Princess Anne 'injured by horse' and taken to hospital

Anne, Princess Royal and Lady Sarah Chatto in a carriage
-Credit: (Image: Chris Jackson/Getty Images)


Princess Anne has been taken hospital after suffering what are said to be minor injuries reportedly consistent with being hit by a horse's head or legs. The Princess Royal is the late Queen Elizabeth II's oldest daughter and King Charles III's younger sister.

She is a skilled horsewoman, having competed at the Olympic Games in Montreal in 1976. The princess rode a horse during Trooping the Colour on June 15.

The incident happened at her Gatcombe Park estate in Gloucestershire on Sunday, June 23, Buckingham Palace has said. She is expected to make a 'full and swift recovery' after suffering a concussion.

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Princess Anne, Princess Royal  during Trooping the Colour at Horse Guards Parade
Princess Anne 'injured by horse' and taken to hospital -Credit:John Phillips/Getty Images

Emergency services were called to the estate and the princess was taken to Southmead Hospital in Bristol. She is conscious and is expected to stay in hospital until later this week as a 'precautionary measure for observation', the palace added.

The BBC reports that the princess' husband, Admiral Sir Tim Laurence, and her daughter Zara and son Peter were on the estate at the time. Her husband travelled with her to hospital.

But is has been confirmed that she will miss the state banquet as part of a state visit by the Emperor and Empress of Japan taking place tomorrow, Tuesday, June 25.

King 'being kept closely informed'

A palace statement said: "The King has been kept closely informed and joins the whole Royal Family in sending his fondest love and well-wishes to the Princess for a speedy recovery."

According to the NHS, concussion is a temporary brain injury caused by either a direct bump to the head or to the body which results in your head jolting back and forwards. This causes your brain to move a little inside your skull and cause some injury.

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