Professor Green speaks candidly about body image issues

Rianne Houghton
Photo credit: Professor Green / Facebook

From Digital Spy

Professor Green has been talking candidly about his struggles with body image and depression in a Facebook post.

Following a series of severe health scares back in April of this year, the rapper – real name Stephen Manderson – has told fans that this is just "the beginning of the journey."

Stephen was rushed to hospital earlier this year after suffering a severe allergic reaction following an operation to treat a hernia, making him the second person in the world to have such a reaction.

Photo credit: Professor Green / Instagram

Related: Professor Green calls out 'piece of shit f**king c**t' after his Mercedes is vandalised

As well as suffering from a hernia (which would be more than enough for us), Pro Green also had to contend with pneumonia, a partially collapsed lung, distension and ileus.

Now, in a frank Facebook post, Stephen has thanked his "loyal fans and friends" for their continued support throughout his troubles.

Hitting out at people who post "unrealistic" insights into their world, Professor Green admitted that he 'feels like shit' after a rocky year.

"I've been a shlag to all things bad; a shlag to my depression, a shlag to drink, a shlag to the sesh, a shlag to not creating, a shlag to distracting myself from the one thing that truly makes me happy – music. I've been a shlag to EVERYTHING NEGATIVE," he wrote.

"After surgery going wrong this year it slumped me, I look and feel like shit. If I still look like this in 6 months then I've failed. If there hasn't been a whole load of new music then I've failed.

"No one is going to sort me out for me, so I figured it's probably time I did it for myself. I can't have a dad bod without bloody having a kid first!"

Promising fans that he 'hasn't peaked yet', the rapper also promised that there'll be music on the way soon, and it'll be his "best yet".

Get well soon, Prof!

Readers affected by the issues raised in this story are encouraged to contact Samaritans free on 116 123 (www.samaritans.org) or Mind on 0300 123 3393 (www.mind.org.uk). Readers in the US are encouraged to contact the National Suicide Prevention Line on 1-800-273-8255.

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