'Planet Killer' Asteroid Is Detected in the Sun's Glare

'Planet Killer' Asteroid , Is Detected , in the Sun's Glare.Scientists working in Chile at the Víctor M. Blanco 4-meter Telescope housed within the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory detected the asteroid.They published a report on their findings on Oct. 31 in the 'The Astronomical Journal.'.Our twilight survey is scouring the area within the orbits of Earth and Venus for asteroids, Scott S. Sheppard, Earth & Planets Laboratory of the Carnegie Institution for Science, via CNN.So far we have found two large near-Earth asteroids that are about 1 kilometer across, a size that we call planet killers, Scott S. Sheppard, Earth & Planets Laboratory of the Carnegie Institution for Science, via CNN.The orbit of asteroid 2022 AP7, one of the two "planet killer"-sized asteroids discovered, could potentially cross paths with Earth's orbit.Asteroids of this size are dubbed "planet killers" because impact "would have a devastating impact on life as we know it.".It would be a mass extinction event like hasn’t been seen on Earth in millions of years, Scott S. Sheppard, Earth & Planets Laboratory of the Carnegie Institution for Science, via CNN.For now, scientists say the asteroid "will stay well away from Earth.".Discovering such asteroids is a complicated undertaking.Deep images are needed because asteroids are faint. , Scott S. Sheppard, Earth & Planets Laboratory of the Carnegie Institution for Science, via CNN.You are fighting the bright twilight sky near the Sun as well as the distorting effect of Earth’s atmosphere, Scott S. Sheppard, Earth & Planets Laboratory of the Carnegie Institution for Science, via CNN.The researchers in Chile use a Dark Energy Camera (DECam), which makes the hunt for asteroids possible.Our DECam survey is one of the largest and most sensitive searches ever performed for objects within Earth’s orbit, Scott S. Sheppard, Earth & Planets Laboratory of the Carnegie Institution for Science, via CNN.This is a unique chance to understand what types of objects are lurking in the inner Solar System, Scott S. Sheppard, Earth & Planets Laboratory of the Carnegie Institution for Science, via CNN