Porn 'ruins lives': Charity issues warning as survey shows one in five UK adults open to working in pornography industry

·3-min read

One in five UK adults would consider a career in pornography if the salary was high enough or if they were guaranteed a safe working environment, according to a new study.

Some 32% of those aged 18-34 said they were tempted by the money they could make, while 8% of those aged over 55 said the same.

However, the Savanta ComRes survey found that 51% of UK adults would be concerned if someone in their family was creating pornographic content on the internet.

Meanwhile, a third of all respondents (34%) agreed that pornography was now an acceptable part of modern society.

Madelaine Booth, 24, creates content for the website OnlyFans which she says has helped with her confidence as well as providing her with a steady stream of revenue.

"It's amazing because you become your own boss and you make your own prices, you start feeling really confident in yourself," she told Sky News.

"You don't have to put in as much effort if you don't want to. No one really wants to have a 9-5 job or wake up every morning and go and mop the toilet floors or deal with customers that aren't being kind all day.

"You do end up making a lot more money than if you were on a minimum wage job - no disrespect to minimum wage jobs of course."

Researchers surveyed 2,087 individuals aged 18 and over across the country for the Naked Truth Project - a charity aiming to combat the damaging impacts of pornography.

CEO Ian Henderson says it should be a concern that so many people are open to pursuing a career in the industry.

"I believe that porn ruins lives, wrecks relationships. It can cause things like mental health problems, addiction, impotency," he said.

"So it may be accepted but it can't be acceptable because people deserve much better than those things.

"Someone once said that the problem with pornography is not that it shows us too much, but that it doesn't actually show us enough. Behind the glamour is often exploitation, coercion, injustice."

Former adult film actor Joshua Broome, who says he made over $1m in the course of his career, left the industry to become a church leader.

He says more must be done to communicate the damaging impacts of pornography, both for those in the industry and those viewing content.

"After making over $1m in the porn industry, travelling the world and many empty intimate encounters, I realised that none of the things that society paints as success brings true happiness.

"I felt empty, used up and worthless. I discovered that peace is not found in things."

He added: "It led me to isolating myself to the point where I went an entire year without hearing my real name.

"So while on the outside looking in I had made all this money, fame and was on the cover of magazines, when I lay my head on the pillow I felt sad and empty and alone, and that caused me to have thoughts of self-harm."

The research findings have been released in advance of the P Word conference, an online event from 28-30 September aimed at better resourcing church leaders to talk about and tackle the negative effects of pornography in their churches and communities.

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