Pregnant Lottie Tomlinson says she was offered no support after tragic deaths of mum and sister

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Lottie Tomlinson has opened up about dealing with the pain of losing her mum and sister just a few years apart (Instagram / Lottie Tomlinson)
Lottie Tomlinson has opened up about dealing with the pain of losing her mum and sister just a few years apart (Instagram / Lottie Tomlinson)

Lottie Tomlinson has opened up about how she dealt with the pain of losing her mum and sister just a few years apart.

The 22-year-old makeup artist is the sister of One Direction singer Louis Tomlinson and she is currently pregnant with her first child with boyfriend Lewis Burton.

Their mum Johannah Deakin died of leukaemia in December 2016 with their younger sister Félicité dying in March 2019 from an accidental overdose.

Appearing on ITV’s Loose Women on Monday, she said: “It was really quick and losing my mum at 18, such a heartbreaking and scary thing.

Lottie Tomlinson opened up during a discussion on ITV’s Loose Women (ITV)
Lottie Tomlinson opened up during a discussion on ITV’s Loose Women (ITV)

“It was quite shocking that we weresurrounded by health professionals and nothing really got offered to us.

“And then losing my sister two years later, the same again, nothing was offered. So I felt like it was my responsibility to the family to get some help and make a difference.

“It’s been a long, hard journey, but the therapy really helped me,” Tomlinson told the panel.

The influencer of one of seven children.

In addition to her, Louis and Felicité, their mother had Daisy and Phoebe, 18, and twins Ernest and Doris, eight.

When asked about how the rest of family dealt with losing their mum, she said: “Everyone had their own reaction, everyone is different. And obviously my sister didn’t cope very well. And I feel things could’ve been different if she’d got the help.”

Tomlinson is now lending her support to bereavement charity Sue Ryder who are calling on the government to commit to development a bereavement pathway which would include offering people help through counselling, prescription drugs and financial support.

“I got recommended to wait three months after a loss, but that might be the timespace when you’re really going through a dark place,” she continued.

She expressed her gratitude for the help that she eventually did receive. She added: “I felt very lucky to get this help, because it’s very expensive to go privately.”

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