket topped with Northrop Grumman's Cygnus NG-13 cargo spacecraft stands ready for launch under the almost-super Full Snow Moon at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. The cargo resupply mission was scheduled to launch to the International Space Station on Sunday (Feb. 9), but NASA aborted the launch at the last minute due to off-nominal data from ground support equipment. It is now scheduled to launch to earlier than Thursday (Feb. 13) at 4:05 p.m. EST (2105 GMT). — Hanneke Weitering
 

Solar Orbiter launches to the sun

The European Space Agency's Solar Orbiter lifts off on an Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, on a historic mission to study the sun's poles.
The European Space Agency's Solar Orbiter lifts off on an Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, on a historic mission to study the sun's poles.

Monday, February 10, 2020: The European Space Agency's Solar Orbiter lifts off on an Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, on a historic mission to study the sun's poles. The Atlas V rocket successfully launched Solar Orbiter from Space Launch Complex 41 last night at 11:03 p.m. EST (0403 GMT), and this timelapse photo shows its curved path into space. Over the course of the next 20 months, Solar Orbiter will perform a series of gravity-assist maneuvers, flying by Venus and Earth before venturing to the inner solar system, where it will study the sun up close, capturing unprecedented imagery of our star's poles. — Hanneke Weitering
 

A fresh crater in Valles Marineris

NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has spotted a relatively fresh crater on the Red Planet using its High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera. While lower-resolution images can help scientists identify craters on the Martian surface, high-resolution images like this one can help them determine the age of a crater. For example, radial features known as "rays," which streak outward from the center of a crater, indicate that a crater is relatively young, because these features typically erode over time. A so-called "ejecta blanket" of dark basaltic rock, shown here in blue, creates a splash-like pattern closer to the site of the impact. NASA estimates that this crater, located in Valles Marineris, was created sometime between February and July of 2005.
NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has spotted a relatively fresh crater on the Red Planet using its High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera. While lower-resolution images can help scientists identify craters on the Martian surface, high-resolution images like this one can help them determine the age of a crater. For example, radial features known as "rays," which streak outward from the center of a crater, indicate that a crater is relatively young, because these features typically erode over time. A so-called "ejecta blanket" of dark basaltic rock, shown here in blue, creates a splash-like pattern closer to the site of the impact. NASA estimates that this crater, located in Valles Marineris, was created sometime between February and July of 2005.

Friday, February 7, 2020: NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter has spotted a relatively fresh crater on the Red Planet using its High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera. While lower-resolution images can help scientists identify craters on the Martian surface, high-resolution images like this one can help them determine the age of a crater. For example, radial features known as "rays," which streak outward from the center of a crater, indicate that a crater is relatively young, because these features typically erode over time. A so-called "ejecta blanket" of dark basaltic rock, shown here in blue, creates a splash-like pattern closer to the site of the impact. NASA estimates that this crater, located in Valles Marineris, was created sometime between February and July of 2005. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Welcome home, Expedition 61!

Thursday, February 6, 2020: The Soyuz MS-13 crew capsule carrying three astronauts home from the International Space Station touches down on the snowy steppe of Kazakhstan in this aerial shot by NASA photographer Bill Ingalls. The capsule touched down today at 4:12 a.m. EST (0912 GMT or 3:12 p.m. local time), with NASA's record-breaking astronaut Christina Koch, European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano and Russian cosmonaut Alexander Skvortsov. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Touchdown!

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket booster sticks a vertical landing on the company's drone ship "Of Course I Still Love You" in the Atlantic Ocean, following its successful launch of 60 Starlink satellites on Jan. 29. This was the third time that this reusable rocket booster has launched and landed and the 49th time that SpaceX has recovered a Falcon 9 booster.
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket booster sticks a vertical landing on the company's drone ship "Of Course I Still Love You" in the Atlantic Ocean, following its successful launch of 60 Starlink satellites on Jan. 29. This was the third time that this reusable rocket booster has launched and landed and the 49th time that SpaceX has recovered a Falcon 9 booster.

Wednesday, February 5, 2020: A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket booster sticks a vertical landing on the company's drone ship "Of Course I Still Love You" in the Atlantic Ocean, following its successful launch of 60 Starlink satellites on Jan. 29. This was the third time that this reusable rocket booster has launched and landed and the 49th time that SpaceX has recovered a Falcon 9 booster. This launch brought the total number of SpaceX's Starlink satellites up to 240, and the company already has permission from the U.S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to launch up to 12,000 of the internet satellites, though that number could swell to 30,000. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Cygnus on the move

A Northrop Grumman Cygnus cargo spacecraft drifts away from the International Space Station after ground controllers used the station's Canadarm2 robotic arm to send it off on Friday (Jan. 31). While most departing cargo vessels head straight back down to Earth to burn up in our planet's atmosphere after completing their mission to the space station, this cargo craft, dubbed the S.S. Alan Bean, has one more mission to tackle before it meets its fiery demise. It will spend about a month in orbit to deploy a series of small satellites that will perform a variety of science experiments in space.
A Northrop Grumman Cygnus cargo spacecraft drifts away from the International Space Station after ground controllers used the station's Canadarm2 robotic arm to send it off on Friday (Jan. 31). While most departing cargo vessels head straight back down to Earth to burn up in our planet's atmosphere after completing their mission to the space station, this cargo craft, dubbed the S.S. Alan Bean, has one more mission to tackle before it meets its fiery demise. It will spend about a month in orbit to deploy a series of small satellites that will perform a variety of science experiments in space.

Tuesday, February 4, 2020: A Northrop Grumman Cygnus cargo spacecraft drifts away from the International Space Station after ground controllers used the station's Canadarm2 robotic arm to send it off on Friday (Jan. 31). While most departing cargo vessels head straight back down to Earth to burn up in our planet's atmosphere after completing their mission to the space station, this cargo craft, dubbed the S.S. Alan Bean, has one more mission to tackle before it meets its fiery demise. It will spend about a month in orbit to deploy a series of small satellites that will perform a variety of science experiments in space. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Venus and Jupiter meet in the Milky Way

The two brightest planets in the night sky, Venus and Jupiter, meet up for a conjunction in front of the Milky Way's shimmering core in this view from the La Silla Observatory in Chile.
The two brightest planets in the night sky, Venus and Jupiter, meet up for a conjunction in front of the Milky Way's shimmering core in this view from the La Silla Observatory in Chile.

Monday, February 3, 2020: The two brightest planets in the night sky, Venus and Jupiter, meet up for a conjunction in front of the Milky Way's shimmering core in this view from the La Silla Observatory in Chile. European Southern Observatory (ESO) photo ambassador Zdenek Bardon spent three nights trying to capture this image of the planetary encounter in late November, as clouds and humidity partially obstructed the view. Usually the La Silla Observatory has clear skies and low humidity due to its high elevation; it is located on a mountain in the Atacama Desert that is nearly 8,000 feet (2,400 meters) above sea level. While Bardon was perhaps unlucky for having to wait a few days for clear skies, this stunning photo was worth the wait! — Hanneke Weitering
 

Astronauts gather in the Cupola observatory

NASA astronauts (from left) Christina Koch, Jessica Meir and Andrew Morgan peer through the International Space Station's "window to the world," the cupola. The trio were on robotics duty monitoring the arrival and capture of the Cygnus space freighter from Northrop Grumman, on Nov. 4, 2019.
NASA astronauts (from left) Christina Koch, Jessica Meir and Andrew Morgan peer through the International Space Station's "window to the world," the cupola. The trio were on robotics duty monitoring the arrival and capture of the Cygnus space freighter from Northrop Grumman, on Nov. 4, 2019.

Friday, January 31, 2020: Three NASA astronauts peer through the windows of the International Space Station's Cupola observatory in this view from one of the station's external cameras. From left, Christina Koch, Jessica Meir and Andrew Morgan, all flight engineers for Expedition 61, prepare for the arrival of Northrop Grumman's Cygnus NG-12 cargo freighter, which arrived at the orbiting lab on Nov. 4, 2019. That Cygnus spacecraft just departed the station this morning, beginning a monthlong secondary mission to deploy small experiments in orbit before it burns up in Earth's atmosphere. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Starlink 3 launches from Florida

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifts off from from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Wednesday (Jan. 29) to deliver 60 new Starlink satellites for its growing satellite internet constellation. The reusable rocket successfully launched and landed for a third time with this mission, and SpaceX managed to “catch” one half of the payload fairing with one of its net-wielding boats, known as "Ms. Tree."
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifts off from from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Wednesday (Jan. 29) to deliver 60 new Starlink satellites for its growing satellite internet constellation. The reusable rocket successfully launched and landed for a third time with this mission, and SpaceX managed to “catch” one half of the payload fairing with one of its net-wielding boats, known as "Ms. Tree."

Thursday, January 30, 2020: A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket lifts off from from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Wednesday (Jan. 29) to deliver 60 new Starlink satellites for its growing satellite internet constellation. The reusable rocket successfully launched and landed for a third time with this mission, called Starlink 3, and SpaceX managed to “catch” one half of the payload fairing with one of its net-wielding boats, known as "Ms. Tree." — Hanneke Weitering
 

Spacewalking astronaut works on the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer

NASA astronaut Andrew Morgan is pictured working outside the International Space Station to finish up repairs to an ailing dark matter experiment called the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer during a spacewalk on Jan. 25. He and European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano spent 6 hours and 16 minutes working outside the orbiting lab in what was their fourth spacewalk together to repair the $2 billion experiment.
NASA astronaut Andrew Morgan is pictured working outside the International Space Station to finish up repairs to an ailing dark matter experiment called the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer during a spacewalk on Jan. 25. He and European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano spent 6 hours and 16 minutes working outside the orbiting lab in what was their fourth spacewalk together to repair the $2 billion experiment.

Wednesday, January 29, 2020: NASA astronaut Andrew Morgan is pictured working outside the International Space Station to finish up repairs to an ailing dark matter experiment called the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer during a spacewalk on Jan. 25. He and European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano spent 6 hours and 16 minutes working outside the orbiting lab in what was their fourth spacewalk together to repair the $2 billion experiment. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Green auroras meet orange airglow

A vibrant, green aurora lights up Earth's upper atmosphere in this photo captured by an astronaut at the International Space Station. When this photo was taken on Jan. 22, the station was orbiting 261 miles (420 kilometers) above the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of North America. Beneath the northern lights is a blanket of marmalade-colored airglow, a type of luminescence caused by ultraviolet light that triggers chemical reactions high in Earth's atmosphere. Auroras, on the other hand, are created when charged particles from the sun ionize or excite particles in the atmosphere.
A vibrant, green aurora lights up Earth's upper atmosphere in this photo captured by an astronaut at the International Space Station. When this photo was taken on Jan. 22, the station was orbiting 261 miles (420 kilometers) above the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of North America. Beneath the northern lights is a blanket of marmalade-colored airglow, a type of luminescence caused by ultraviolet light that triggers chemical reactions high in Earth's atmosphere. Auroras, on the other hand, are created when charged particles from the sun ionize or excite particles in the atmosphere.

Tuesday. January 28, 2020: A vibrant, lime-green aurora lights up Earth's upper atmosphere in this photo captured by an astronaut at the International Space Station. When this photo was taken on Jan. 22, the station was orbiting 261 miles (420 kilometers) above the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of North America. Beneath the northern lights is a blanket of marmalade-colored airglow, a type of luminescence caused by ultraviolet light that triggers chemical reactions high in Earth's atmosphere. Auroras, on the other hand, are created when charged particles from the sun ionize or excite particles in the atmosphere, and they only occur near our planet's north and south poles. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Hubble eyes a strange spiral galaxy

The barred spiral galaxy NGC 1022 flaunts its tendrils of dark, red dust in this new view from the Hubble Space Telescope. While most barred spiral galaxies have a distinct bar of stars at their centers, the bar inside NGC 1022 is a bit more difficult to make out. To spot the faint feature, look for the swirling arms emerging from both ends. Hubble captured this image of NGC 1022 as part of a study into black holes, which lie at the center of most (if not all) spiral galaxies like this one.
The barred spiral galaxy NGC 1022 flaunts its tendrils of dark, red dust in this new view from the Hubble Space Telescope. While most barred spiral galaxies have a distinct bar of stars at their centers, the bar inside NGC 1022 is a bit more difficult to make out. To spot the faint feature, look for the swirling arms emerging from both ends. Hubble captured this image of NGC 1022 as part of a study into black holes, which lie at the center of most (if not all) spiral galaxies like this one.

Monday, January 27, 2020: The barred spiral galaxy NGC 1022 flaunts its tendrils of dark, red dust in this new view from the Hubble Space Telescope. While most barred spiral galaxies have a distinct bar of stars at their centers, the bar inside NGC 1022 is a bit more difficult to make out. To spot the faint feature, look for the swirling arms emerging from both ends. Hubble captured this image of NGC 1022 as part of a study into black holes, which lie at the center of most (if not all) spiral galaxies like this one. — Hanneke Weitering
 

A volcano eruption's ashy aftermath

A new satellite view of the Taal volcano that erupted in the Philippines on Jan. 12 reveals an island that is now completely covered in a thick layer of ash. The eruption blasted ash plumes 9 miles (14 kilometers) into the air, and strong winds blew large amounts of ash to neighboring regions, especially the Agoncillo area, visible southwest of the Taal volcano. The European Space Agency's Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission acquired this view of the island on Thursday (Jan. 23).
A new satellite view of the Taal volcano that erupted in the Philippines on Jan. 12 reveals an island that is now completely covered in a thick layer of ash. The eruption blasted ash plumes 9 miles (14 kilometers) into the air, and strong winds blew large amounts of ash to neighboring regions, especially the Agoncillo area, visible southwest of the Taal volcano. The European Space Agency's Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission acquired this view of the island on Thursday (Jan. 23).

Friday, January 24, 2020: A new satellite view of the Taal volcano that erupted in the Philippines on Jan. 12 reveals an island that is now completely covered in a thick blanket of ash. The eruption on Luzon island blasted ash plumes 9 miles (14 kilometers) into the air, and strong winds blew large amounts of ash to neighboring regions, especially the Agoncillo area, visible southwest of the Taal volcano. The European Space Agency's Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission acquired this view of the area on Thursday (Jan. 23). — Hanneke Weitering
 

Light trails at the International Space Station

Light trails streak across the Earth as star trails circle overhead in this stunning long-exposure photo taken by NASA astronaut Christina Koch at the International Space Station. At the top of the frame are the space station's solar arrays. Down below, flashes of lightning are scattered across the Earth's surface, while orange airglow illuminates the atmosphere.
Light trails streak across the Earth as star trails circle overhead in this stunning long-exposure photo taken by NASA astronaut Christina Koch at the International Space Station. At the top of the frame are the space station's solar arrays. Down below, flashes of lightning are scattered across the Earth's surface, while orange airglow illuminates the atmosphere.

Thursday, January 23, 2020: Light trails streak across the Earth as star trails circle overhead in this stunning long-exposure photo taken by NASA astronaut Christina Koch at the International Space Station. At the top of the frame are the space station's solar arrays. Down below, flashes of lightning are scattered across the Earth's surface, while orange airglow illuminates the atmosphere. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Crew Dragon launches on critical abort test

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket blasts off from NASA's Kennedy Space Center for an uncrewed in-flight abort test of the company's Crew Dragon spacecraft. The mission, which launched on Sunday (Jan. 19), successfully performed a crucial test of the capsule's emergency abort system that would carry astronauts to safety in the event of a problem during launch. The Crew Dragon separated from the Falcon 9 rocket (which was destroyed during the test), and it splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean about 9 minutes after liftoff.
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket blasts off from NASA's Kennedy Space Center for an uncrewed in-flight abort test of the company's Crew Dragon spacecraft. The mission, which launched on Sunday (Jan. 19), successfully performed a crucial test of the capsule's emergency abort system that would carry astronauts to safety in the event of a problem during launch. The Crew Dragon separated from the Falcon 9 rocket (which was destroyed during the test), and it splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean about 9 minutes after liftoff.

Wednesday, January 22, 2020: A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket blasts off from NASA's Kennedy Space Center for an uncrewed in-flight abort test of the company's Crew Dragon spacecraft. The mission, which launched on Sunday (Jan. 19), performed a crucial test of the capsule's emergency abort system that would carry astronauts to safety in the event of a problem during launch. The Crew Dragon successfully separated from the Falcon 9 rocket (which was destroyed during the test) mid-flight, and it splashed down in the Atlantic Ocean about 9 minutes after liftoff. — Hanneke Weitering
 

A stellar nursery shines in Vela 

Colorful stars sparkle across a sea of cosmic dust and gas in this new view of Gum 26, a star-forming region in the Milky Way galaxy. Located 20,000 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Vela, the sails, Gum 26 is a hydrogen-rich emission nebula, also known as an H II region, where collapsing clumps of dust and gas are actively forming new stars. This new image of the stellar nursery was captured by the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope in Chile.
Colorful stars sparkle across a sea of cosmic dust and gas in this new view of Gum 26, a star-forming region in the Milky Way galaxy. Located 20,000 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Vela, the sails, Gum 26 is a hydrogen-rich emission nebula, also known as an H II region, where collapsing clumps of dust and gas are actively forming new stars. This new image of the stellar nursery was captured by the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope in Chile.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020: Colorful stars sparkle across a sea of cosmic dust and gas in this new view of Gum 26, a star-forming region in the Milky Way galaxy. Located 20,000 light-years from Earth in the constellation of Vela, the sails, Gum 26 is a hydrogen-rich emission nebula, also known as an H II region, where collapsing clumps of dust and gas are actively forming new stars. This new image of the stellar nursery was captured by the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope in Chile. — Hanneke Weitering
  

1st Arianespace launch of 2020

Friday, January 17, 2020: An Ariane 5 rocket rises between the silhouettes of two palm trees as it lifts off into the cloud-covered evening sky in Kourou, French Guiana, in this photo from Arianespace's first launch of the year. The rocket launched two communications satellites for Eutelsat and the Indian Space Research Organisation into orbit yesterday (Jan. 16) after lifting off from the Guiana Space Center at 6:05 p.m. local time (4:05 p.m. EST or 2105 GMT). — Hanneke Weitering
 

SLS under the Full Wolf Moon 

The Full Wolf Moon rises behind NASA's Vehicle Assembly Building at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, in this photo by NASA photographer Ben Smegelsky. To the right of the Vehicle Assembly Building is the mobile launcher that NASA will use to launch its new Space Launch System rocket and Orion crew spacecraft, which the agency plans to use to send astronauts back to the moon in 2024.
The Full Wolf Moon rises behind NASA's Vehicle Assembly Building at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, in this photo by NASA photographer Ben Smegelsky. To the right of the Vehicle Assembly Building is the mobile launcher that NASA will use to launch its new Space Launch System rocket and Orion crew spacecraft, which the agency plans to use to send astronauts back to the moon in 2024.

Thursday, January 16, 2020: January's Full Wolf Moon rises behind NASA's Vehicle Assembly Building at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, in this photo by NASA photographer Ben Smegelsky. To the right of the Vehicle Assembly Building is the mobile launcher that NASA will use to launch its new Space Launch System rocket and Orion crew spacecraft, which the agency plans to use to send astronauts back to the moon in 2024. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Milky Way shines over Residencia

Wednesday, January 15, 2020: The arc of the Milky Way galaxy forms a glowing dome above the European Southern Observatory's Residencia, a hotel for astronomers that was featured in the James Bond movie "Quantum of Solace." Residencia is located on top of Cerro Paranal, a mountain in Chile's Atacama Desert that is home to the Paranal Observatory. Also featured in this photo are two neighboring galaxies known as the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, seen just below the Milky Way's glittering arc. — Hanneke Weitering
 

A Martian winter wonderland

This image of the north pole on Mars, captured by the European Space Agency's Mars Express orbiter, shows part of the planet's polar ice cap rippled with dark-red troughs and depressions, which indicate that strong winds have been blowing in the area. Although it does not snow on Mars, storm clouds can kick dust up into the atmosphere, causing erosion that changes the appearance of the landscape over time.
This image of the north pole on Mars, captured by the European Space Agency's Mars Express orbiter, shows part of the planet's polar ice cap rippled with dark-red troughs and depressions, which indicate that strong winds have been blowing in the area. Although it does not snow on Mars, storm clouds can kick dust up into the atmosphere, causing erosion that changes the appearance of the landscape over time.

Tuesday, January 14, 2020: Earth isn't the only planet with a frosty north pole. This image of the north pole on Mars, captured by the European Space Agency's Mars Express orbiter, shows part of the planet's polar ice cap rippled with dark-red troughs and depressions, which indicate that strong winds have been blowing in the area. Although it does not snow on Mars, storm clouds can kick dust up into the atmosphere, causing erosion that changes the appearance of the landscape over time. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Full Wolf Moon rising

The Full Wolf Moon rises above the mountains near Kuratica, Macedonia, in this photo taken by Stojan Stojanovski on Jan. 10, 2020.
The Full Wolf Moon rises above the mountains near Kuratica, Macedonia, in this photo taken by Stojan Stojanovski on Jan. 10, 2020.

Monday, January 13, 2020: The Full Wolf Moon rises above the frosty mountains of Macedonia in this photo taken by Stojan Stojanovski on Friday (Jan. 10). Stojanovski captured this view of the rising moon near the town of Kuratica, shortly before a penumbral lunar eclipse cast a subtle shadow on the moon's face. (See photos of the lunar eclipse in this Space.com gallery.) — Hanneke Weitering
 

Australia's wildfires seen from space

Thick clouds of brown smoke from Australia's bushfires spread across the Tasman Sea in this photo captured by an astronaut at the International Space Station. The photo was taken on Jan. 4, when the station was orbiting 269 miles (433 kilometers) above the Tasman Sea.
Thick clouds of brown smoke from Australia's bushfires spread across the Tasman Sea in this photo captured by an astronaut at the International Space Station. The photo was taken on Jan. 4, when the station was orbiting 269 miles (433 kilometers) above the Tasman Sea.

Friday, January 10, 2020: Thick clouds of brown smoke from Australia's bushfires spread across the Tasman Sea in this photo captured by an astronaut at the International Space Station. The photo was taken on Jan. 4, when the station was orbiting 269 miles (433 kilometers) above the Tasman Sea. — Hanneke Weitering
 

The Swan Nebula

Thursday, January 9, 2020: The Swan Nebula, one of the biggest and brightest star forming regions in the Milky Way galaxy, only recently formed into the bird-shaped cloud we see today, new images have revealed. This composite image of the Swan Nebula combines data from NASA's flying telescope SOFIA (the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy), NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and the European Space Agency's Herschel Space Telescope. In this image, astronomers discovered nine new protostars, or areas where dust and gas are collapsing to form new stars, and they were able to determine the ages of different features within the nebula. 

"The central region is the oldest, most evolved and likely formed first," NASA officials said in a statement. "Next, the northern area formed, while the southern region is the youngest. Even though the northern area is older than the southern region, the radiation and stellar winds from previous generations of stars has disturbed the material there, preventing it from collapsing to form the next generation." — Hanneke Weitering
 

Starlink satellites head to space

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket soars into space with 60 of the company's Starlink internet satellites in this long-exposure photo of the launch on Monday (Jan. 6). The rocket lifted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida at 9:19 p.m. EST (0219 GMT Tuesday) before returning to Earth for a drone-ship landing, marking the fourth time that this particular booster has flown.
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket soars into space with 60 of the company's Starlink internet satellites in this long-exposure photo of the launch on Monday (Jan. 6). The rocket lifted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida at 9:19 p.m. EST (0219 GMT Tuesday) before returning to Earth for a drone-ship landing, marking the fourth time that this particular booster has flown.

Wednesday, January 8, 2020: A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket soars into space with 60 of the company's Starlink internet satellites in this long-exposure photo of the launch on Monday (Jan. 6). The rocket lifted off from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida at 9:19 p.m. EST (0219 GMT Tuesday) before returning to Earth for a drone-ship landing, marking the fourth time that this particular booster has flown. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Hubble eyes a gigantic galaxy

This new image from the Hubble Space Telescope features the enormous galaxy UGC 2885, which may be the largest known galaxy in the local universe. Located 232 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Perseus, UGC 2885 is about 2.5 times the width of the Milky Way and contains 10 times the number of stars. However, it's a relatively quiet galaxy, with new stars forming at only half the rate of new stars in the Milky Way.
This new image from the Hubble Space Telescope features the enormous galaxy UGC 2885, which may be the largest known galaxy in the local universe. Located 232 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Perseus, UGC 2885 is about 2.5 times the width of the Milky Way and contains 10 times the number of stars. However, it's a relatively quiet galaxy, with new stars forming at only half the rate of new stars in the Milky Way.

Tuesday, January 7, 2020: This new image from the Hubble Space Telescope features the enormous spiral galaxy UGC 2885, which may be the largest known galaxy in the local universe. Located 232 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Perseus, UGC 2885 is about 2.5 times the width of the Milky Way and contains 10 times the number of stars. However, it's a relatively quiet galaxy, with new stars forming at only half the rate of new stars in the Milky Way. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Meteors and auroras seen from space

As the annual Quadrantid meteor shower rained "shooting stars" over Earth this weekend, NASA astronaut Christina Koch captured this view of several meteors blazing through the atmosphere beneath the International Space Station. Meanwhile, brilliant lime-green auroras light up the sky in the distance, together with a soft orange airglow.
As the annual Quadrantid meteor shower rained "shooting stars" over Earth this weekend, NASA astronaut Christina Koch captured this view of several meteors blazing through the atmosphere beneath the International Space Station. Meanwhile, brilliant lime-green auroras light up the sky in the distance, together with a soft orange airglow.

Monday, January 6, 2020: As the annual Quadrantid meteor shower rained "shooting stars" over Earth this weekend, NASA astronaut Christina Koch captured this view of several meteors blazing through the atmosphere beneath the International Space Station. Meanwhile, brilliant lime-green auroras light up the sky in the distance, together with a soft orange airglow. — Hanneke Weitering
 

A burst of color in Chile's night sky

Green and yellow airglow topped with the shimmering core of the Milky Way galaxy provide a beautiful backdrop for a telescope at the Paranal Observatory in Chile in this image by European Southern Observatory (ESO) astrophotographer Yuri Beletsky. The telescope pictured here is one of four small auxiliary telescopes for ESO's Very Large Telescope array.
Green and yellow airglow topped with the shimmering core of the Milky Way galaxy provide a beautiful backdrop for a telescope at the Paranal Observatory in Chile in this image by European Southern Observatory (ESO) astrophotographer Yuri Beletsky. The telescope pictured here is one of four small auxiliary telescopes for ESO's Very Large Telescope array.

Friday, January 3, 2020: Green and yellow airglow topped with the shimmering core of the Milky Way galaxy provide a beautiful backdrop for a telescope at the Paranal Observatory in Chile in this image by European Southern Observatory (ESO) astrophotographer Yuri Beletsky. The telescope pictured here is one of four small auxiliary telescopes for ESO's Very Large Telescope array. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Stars and airglow over Iran 

A vivid, green airglow blankets Earth's upper atmosphere under the starry night sky in this view from the International Space Station. An astronaut aboard the station captured this image on Dec. 29, 2019, when the station was orbiting about 260 miles (420 kilometers) above northern Iran, as it was about to pass over the Caspian Sea.
A vivid, green airglow blankets Earth's upper atmosphere under the starry night sky in this view from the International Space Station. An astronaut aboard the station captured this image on Dec. 29, 2019, when the station was orbiting about 260 miles (420 kilometers) above northern Iran, as it was about to pass over the Caspian Sea.

Thursday, January 2, 2020: A vivid, green airglow blankets Earth's upper atmosphere under the starry night sky in this view from the International Space Station. An astronaut on board captured this image on Dec. 29, when the station was orbiting about 260 miles (420 kilometers) above northern Iran, as the orbiting laboratory was about to pass over the Caspian Sea. — Hanneke Weitering
 

A galaxy in Berenice's Hair

The Hubble Space Telescope captured this stunning view of the spiral galaxy NGC 4455 in the constellation Coma Berenices, or Berenice's Hair. The galaxy is 45 million light-years away. This Hubble image was released Dec. 30, 2019.
The Hubble Space Telescope captured this stunning view of the spiral galaxy NGC 4455 in the constellation Coma Berenices, or Berenice's Hair. The galaxy is 45 million light-years away. This Hubble image was released Dec. 30, 2019.

Wednesday, January 1, 2020: The Hubble Space Telescope captured this stunning view of the spiral galaxy NGC 4455 in the constellation Coma Berenices, or Berenice's Hair, using its Advanced Camera for Surveys. The image was released Dec. 30. The galaxy is 45 million light-years away and its home constellation is the only star pattern to be named after an actual person from history: Queen Berenice II of Egypt.

According to ESA, Berenice was a queen of the ancient Greek city Cyrene (in what is now modern-day Libya) and later ruled Egypt after marrying its ruler, her cousin Ptolemy III Euergetes. She famously offered locks of her hair to the gods for Ptolemy's safe return from battle. — Tariq Malik
 

Swirls of Jupiter

From NASA: NASA's Juno spacecraft captured this impressive image revealing a band of swirling clouds in Jupiter's northern latitudes during Juno's close flyby on Nov. 3, 2019. Small pop-up storms can also be seen rising above the lighter areas of the clouds, most noticeably on the right side of the image.
From NASA: NASA's Juno spacecraft captured this impressive image revealing a band of swirling clouds in Jupiter's northern latitudes during Juno's close flyby on Nov. 3, 2019. Small pop-up storms can also be seen rising above the lighter areas of the clouds, most noticeably on the right side of the image.

Tuesday, December 31, 2019: A swirling band of clouds churns on Jupiter in this amazing image from NASA's Juno spacecraft currently orbiting the largest planet in our solar system. This image is an enhanced view by citizen scientist Björn Jónsson, who processed an image taken on Nov. 3 by Juno's JunoCam as the spacecraft was 3,200 miles (5,200 km) above Jupiter's cloudtops. 

Small "pop-up" storms are visible rising above the lighter areas in the clouds. They're most noticeable at the right, according to a NASA description. — Tariq Malik
 

A colorful sky

The skies above the European Southern Observatory's Paranal Observatory are ablaze with color— blues, purples, oranges, greens, yellows and reds all mingle together to create this striking view of the Chilean site. One of the Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs) comprising ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) is visible in the foreground, bathed in an eerie yellow-green glow.
The skies above the European Southern Observatory's Paranal Observatory are ablaze with color— blues, purples, oranges, greens, yellows and reds all mingle together to create this striking view of the Chilean site. One of the Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs) comprising ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) is visible in the foreground, bathed in an eerie yellow-green glow.

Monday, December 30, 2019: The skies above the European Southern Observatory's Paranal Observatory in Chile's Atacama Desert are ablaze with color in this dazzling photo by photographer Yuri Beletsky released by ESO Dec. 30.  In the foreground is one of ESO's Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs), which are used to make up the Very Large Telescope (VLT), bathed in an eerie yellow-green glow while the Milky Way glitters overhead. — Tariq Malik
 

A Stellar Snowflake

Newborn stars, hidden behind thick dust, are revealed in this image of a section of the so-called Christmas Tree Cluster from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.
Newborn stars, hidden behind thick dust, are revealed in this image of a section of the so-called Christmas Tree Cluster from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

Friday, December 27, 2019: This view from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a cosmic snowflake, an intricate structure that forms part of the so-called Christmas Tree Cluster. "The newly revealed infant stars appear as pink and red specks toward the center and appear to have formed in regularly spaced intervals along linear structures in a configuration that resembles the spokes of a wheel or the pattern of a snowflake. Hence, astronomers have nicknamed this the 'Snowflake Cluster,' NASA officials explained in an image description. The Spitzer Space Telescope is an infrared space observatory.  — Tariq Malik
 

A Christmas Eve Launch

A dazzling view of the first stage engines of a Russian Proton rocket firing to launch the Electro-L 3 weather satellite into orbit from Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan on Dec. 24, 2019.
A dazzling view of the first stage engines of a Russian Proton rocket firing to launch the Electro-L 3 weather satellite into orbit from Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan on Dec. 24, 2019.

Thursday, December 26, 2019: A dazzling view of the first stage engines of a Russian Proton rocket firing to launch the Electro-L 3 weather satellite into orbit from Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan on Dec. 24, 2019. You can see a video of the Christmas Eve launch here, along with a mission overview. — Tariq Malik
 

White Christmas

Italian astronaut Luca Parmitano of the European Space Agency snapped this image of a snow-covered Earth on Christmas Eve, Dec. 24, 2019.
Italian astronaut Luca Parmitano of the European Space Agency snapped this image of a snow-covered Earth on Christmas Eve, Dec. 24, 2019.

Wednesday, December 25, 2019: The Earth is a snowy winter wonderland in this stunning photo from European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano on the International Space Station. Parmitano snapped this photo on Christmas Eve (Dec. 24) posting it on Twitter with a holiday message for all. 

"Winter landscapes: The moon rises over a snow covered world," he wrote. Parmitano commands the space station's Expedition 61 crew. You can see their Christmas and holiday video message from space here! — Tariq Malik
 

Hubble Spots a Galactic Bulge

The spiral galaxy IC 2051, seen here in an image from the Hubble Space Telescope, is shaped like a flying saucer, with a bulge of stars at the center of its flat disk. This type of galactic bulge is believed to influence the growth of supermassive black holes that lurk at the center of most spiral galaxies, and they play a key role in how galaxies evolve.
The spiral galaxy IC 2051, seen here in an image from the Hubble Space Telescope, is shaped like a flying saucer, with a bulge of stars at the center of its flat disk. This type of galactic bulge is believed to influence the growth of supermassive black holes that lurk at the center of most spiral galaxies, and they play a key role in how galaxies evolve.

Tuesday, December 24, 2019: The spiral galaxy IC 2051, seen here in an image from the Hubble Space Telescope, is shaped like a flying saucer, with a bulge of stars at the center of its flat disk. This type of galactic bulge is believed to influence the growth of supermassive black holes that lurk at the center of most spiral galaxies, and they play a key role in how galaxies evolve. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Starliner Returns

Monday, December 23, 2019: Boeing's CST-100 Starliner ejects its heat shield while parachuting down to Earth before its historic landing on Sunday (Dec. 22). The uncrewed capsule touched down safely at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, at 7:58 a.m. EST (1258 GMT), after spending only about 48 hours in space. It was originally scheduled to touch down six days later after a visit to the International Space Station, but Starliner never reached the orbiting laboratory after an anomaly during the launch left it in the wrong orbit. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Starliner Launches to Space

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket carrying Boeing's CST-100 Starliner spacecraft soars into space after launching from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Dec. 20, 2019. Down below, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, left, ULA president and CEO Tory Bruno and NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine observe from NASA's Kennedy Space Center.
A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket carrying Boeing's CST-100 Starliner spacecraft soars into space after launching from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida on Dec. 20, 2019. Down below, Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, left, ULA president and CEO Tory Bruno and NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine observe from NASA's Kennedy Space Center.

Friday, December 20, 2019: A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket carrying Boeing's CST-100 Starliner spacecraft soars into space after launching from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida this morning. Down below (from left to right), Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, left, ULA president and CEO Tory Bruno and NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine observe from NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The flight went according to plan until about 15 minutes after liftoff, when Starliner could not complete its orbit insertion burn due to an anomaly. Starliner was supposed to dock with the International Space Station on Saturday (Dec. 21), but it will now make an early landing on Sunday (Dec. 22) without having reached the space station. — Hanneke Weitering
 

A 'Candy Cane' in the Milky Way

NASA scientists have spotted what looks like a candy cane-shaped cloud of glowing gas at the center of the Milky Way. The "candy cane" is about 190 light-years long and contains ionized gas that emits radio waves. Astronomers discovered it using an instrument known as the Goddard-IRAM Superconducting 2-Millimeter Observer, or GISMO, together with a radio telescope on Pico Veleta in Spain.
NASA scientists have spotted what looks like a candy cane-shaped cloud of glowing gas at the center of the Milky Way. The "candy cane" is about 190 light-years long and contains ionized gas that emits radio waves. Astronomers discovered it using an instrument known as the Goddard-IRAM Superconducting 2-Millimeter Observer, or GISMO, together with a radio telescope on Pico Veleta in Spain.

Thursday, December 19, 2019: NASA scientists have spotted what looks like a candy cane-shaped cloud of glowing gas near the center of the Milky Way. The "candy cane" is about 190 light-years long and contains ionized gas that emits radio waves. Astronomers discovered it using an instrument known as the Goddard-IRAM Superconducting 2-Millimeter Observer, or GISMO, together with a radio telescope on Pico Veleta in Spain. You can see the full, annotated version of this image here. — Hanneke Weitering
 

CHEOPS Launches on Exoplanet Mission

Wednesday, December 18, 2019: An Arianespace Soyuz rocket lifts off from the Guiana Space Center in French Guiana, carrying the European Space Agency's newest exoplanet-hunting satellite. The Characterizing Exoplanet Satellite (CHEOPS) mission, which launched this morning at 3:54 a.m. EST (5:54 a.m. local time; 0854 GMT) will study alien worlds to learn more about their characteristics and to determine which, if any, may be hospitable to extraterrestrial life. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Psychedelic Swirls on Jupiter

Jupiter goes psychedelic in this new, full-disk image from NASA's Juno spacecraft. Citizen scientist Prateek Sarpal created this view of Jupiter using data that the orbiter's JunoCam instrument collected during its 22nd perijove, or close approach, on Sept. 12. Sarpal named this creation, "A mind of limits, a camera of thoughts."
Jupiter goes psychedelic in this new, full-disk image from NASA's Juno spacecraft. Citizen scientist Prateek Sarpal created this view of Jupiter using data that the orbiter's JunoCam instrument collected during its 22nd perijove, or close approach, on Sept. 12. Sarpal named this creation, "A mind of limits, a camera of thoughts."

Tuesday, December 17, 2019: Jupiter goes psychedelic in this new, full-disk image from NASA's Juno spacecraft. Citizen scientist Prateek Sarpal created this view of Jupiter using data that the orbiter's JunoCam instrument collected during its 22nd perijove, or close approach, on Sept. 12. Sarpal named this creation, "A mind of limits, a camera of thoughts." You can find more funky Jupiter art and raw images from Juno that are free to download and edit in NASA's JunoCam portal. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Hubble Spots Interstellar Comet Borisov

The interstellar comet Borisov appears to come face-to-face with a distant spiral galaxy in this image from the Hubble Space Telescope. Hubble captured this image on Dec. 12, as the interstellar comet was racing through the inner solar system. At the time, the object was about 260 million miles (420 million kilometers) from Earth, while the unnamed background galaxy (officially designated 2MASX J10500165-0152029), is nearly half a billion light-years away.  The galaxy appears smudged because Hubble was tracking the motion of the comet, which was zooming through space at a speed of about 109,000 mph (175,000 km/h).
The interstellar comet Borisov appears to come face-to-face with a distant spiral galaxy in this image from the Hubble Space Telescope. Hubble captured this image on Dec. 12, as the interstellar comet was racing through the inner solar system. At the time, the object was about 260 million miles (420 million kilometers) from Earth, while the unnamed background galaxy (officially designated 2MASX J10500165-0152029), is nearly half a billion light-years away. The galaxy appears smudged because Hubble was tracking the motion of the comet, which was zooming through space at a speed of about 109,000 mph (175,000 km/h).

Monday, December 16, 2019: The interstellar comet Borisov appears to come face-to-face with a distant spiral galaxy in this image from the Hubble Space Telescope. Hubble captured this image on Dec. 12, as the interstellar comet was racing through the inner solar system. At the time, the object was about 260 million miles (420 million kilometers) from Earth, while the unnamed background galaxy (officially designated 2MASX J10500165-0152029), is nearly half a billion light-years away.  The galaxy appears smudged because Hubble was tracking the motion of the comet, which was zooming through space at a speed of about 109,000 mph (175,000 km/h). — Hanneke Weitering
 

Algae Blooms Seen from Space

Green algae blooms swirl across the Baltic Sea in this image from the European Space Agency's Copernicus Sentinel-2 satellite. The green color comes from chlorophyll in the phytoplankton, or microscopic plants that drift at the surface of the water. The chlorophyll makes these algae blooms visible from space, allowing satellites to track the tiny organisms.
Green algae blooms swirl across the Baltic Sea in this image from the European Space Agency's Copernicus Sentinel-2 satellite. The green color comes from chlorophyll in the phytoplankton, or microscopic plants that drift at the surface of the water. The chlorophyll makes these algae blooms visible from space, allowing satellites to track the tiny organisms.

Friday, December 13, 2019: Green algae blooms swirl across the Baltic Sea in this image from the European Space Agency's Copernicus Sentinel-2 satellite. The green color comes from chlorophyll in the phytoplankton, or microscopic plants that drift at the surface of the water. The chlorophyll makes these algae blooms visible from space, allowing satellites to track the tiny organisms. — Hanneke Weitering
 

'Cloudy with a Chance of Dust'

Thick clouds of interstellar dust and gas permeate the star forming region RCW 36, also known as Gum 20, in this deep-space image from the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile. Located about 2,300 light-years away from Earth in the constellation of Vela, the Sails, RCW 36 is part of a much larger star formation complex, known as the Vela Molecular Ridge. Astronomers used an instrument on VLT called the Focal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrograph (FORS) to capture this image of RCW 36, which is in some parts so thick with dust and gas that background light cannot pass through. These dark regions are the richest with star formation.
Thick clouds of interstellar dust and gas permeate the star forming region RCW 36, also known as Gum 20, in this deep-space image from the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile. Located about 2,300 light-years away from Earth in the constellation of Vela, the Sails, RCW 36 is part of a much larger star formation complex, known as the Vela Molecular Ridge. Astronomers used an instrument on VLT called the Focal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrograph (FORS) to capture this image of RCW 36, which is in some parts so thick with dust and gas that background light cannot pass through. These dark regions are the richest with star formation.

Thursday, December 12, 2019: Thick clouds of interstellar dust and gas permeate the star forming region RCW 36, also known as Gum 20, in this deep-space image from the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile. Located about 2,300 light-years away from Earth in the constellation of Vela (the sails), RCW 36 is part of a much larger star formation complex, known as the Vela Molecular Ridge. Astronomers used an instrument on VLT called the Focal Reducer and low dispersion Spectrograph (FORS) to capture this image of RCW 36, which is in some parts so thick with dust and gas that background light cannot pass through. These dark regions are the richest with star formation. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Dragon Approaches the Space Station

As SpaceX's Dragon CRS-19 cargo resupply ship arrives at the International Space Station, astronauts used the Canadarm2 robotic arm to reach out and grapple the incoming spacecraft. The Dragon, which arrived on Sunday (Dec. 8), carried more than 5,700 lbs. (2,585 kilograms) of supplies and science experiments for the crew of Expedition 61.
As SpaceX's Dragon CRS-19 cargo resupply ship arrives at the International Space Station, astronauts used the Canadarm2 robotic arm to reach out and grapple the incoming spacecraft. The Dragon, which arrived on Sunday (Dec. 8), carried more than 5,700 lbs. (2,585 kilograms) of supplies and science experiments for the crew of Expedition 61.

Wednesday, December 11, 2019: As SpaceX's Dragon CRS-19 cargo resupply ship approached the International Space Station, astronauts used the Canadarm2 robotic arm to reach out and grapple the incoming spacecraft. The Dragon, which docked with the station on Sunday (Dec. 8), carried more than 5,700 lbs. (2,585 kilograms) of supplies and science experiments for the crew of Expedition 61. — Hanneke Weitering
 

A Swirling Galaxy

Scientists used images captured by the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3 to piece together this portrait of a galaxy called NGC 3175.
Scientists used images captured by the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3 to piece together this portrait of a galaxy called NGC 3175.

Tuesday, December 10, 2019: Scientists used images captured by the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3 to piece together this portrait of a galaxy called NGC 3175. The galaxy has given its clunky name to a cluster of neighbors that astronomers consider quite similar to our own galaxy clique, the Local Group. But NGC 3175 and its companions are located about 50 million light-years away from us. -- Meghan Bartels
 

A Triumphant Return

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket booster makes a triumphant return to Port Canaveral, Florida on Dec. 7, 2019, two days after launching a Dragon cargo ship for NASA on the CRS-19 mission.
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket booster makes a triumphant return to Port Canaveral, Florida on Dec. 7, 2019, two days after launching a Dragon cargo ship for NASA on the CRS-19 mission.

Monday, December 9, 2019: A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket booster makes a triumphant return to Port Canaveral, Florida on Dec. 7, 2019, two days after launching a Dragon cargo ship for NASA on the CRS-19 mission. This Falcon 9 rocket made its first flight on the CRS-19 mission. It launched from Space Launch Complex-40 on Dec. 5, then returned to Earth to a pinpoint landing on the SpaceX drone ship Of Course I Still Love You. The Dragon capsule on the mission made its third trip to space. It arrived at the station on Sunday, Dec. 8. -- Tariq Malik
 

A Cosmic Reflection

A meteor blazes across the Milky Way galaxy in this colorful view from the La Silla Observatory in Chile's Atacama Desert, captured by European Southern Observatory photo ambassador Babak Tafreshi. The starry night sky and orange airglow near the horizon are reflected in the dish of the Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope (SEST).
A meteor blazes across the Milky Way galaxy in this colorful view from the La Silla Observatory in Chile's Atacama Desert, captured by European Southern Observatory photo ambassador Babak Tafreshi. The starry night sky and orange airglow near the horizon are reflected in the dish of the Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope (SEST).

Friday, December 6, 2019: A meteor blazes across the Milky Way galaxy in this colorful view from the La Silla Observatory in Chile's Atacama Desert, captured by European Southern Observatory photo ambassador Babak Tafreshi. The starry night sky and orange airglow near the horizon are reflected in the dish of the Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope. — Hanneke Weitering

Australia's Wildfires Continue to Rage

Wildfires have been raging across the southern and eastern states of Australia since October, and new imagery from the NOAA-NASA Suomi NPP weather satellite show plumes of smoke billowing from multiple fires near the coast of New South Wales. Another Suomi-NPP image captured in November show smoke from Australia's wildfires being swept across the South Atlantic Ocean, and that smoke has since spread to halfway around the world, NASA officials said in a statement. The satellite acquired this image on Wednesday (Dec. 4) at 2:45 p.m. local time, when there were 116 actively burning bush and grass fires in New South Wales alone.
Wildfires have been raging across the southern and eastern states of Australia since October, and new imagery from the NOAA-NASA Suomi NPP weather satellite show plumes of smoke billowing from multiple fires near the coast of New South Wales. Another Suomi-NPP image captured in November show smoke from Australia's wildfires being swept across the South Atlantic Ocean, and that smoke has since spread to halfway around the world, NASA officials said in a statement. The satellite acquired this image on Wednesday (Dec. 4) at 2:45 p.m. local time, when there were 116 actively burning bush and grass fires in New South Wales alone.

Thursday, December 5, 2019: Wildfires have been raging across the southern and eastern states of Australia since October, and new imagery from the NOAA-NASA Suomi NPP weather satellite show plumes of smoke billowing from multiple fires near the coast of New South Wales. Another Suomi-NPP image captured in November show smoke from Australia's wildfires being swept across the South Atlantic Ocean, and that smoke has since spread to halfway around the world, NASA officials said in a statement. The satellite acquired this image on Wednesday (Dec. 4) at 2:45 p.m. local time, when there were 116 actively burning bush and grass fires in New South Wales alone. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Spacewalker Passes Over Venezuela 

European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano passes over the Paraguaná Peninsula of Venezuela while working outside the International Space Station on Monday (Dec. 2). This was the third spacewalk that Parmitano conducted together with NASA astronaut Drew Morgan. The spacewalking duo have been working to repair a particle detector experiment outside the station known as the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer.
European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano passes over the Paraguaná Peninsula of Venezuela while working outside the International Space Station on Monday (Dec. 2). This was the third spacewalk that Parmitano conducted together with NASA astronaut Drew Morgan. The spacewalking duo have been working to repair a particle detector experiment outside the station known as the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer.

Wednesday, December 4, 2019: European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano passes over the Paraguaná Peninsula of Venezuela while working outside the International Space Station on Monday (Dec. 2). This was the third spacewalk that Parmitano conducted together with NASA astronaut Drew Morgan. The spacewalking duo have been working to repair a particle detector experiment outside the station known as the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Milky Way's Galactic Neighbor Shines Over La Silla

The Milky Way galaxy and one of its cosmic neighbors shimmer over the La Silla Observatory in Chile in this night sky photo by European Southern Observatory photographer Petr Horálek. That galactic neighbor is a  dwarf galaxy known as the Large Magellanic Cloud, and directly beneath it is the 7-foot (2.2 meters) MPG-ESO telescope, which scans the cosmos for high-energy gamma ray bursts, or the most powerful explosions in the universe. The smaller telescope on the left is the 3-foot (1 meter) Schmidt telescope, which has been studying galaxies, star clusters, dwarf planets and supernovas for nearly 50 years.
The Milky Way galaxy and one of its cosmic neighbors shimmer over the La Silla Observatory in Chile in this night sky photo by European Southern Observatory photographer Petr Horálek. That galactic neighbor is a dwarf galaxy known as the Large Magellanic Cloud, and directly beneath it is the 7-foot (2.2 meters) MPG-ESO telescope, which scans the cosmos for high-energy gamma ray bursts, or the most powerful explosions in the universe. The smaller telescope on the left is the 3-foot (1 meter) Schmidt telescope, which has been studying galaxies, star clusters, dwarf planets and supernovas for nearly 50 years.

Tuesday, December 3, 2019: The Milky Way galaxy and one of its cosmic neighbors shimmer over the La Silla Observatory in Chile in this night sky photo by European Southern Observatory photographer Petr Horálek. That galactic neighbor is a  dwarf galaxy known as the Large Magellanic Cloud, and directly beneath it is the 7-foot (2.2 meters) MPG-ESO telescope, which scans the cosmos for high-energy gamma ray bursts, or the most powerful explosions in the universe. The smaller telescope on the left is the 3-foot (1 meter) Schmidt telescope, which has been studying galaxies, star clusters, dwarf planets and supernovas for nearly 50 years. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Martian North Pole

Spiral troughs of ice and dust swirl around the Red Planet's polar ice cap in this image of the planet's north pole. Citizen scientist Kevin Gill created this map using images from the European Space Agency's Mars Express orbiter. Along with the swirling ice pattern, which scientists believe was created by winds, the image features a deep canyon known as Chasma Boreale that cuts straight through the ice cap.
Spiral troughs of ice and dust swirl around the Red Planet's polar ice cap in this image of the planet's north pole. Citizen scientist Kevin Gill created this map using images from the European Space Agency's Mars Express orbiter. Along with the swirling ice pattern, which scientists believe was created by winds, the image features a deep canyon known as Chasma Boreale that cuts straight through the ice cap.

Monday, December 2, 2019: Spiral troughs of ice and dust swirl around the Red Planet's polar ice cap in this image of the planet's north pole. Citizen scientist Kevin Gill created this map using images from the European Space Agency's Mars Express orbiter. Along with the swirling ice pattern, which scientists believe was created by winds, the image features a deep canyon known as Chasma Boreale that cuts straight through the ice cap. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Two Galactic Neighbors

While it's common for galaxies to coexist peacefully in the same cosmic neighborhood, these two galaxies are a bit too close for comfort. The galaxies NGC 6286 (right) and NGC 6285 (left), collectively known as Arp 293, are tugging at each other with their mutually strong gravitational attraction, dragging wisps of gas and dust out from the galaxies and into interstellar space. This causes the galaxies to appear "smudged" and blurred from our perspective on Earth. The Hubble Space Telescope captured this image of the galactic pair, which are located more than over 250 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Draco.
While it's common for galaxies to coexist peacefully in the same cosmic neighborhood, these two galaxies are a bit too close for comfort. The galaxies NGC 6286 (right) and NGC 6285 (left), collectively known as Arp 293, are tugging at each other with their mutually strong gravitational attraction, dragging wisps of gas and dust out from the galaxies and into interstellar space. This causes the galaxies to appear "smudged" and blurred from our perspective on Earth. The Hubble Space Telescope captured this image of the galactic pair, which are located more than over 250 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Draco.

Friday, November 29, 2019: While it's common for galaxies to coexist peacefully in the same cosmic neighborhood, these two galaxies are a bit too close for comfort. The galaxies NGC 6286 (right) and NGC 6285 (left), collectively known as Arp 293, are tugging at each other with their mutually strong gravitational attraction, dragging wisps of gas and dust out from the galaxies and into interstellar space. This causes the galaxies to appear "smudged" and blurred from our perspective on Earth. The Hubble Space Telescope captured this image of the galactic pair, which are located more than over 250 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Draco. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Spacewalker Floats Above the Clouds

With his special space camera in hand, NASA astronaut Drew Morgan is seen working outside the International Space Station during his spacewalk with European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano on Nov. 22. This was their second spacewalk together in which they worked to repair an ailing dark matter experiment called the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer. The spacewalking duo will head out again for their third spacewalk together on Dec. 2.
With his special space camera in hand, NASA astronaut Drew Morgan is seen working outside the International Space Station during his spacewalk with European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano on Nov. 22. This was their second spacewalk together in which they worked to repair an ailing dark matter experiment called the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer. The spacewalking duo will head out again for their third spacewalk together on Dec. 2.

Wednesday, November 27, 2019: With his special space camera in hand, NASA astronaut Drew Morgan is seen working outside the International Space Station during his spacewalk with European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano on Nov. 22. This was their second spacewalk together in which they worked to repair an ailing dark matter experiment called the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer. The spacewalking duo will head out again for their third spacewalk together on Dec. 2. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Hubble Eyes an Emission Galaxy 

Looming some 135 million light-years from Earth in the constellation of Centaurus is the bright emission line galaxy NGC 3749, seen here in an image from the Hubble Space Telescope. Astronomers can learn a lot about a galaxy by studying its spectrum of light, particularly the wavelengths of light that are emitted or absorbed by elements it contains. NGC 3749 displays strong emission lines, which means that it is "bursting with star formation and energetic stellar newborns," the European Space Agency said in a statement.
Looming some 135 million light-years from Earth in the constellation of Centaurus is the bright emission line galaxy NGC 3749, seen here in an image from the Hubble Space Telescope. Astronomers can learn a lot about a galaxy by studying its spectrum of light, particularly the wavelengths of light that are emitted or absorbed by elements it contains. NGC 3749 displays strong emission lines, which means that it is "bursting with star formation and energetic stellar newborns," the European Space Agency said in a statement.

Tuesday, November 26, 2019: Looming some 135 million light-years from Earth in the constellation of Centaurus is the bright emission line galaxy NGC 3749, seen here in an image from the Hubble Space Telescope. Astronomers can learn a lot about a galaxy by studying its spectrum of light, particularly the wavelengths of light that are emitted or absorbed by elements it contains. NGC 3749 displays strong emission lines, which means that it is "bursting with star formation and energetic stellar newborns," the European Space Agency said in a statement. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Orion Enters the Super Guppy

NASA's Orion spacecraft is loaded inside the belly of the Super Guppy aircraft at the Launch and Landing Facility runway at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on Nov. 21. The spacecraft, which will fly on the first Artemis mission, was transported to NASA's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, for testing.
NASA's Orion spacecraft is loaded inside the belly of the Super Guppy aircraft at the Launch and Landing Facility runway at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on Nov. 21. The spacecraft, which will fly on the first Artemis mission, was transported to NASA's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, for testing.

Monday, November 25, 2019: NASA's Orion spacecraft is loaded inside the belly of the Super Guppy aircraft at the Launch and Landing Facility runway at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, on Nov. 21. The spacecraft, which will fly on the first Artemis mission, was transported to NASA's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, for testing. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Luca Parmitano 'Rides' Canadarm2

European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano "stands" on the end of the International Space Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm during the first of four spacewalks to repair the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment together with NASA astronaut Drew Morgan, on Nov. 15, 2019.
European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano "stands" on the end of the International Space Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm during the first of four spacewalks to repair the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment together with NASA astronaut Drew Morgan, on Nov. 15, 2019.

Friday, November 22, 2019: European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano "stands" on the end of the International Space Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm during the first of four spacewalks to repair the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer experiment together with NASA astronaut Drew Morgan, on Nov. 15. The spacewalking duo is at it again today; they set out this morning at 7:02 a.m. EST (1200 GMT) for the second spacewalk, which is expected to last about 6.5 hours. You can watch it live here on Space.com. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Hubble Spots a Strange Spiral Galaxy

The spiral galaxy NGC 772, seen here in a new image from the Hubble Space Telescope, bears some striking similarities to the Milky Way galaxy that we call home, with its spiral arms, glowing core and dark dust lanes. But there are some key differences between NGC 772 and the Milky Way. For one, NGC 772 lacks the kind of bar-shaped structure of stars like the one that stretches across the center of the Milky Way. NGC 772 is classified as a peculiar, unbarred spiral galaxy, which means that it is "somewhat odd in size, shape or composition," according to NASA. Located about 130 million light-years away from Earth in the constellation Aries, NGC 772 is about twice the size of the Milky Way.
The spiral galaxy NGC 772, seen here in a new image from the Hubble Space Telescope, bears some striking similarities to the Milky Way galaxy that we call home, with its spiral arms, glowing core and dark dust lanes. But there are some key differences between NGC 772 and the Milky Way. For one, NGC 772 lacks the kind of bar-shaped structure of stars like the one that stretches across the center of the Milky Way. NGC 772 is classified as a peculiar, unbarred spiral galaxy, which means that it is "somewhat odd in size, shape or composition," according to NASA. Located about 130 million light-years away from Earth in the constellation Aries, NGC 772 is about twice the size of the Milky Way.

Thursday, November 21, 2019: The spiral galaxy NGC 772, seen here in a new image from the Hubble Space Telescope, bears some striking similarities to the Milky Way galaxy that we call home, with its spiral arms, glowing core and dark dust lanes. But there are some key differences between NGC 772 and the Milky Way. 

For one, NGC 772 lacks the kind of bar-shaped structure of stars like the one that stretches across the center of the Milky Way. NGC 772 is classified as a peculiar, unbarred spiral galaxy, which means that it is "somewhat odd in size, shape or composition," according to NASA. Located about 130 million light-years away from Earth in the constellation Aries, NGC 772 is about twice the size of the Milky Way. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Bye Bye, Debris Shield!

The debris shield that once protected NASA's Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer from micrometeoroid impacts floats away from the International Space Station after two astronauts removed it and flung it into space during a spacewalk on Nov. 15. European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano used special tools to remove 13 screws and 10 fasteners to release the debris shield, after which NASA astronaut Drew Morgan jettisoned the shield, tossing it toward Earth to burn up in the atmosphere. This was the first of four spacewalks that these two astronauts are conducting to repair the ailing particle detector experiment, which was not designed to be serviced by astronauts in orbit, making these some of the most challenging spacewalks ever.
The debris shield that once protected NASA's Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer from micrometeoroid impacts floats away from the International Space Station after two astronauts removed it and flung it into space during a spacewalk on Nov. 15. European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano used special tools to remove 13 screws and 10 fasteners to release the debris shield, after which NASA astronaut Drew Morgan jettisoned the shield, tossing it toward Earth to burn up in the atmosphere. This was the first of four spacewalks that these two astronauts are conducting to repair the ailing particle detector experiment, which was not designed to be serviced by astronauts in orbit, making these some of the most challenging spacewalks ever.

Wednesday, November 20, 2019: The debris shield that once protected NASA's Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer from micrometeoroid impacts floats away from the International Space Station after two astronauts removed it and flung it into space during a spacewalk on Nov. 15. European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano used special tools to remove 13 screws and 10 fasteners to release the debris shield, after which NASA astronaut Drew Morgan jettisoned the shield, tossing it toward Earth to burn up in the atmosphere. This was the first of four spacewalks that these two astronauts are conducting to repair the ailing particle detector experiment, which was not designed to be serviced by astronauts in orbit, making these some of the most challenging spacewalks ever. — Hanneke Weitering
 

A Vista Under the Milky Way

The Milky Way glistens above the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) at the Paranal Observatory in northern Chile in this stunning night-sky view by European Southern Observatory photo ambassador Babak Tafreshi.
The Milky Way glistens above the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) at the Paranal Observatory in northern Chile in this stunning night-sky view by European Southern Observatory photo ambassador Babak Tafreshi.

Tuesday, November 19, 2019: The Milky Way glistens above the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy (VISTA) at the Paranal Observatory in northern Chile in this stunning night-sky view by European Southern Observatory photo ambassador Babak Tafreshi. Located on a rocky mountaintop in the Atacama Desert, VISTA is the world's largest telescope built to survey the sky in near-infrared light. While its surroundings are barren, VISTA's altitude and surroundings are ideal for astronomy, with almost no cloud cover or light pollution to soil the view. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Space Station Selfie

Monday, November 18, 2019: A view of nearly the entire International Space Station reflects off the helmet visor of European Space Agency astronaut Luca Parmitano in this "space selfie" he took while on a spacewalk last Friday (Nov. 15). He and NASA astronaut Drew Morgan spent 6 hours and 39 minutes working on the complicated repair of an ailing particle detector experiment known as the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS). The duo will embark on the second of four spacewalks on Friday, Nov. 22, when they will continue working on AMS. — Hanneke Weitering

Related: The Best Astronaut Selfies in Space
 

Lunar Halo Over La Silla

A lunar "halo" lights up the night sky above the 3.6-meter telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile. This phenomenon happens when the moon is at an altitude of about 22 degrees above the horizon, where light refracts through icy cirrus clouds. "Light rays that do this tend to 'bunch up' at the angle that represents the least amount of deviation from their original path. For the particular shape of ice crystal lurking within the cirrus clouds, this minimum deviation angle happens to be around 22 degrees," ESO officials said in a description.
A lunar "halo" lights up the night sky above the 3.6-meter telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile. This phenomenon happens when the moon is at an altitude of about 22 degrees above the horizon, where light refracts through icy cirrus clouds. "Light rays that do this tend to 'bunch up' at the angle that represents the least amount of deviation from their original path. For the particular shape of ice crystal lurking within the cirrus clouds, this minimum deviation angle happens to be around 22 degrees," ESO officials said in a description.

Friday, November 15, 2019: A lunar "halo" lights up the night sky above the 3.6-meter telescope at the La Silla Observatory in Chile. This phenomenon happens when the moon is at an altitude of about 22 degrees above the horizon, where light refracts through icy cirrus clouds. "Light rays that do this tend to 'bunch up' at the angle that represents the least amount of deviation from their original path. For the particular shape of ice crystal lurking within the cirrus clouds, this minimum deviation angle happens to be around 22 degrees," ESO officials said in a description. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Apollo 12: A Happy Moon Return

Apollo 12 astronauts Pete Conrad (front) Richard Gordon (left) and Alan Bean (center top in background) walk out to the Astovan for the trip to the launch pad at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida ahead of their Nov. 14, 1969 launch.
Apollo 12 astronauts Pete Conrad (front) Richard Gordon (left) and Alan Bean (center top in background) walk out to the Astovan for the trip to the launch pad at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida ahead of their Nov. 14, 1969 launch.

Thursday, Nov. 14, 2019: Apollo 12 astronauts Pete Conrad (front) Richard Gordon (left) and Alan Bean (center top in background) walk out to the Astrovan for the trip to the launch pad at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida ahead of their Nov. 14, 1969 launch. The launch of Apollo 12, 50 years ago today, kicked off NASA's second crewed moon landing mission, and the first pinpoint lunar landing. Conrad, the mission's commander, and Bean as lunar module pilot landed their Intrepid lander within a short moonwalk of NASA's Surveyor 3 spacecraft. — Tariq Malik

Related: Celebrate NASA's Apollo 12 50th Anniversary with These Webcasts
More:
Apollo 12: How a Passionate Scientist's Keen Eye Led to the First Pinpoint Moon Landing 50 Years Ago
 

Goodbye, Ryugu!

Japan's Hayabusa2 spacecraft departed from the asteroid Ryugu last night to begin its journey back to Earth. This is one of the photos Hayabusa2 took of Ryugu shortly after its departure. The spacecraft will continue to do "farewell observations" of the asteroid as it drifts farther away in space. It will arrive back on Earth at the end of next year with samples from the asteroid's surface.
Japan's Hayabusa2 spacecraft departed from the asteroid Ryugu last night to begin its journey back to Earth. This is one of the photos Hayabusa2 took of Ryugu shortly after its departure. The spacecraft will continue to do "farewell observations" of the asteroid as it drifts farther away in space. It will arrive back on Earth at the end of next year with samples from the asteroid's surface.

Wednesday, November 13, 2019: Japan's Hayabusa2 spacecraft departed from the asteroid Ryugu last night to begin its journey back to Earth. This is one of the photos Hayabusa2 took of Ryugu shortly after its departure. The spacecraft will continue to do "farewell observations" of the asteroid as it drifts farther away in space. It will arrive back on Earth at the end of next year with samples from the asteroid's surface. You can see the latest images from Hayabusa2 here. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Tiny Mercury Transits the Sun

Tuesday, November 12, 2019: Can you spot the teeny-tiny planet Mercury in this photo of the sun? The European Space Agency's Proba-2 satellite captured this image of Mercury's transit yesterday at 10:43 a.m. EST (1543 GMT), about half an hour after Mercury passed the halfway point in its 5.5-hour journey across the sun's disk. The planet appears as a black dot just above and to the right of the sun's center. Still struggling to see it? You can find more photos of the rare Mercury transit in this gallery. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Mercury's Transit Begins

The tiny planet Mercury scoots across the sun's hot corona and onto its bright disk to mark the beginning of the planet's rare transit this morning. The transit began at 7:35 a.m. EST (1235 GMT), when Mercury made its way across the sun's edge.
The tiny planet Mercury scoots across the sun's hot corona and onto its bright disk to mark the beginning of the planet's rare transit this morning. The transit began at 7:35 a.m. EST (1235 GMT), when Mercury made its way across the sun's edge.

Monday, November 11, 2019: The tiny planet Mercury scoots across the sun's hot corona and onto its bright disk to mark the beginning of the planet's rare transit this morning. The transit began at 7:35 a.m. EST (1235 GMT), when Mercury made its way across the sun's edge. It will spend 5 hours and 28 minutes traveling across the face of the sun today, and you can watch it live online. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Hubble Spots a Cosmic Kaleidoscope 

When the Hubble Space Telescope turned its gaze toward the remote galaxy known as the "Sunburst Arc," it saw not one but 12 separate images of the lone cosmic object. That's because there's a massive galaxy cluster in the foreground warping the light with its intense gravitational pull. This illusion is known as gravitational lensing, a phenomenon that Albert Einstein first described in his theory of general relativity. "This 'funhouse mirror' effect not only stretches the background galaxy image, but also creates multiple images of the same galaxy," NASA officials said in a statement.
When the Hubble Space Telescope turned its gaze toward the remote galaxy known as the "Sunburst Arc," it saw not one but 12 separate images of the lone cosmic object. That's because there's a massive galaxy cluster in the foreground warping the light with its intense gravitational pull. This illusion is known as gravitational lensing, a phenomenon that Albert Einstein first described in his theory of general relativity. "This 'funhouse mirror' effect not only stretches the background galaxy image, but also creates multiple images of the same galaxy," NASA officials said in a statement.

Friday, November 8, 2019: When the Hubble Space Telescope turned its gaze toward the remote galaxy known as the "Sunburst Arc," it saw not one but 12 separate images of the lone cosmic object. That's because there's a massive galaxy cluster in the foreground warping the light with its intense gravitational pull. This illusion is known as gravitational lensing, a phenomenon that Albert Einstein first described in his theory of general relativity. "This 'funhouse mirror' effect not only stretches the background galaxy image, but also creates multiple images of the same galaxy," NASA officials said in a statement. — Hanneke Weitering
 

A Jovian Marble

Jupiter looks like a big, swirly space marble in this composite image from NASA's Juno spacecraft. Citizen scientist Kevin Gill processed this image using data collected by Juno during its 23rd close flyby of Jupiter, called a perijove, on Sunday (Nov. 3).
Jupiter looks like a big, swirly space marble in this composite image from NASA's Juno spacecraft. Citizen scientist Kevin Gill processed this image using data collected by Juno during its 23rd close flyby of Jupiter, called a perijove, on Sunday (Nov. 3).

Thursday, November 7, 2019: Jupiter looks like a big, swirly space marble in this composite image from NASA's Juno spacecraft. Citizen scientist Kevin Gill processed this image using data collected by Juno during its 23rd close flyby of Jupiter, called a perijove, on Sunday (Nov. 3). — Hanneke Weitering
 

S.S. Alan Bean Arrives at the Space Station

The International Space Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm grapples an incoming Cygnus cargo spacecraft in this photo taken by an Expedition 61 astronaut. The Cygnus spacecraft, named the S.S. Alan Bean, arrived at the orbiting laboratory on Monday (Nov. 4) carrying about 8,200 lbs. (3,700 kilograms) of supplies and science experiments for the six-person crew.
The International Space Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm grapples an incoming Cygnus cargo spacecraft in this photo taken by an Expedition 61 astronaut. The Cygnus spacecraft, named the S.S. Alan Bean, arrived at the orbiting laboratory on Monday (Nov. 4) carrying about 8,200 lbs. (3,700 kilograms) of supplies and science experiments for the six-person crew.

Wednesday, November 6, 2019: The International Space Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm grapples an incoming Cygnus cargo spacecraft in this photo taken by an Expedition 61 astronaut. The Cygnus spacecraft, named the S.S. Alan Bean, arrived at the orbiting laboratory on Monday (Nov. 4) carrying about 8,200 lbs. (3,700 kilograms) of supplies and science experiments for the six-person crew. — Hanneke Weitering
 

A Glimpse of the Cosmos

The Milky Way galaxy peeks through the opening of the VLT Survey Telescope (VST) in this image captured from inside the observatory by European Southern Observatory photo ambassador Babak Tafreshi. Located at the Paranal Observatory in Chile, VST is the largest telescope on Earth that observes the sky in visible light, or wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation that are visible to the human eye. Pictured front and center in this view is the OmegaCAM instrument, which can capture wide-field images of up to 256 million pixels.
The Milky Way galaxy peeks through the opening of the VLT Survey Telescope (VST) in this image captured from inside the observatory by European Southern Observatory photo ambassador Babak Tafreshi. Located at the Paranal Observatory in Chile, VST is the largest telescope on Earth that observes the sky in visible light, or wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation that are visible to the human eye. Pictured front and center in this view is the OmegaCAM instrument, which can capture wide-field images of up to 256 million pixels.

Tuesday, November 5, 2019: The Milky Way galaxy peeks through the opening of the VLT Survey Telescope (VST) in this image captured from inside the observatory by European Southern Observatory photo ambassador Babak Tafreshi. Located at the Paranal Observatory in Chile, VST is the largest telescope on Earth that observes the sky in visible light, or wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation that are visible to the human eye. Pictured front and center in this view is the OmegaCAM instrument, which can capture wide-field images of up to 256 million pixels. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Starliner Aces Pad Abort Test

Boeing's CST-100 Starliner capsule float back down to Earth above the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico following a successful pad abort test this morning. Today's mission was an uncrewed test of the spacecraft's abort system, which would bring astronauts to safety in the event of an anomaly during launch.
Boeing's CST-100 Starliner capsule float back down to Earth above the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico following a successful pad abort test this morning. Today's mission was an uncrewed test of the spacecraft's abort system, which would bring astronauts to safety in the event of an anomaly during launch.

Monday, November 4, 2019: Boeing's CST-100 Starliner capsule floats back down to Earth above the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico following a successful pad abort test this morning. Today's mission was an uncrewed test of the spacecraft's abort system, which would bring astronauts to safety in the event of an anomaly during launch. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Hubble Eyes a 'Lonely' Galaxy

The spiral galaxy NGC 1706 may look a bit isolated drifting through the cosmos in this Hubble Space Telescope image, but this lonely galaxy has no shortage of neighbors. NGC 1706 belongs to a group of dozens of galaxies, all of which are held together by their mutual gravitational pull.
The spiral galaxy NGC 1706 may look a bit isolated drifting through the cosmos in this Hubble Space Telescope image, but this lonely galaxy has no shortage of neighbors. NGC 1706 belongs to a group of dozens of galaxies, all of which are held together by their mutual gravitational pull.

Friday, November 1, 2019: The spiral galaxy NGC 1706 may look a bit isolated drifting through the cosmos in this Hubble Space Telescope image, but this lonely galaxy has no shortage of neighbors. NGC 1706 belongs to a group of dozens of galaxies, all of which are held together by their mutual gravitational pull. It is located about 230 million light-years away from Earth in the constellation of Dorado, the Swordfish. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Ghost Nebula Wishes You a Happy Halloween!

This ghostly nebula IC 63, about 550 light-years from Earth, emits hydrogen-alpha radiation and also reflects the cool blue light of the powerful nearby star Gamma Cassiopeiae. The nebula is about 0.31 light-years tall and 0.23 light-years wide.
This ghostly nebula IC 63, about 550 light-years from Earth, emits hydrogen-alpha radiation and also reflects the cool blue light of the powerful nearby star Gamma Cassiopeiae. The nebula is about 0.31 light-years tall and 0.23 light-years wide.

Thursday, October 31, 2019: Happy Halloween from space! This ghoulish space cloud is known as the "Ghost of Cassiopeia." The nebula lurks some 550 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cassiopeia, where powerful radiation from a nearby star is slowly causing its clouds to dissipate. Astronomers used the Hubble Space Telescope to captured this image, which was released last year just before Halloween. (This year, Hubble scientists released another special Halloween image of a more creepy-looking space ghost.) — Hanneke Weitering
 

Antares Rocket Preparing for Launch

The Antares rocket that will launch the next cargo shipment to the International Space Station this weekend is pictured shortly after its arrival at the launch pad on Tuesday (Oct. 29). Topped with a Cygnus cargo spacecraft, the rocket will lift off from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia on Saturday, Nov. 2, with about 8,200 lbs. (3,700 kg) of supplies and science experiments for the Expedition 61 crew.
The Antares rocket that will launch the next cargo shipment to the International Space Station this weekend is pictured shortly after its arrival at the launch pad on Tuesday (Oct. 29). Topped with a Cygnus cargo spacecraft, the rocket will lift off from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia on Saturday, Nov. 2, with about 8,200 lbs. (3,700 kg) of supplies and science experiments for the Expedition 61 crew.

Wednesday, October 30, 2019: The Antares rocket that will launch the next cargo shipment to the International Space Station this weekend is pictured shortly after its arrival at the launch pad on Tuesday (Oct. 29). Topped with a Cygnus cargo spacecraft, the rocket will lift off from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia on Saturday, Nov. 2, with about 8,200 lbs. (3,700 kg) of supplies and science experiments for the Expedition 61 crew. — Hanneke Weitering
 

Moonrise at Sunrise