Prosecutors eye criminal charges against alleged subway maniac shot with his own gun

Obuad was released without charges but Robinson remains in the hospital.
Dejuan Robinson and Younece Obuad fought on the subway in Brooklyn.


Prosecutors are eyeing criminal charges against accused subway maniac Dajuan Robinson, but are waiting to see if he survives being shot four times with his own gun, sources told The Post Saturday.

Robinson pulled out his pistol on the A train in Brooklyn while fighting with dad-of-two Younece Obuad and an unknown woman on Thursday during the evening rush hour Thursday, sending straphangers scurrying.

Prosecutors decided not to charge Obuad, 32, with shooting Robinson, 36, who was transferred to New York Presbyterian-Weill Cornell Medical Center and remained in critical condition Saturday, officials said.

Dejuan Robinson was shot after a man he was attacking grabbed his gun.
Dejuan Robinson was shot after a man he was attacking grabbed his gun.
Dejuan Robinson and Younece Obuad fought on the A train in Brooklyn.
Dejuan Robinson and Younece Obuad fought on the A train in Brooklyn.

Joseph Giacalone, a retired NYPD sergeant and adjunct professor at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, said Robinson, 36, could be charged with criminal possession of a firearm, fare evasion, menacing and reckless endangerment.

“I guess they’re figuring out if he’s going to survive and what kind of condition he’s going to be in,” he said.

The gunshots sent riders scrambling for cover on the Brooklyn subway. @JoyceMeetsWorld/X-ABC
The gunshots sent riders scrambling for cover on the Brooklyn subway. @JoyceMeetsWorld/X-ABC

“It just goes to show you that you can prevent this kind of behavior just by enforcing one simple rule. All subway crime starts with fare evasion.”

The NYPD issued roughly 120,000 civil summonses for farebeating last year, a record-high since it started publishing records on its website in 2018.

Even Robinson’s mother struggled to deal with him, The Post has learned.

The bullets flew on a packed train at evening rush hour. @JoyceMeetsWorld/X-ABC
The bullets flew on a packed train at evening rush hour. @JoyceMeetsWorld/X-ABC

Robinson’s mom kicked him out of her home last year while she was dying of cancer after he moved in for a few months to help her, her roommate said.

“His mother had him leave because they had a falling out,” the roommate, who asked to remain anonymous, said.

“He was drinking and stuff.”

Younece Obuad struggled with Robinson before getting the gun and shooting him. NO CREDIT
Younece Obuad struggled with Robinson before getting the gun and shooting him. NO CREDIT

“He said he was taking care of her but he really wasn’t doing what he was supposed to do,” she recalled. “He was just being here. She basically came from chemo and stuff she was basically waiting on him and I didn’t agree with that.”

Robinson had fights with his mother, the roommate said.

Robinson has three prior arrests, including a domestic criminal mischief in 2022 on Staten Island: a robbery in 2012: and a grand larceny auto in 2011, both in Queens, cops said.

Robinson brought the pistol onto the train in a bag and pulled it out during the fight.
Robinson brought the pistol onto the train in a bag and pulled it out during the fight.

In the robbery, Robinson waved down a white Lincoln Town car with two accomplices around 2 a.m. on October 12, 2012, at Jamaica Avenue and 179th Street, authorities said in a criminal complaint.

At one point, he placed in hands around the driver’s neck and “started strangling” him from the backseat, while demanding the driver hand over all his money, prosecutors said in the document.

“Just shoot him already,” another one of the robber’s barked, according to the complaint.

One of the robbers punched the driver in the head and put a razor blade against his neck while trying to take the keys out of the ignition.

The trio took his ring, cell phone and money, officials said.

Robinson served five years at Orleans Correctional Facility before he was put on parole, which ended in 2022.