Queen B excites fans with pictures of her twins

Queen B excites fans with pictures of her twins


Johannesburg - Beyoncé almost crashed the internet this week after finally releasing pictures of her month-old twins – the newest additions to the Carter family this week.

The 35-year-old pop star – who also has a daughter, Blue Ivy, 5, with rapper JAY-Z – shared the first official photo of her two new bundles of joy on Instagram, much to the excitement of her fans.

Alongside the picture, which was taken in the garden of her R5.2 million-per-month Malibu rental, she confirmed the names of the boy and girl: “Sir Carter and Rumi 1 month today (sic).”

She was dressed in a tiered kimono and pale blue veil.

The dreamy robe comes courtesy of Palomo Spain’s Boy Walks in an Exotic Forest collection and features a long train, ruffle detailing and exaggerated sleeves.

Beyoncé was cradling Sir and Rumi Carter in a Botticelli-esque image, complete with a flower arch, of course.

The twins looked adorable while resting comfortably in their mother’s arms.

See the pic below:


This is a photo that Queen B’s fans have been waiting for since 18 June when she welcomed the twins into this world.

It was very much in the style of her pregnancy announcement in January, which broke the record for most likes on Instagram.

The record-breaking photo sees Beyoncé holding her baby bump, wearing just a bra, panties and a veil in front of a huge wreath of flowers.

The photo was accompanied by the words: “We would like to share our love and happiness. We have been blessed two times over.

“We are incredibly grateful that our family will be growing by two, and we thank you for your well-wishes,” signing it, “The Carters”.


Beyoncé and her 47-year-old husband are keeping the names Sir Carter and Rumi out of bounds and have reportedly filed trademarks to protect them.

Last month TMZ, a celebrity gossip site, reported the company run by Beyoncé and JAY-Z (real name Shawn Corey Carter) filed legal documents to secure the rights to the unusual monikers.

While both names are distinctly unusual, Sir is the more uncommon of the two, with the name normally used as a title before a knighted man’s first name.

While Rumi is a Japanese name, it’s also the last name of the famed 13th-century Persian poet Jalaluddin Rumi, reported the UK’s Daily Mail. 

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