Rape claim 'Nick' is sacked as a school governor over child-image case

Martin Evans
'Nick' told detectives that the men had raped, tortured and even murdered young boys during a number of ­depraved sex parties held in flats in Dolphin Square close to Parliament - X90130

The alleged fantasist who sparked the Westminster child abuse scandal has been sacked from his role as a school governor after being charged with paedophile ­offences.

The man, who can only be identified as Nick, set off a £3 million police ­investigation after telling detectives he had been raped and abused by a group of powerful figures including prominent politicians. But he has been accused of making the whole thing up and is facing possible charges for perverting the course of justice.

Earlier this week it was revealed he had been charged with numerous paedophile offences after indecent images of children were found on a computer.

A spokesman for the school where he had been a governor for a number of years confirmed that as a result of the charges he had now been sacked.

The spokesman said he was “deeply saddened”, but added that none of the allegations “relate to the position he held as a governor within this school”.

Operation Midland: How it unfolded

As a complainant of sex abuse, Nick enjoys lifelong anonymity, even though he is currently being investigated for allegedly inventing the claims he has made.

This means the school where he was a governor can also not be named.

The paedophile charges he is facing relate to allegations of downloading and possessing hundreds of indecent images of children. He is also facing a charge of voyeurism. He is due to stand trial later this year, when he is expected to deny all the charges.

His sacking as a school governor is the latest twist in the saga that dates back to 2014, when he made a series of allegations to Scotland Yard about a so-called Westminster paedophile ring. Nick told detectives that the men had raped, tortured and even murdered young boys during a number of ­depraved sex parties held in flats in Dolphin Square close to Parliament.

Among those he named were Sir ­Edward Heath, the former prime minister; Lord Brittan, the former home secretary; Field Marshal Lord Bramall, the former head of the Army, and Harvey Proctor, the former Tory MP.

Scotland Yard described Nick’s allegations as “credible and true” and launched Operation Midland.

Lady Brittan – whose husband Lord Brittain (pictured) died without knowing that his name had been cleared Credit: Chris Jackson/PA

Detectives questioned some of the accused under caution and also raided their homes. But after 18 months the investigation was closed down without a single arrest and Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe, now Lord Hogan-Howe, the then Metropolitan Police Commissioner, apologised to those affected.

Lord Bramall and Lady Brittan – whose husband died without knowing that his name had been cleared – later received £100,000 in compensation.

Mr Proctor, who lost his home and job as a result of the damage to his reputation, is suing the Metropolitan Police for up to £500,000.

Nick faces possible prosecution for perverting the course of justice and fraud, after he claimed tens of thousands of pounds from the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority for his alleged ordeal. Northumbria Police passed a file to the Crown Prosecution Service last September but no decision on whether he will be charged is expected before the summer.

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