Pride rainbow gets ‘inclusive’ makeover – but still not everyone is happy

·2-min read
Dozens of rainbow flags were this week festooned along Regent Street in London in recognition of Pride Month - Jamie Lorriman
Dozens of rainbow flags were this week festooned along Regent Street in London in recognition of Pride Month - Jamie Lorriman

The Pride rainbow has been given an intersex makeover as a new “inclusive” flag was flown across the capital on Wednesday.

Dozens of rainbow flags were this week festooned along Regent Street in London in recognition of Pride Month, replacing many of the Union flags hung to mark the Platinum Jubilee.

The new design is a further development of the so-called Pride Progress flag, introduced in 2018, which saw colourful chevrons introduced to the traditional rainbow stripes to represent the trans community and people of colour.

Now, the new flag has also incorporated a purple circle on a yellow backdrop to represent the intersex community, an umbrella term describing the estimated 1.7 per cent of people born with biological characteristics or chromosome patterns that don’t fit the typical definitions of male or female.

The new flag has incorporated a purple circle on a yellow backdrop to represent the intersex community - Jamie Lorriman
The new flag has incorporated a purple circle on a yellow backdrop to represent the intersex community - Jamie Lorriman

Valentino Vecchietti, who re-designed the flag, said of the original Pride Progress flag: “When I saw the new flag, it instantly made sense to me that it should exist. It felt like a joyful visual and cultural statement of inclusion and I wished our intersex flag could be included too. I also wished that the crowds at Pride knew more about intersex.

“I have redesigned the Pride Progress flag to make it intersex inclusive.

“When I posted our new flag on our Intersex Equality Rights UK Instagram, for our intersex inclusion campaign, we had such an amazing response. Intersex people and allies across the world told us that it’s bringing them so much joy.”

'That flag is hideous'

The design to incorporate yet more elements into an already complex flag has not been universally welcomed, however.

“I really dislike the way a flag specifically designed to encompass everyone is being eaten into by ever more special nods and references,” one Twitter user observed.

“There are countless ‘intersections’ that could be used and aren't, it seems odd to pick and choose in this way rather than keep it simple.”

Another wrote: “Oh god, that flag is hideous.”

As well as appearing on one of the country’s most famous streets, it is due to appear outside embassies in London, including the Canadian and Australian High Commission. This year will mark 50 years since the first Pride event in the UK.

Announcing this year’s event, Pride in London wrote on its website: “This year’s campaign slogan is #AllOurPride, recognising and embracing the many intersecting ways that we celebrate Pride, and commemorating 50 Years since the first march took place in the UK back in 1972.”

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